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Noninvasive brain stimulation

Nicholas P Vyleta, Carolina Borges-Merjane, Peter Jonas
Mossy fiber synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells are 'conditional detonators' that reliably discharge postsynaptic targets. The 'conditional' nature implies that burst activity in dentate gyrus granule cells is required for detonation. Whether single unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) trigger spikes in CA3 neurons remains unknown. Mossy fiber synapses exhibit both pronounced short-term facilitation and uniquely large post-tetanic potentiation (PTP). We tested whether PTP could convert mossy fiber synapses from subdetonator into detonator mode, using a recently developed method to selectively and noninvasively stimulate individual presynaptic terminals in rat brain slices...
October 25, 2016: ELife
Thibaut Aurore, Russo Cristina, Morales-Quezada Leon, Hurtado-Puerto Aura, Deitos Alícia, Steven Freedman, Carvalho Sandra, Fregni Felipe
Transcranial pulsed current stimulation (tPCS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are two noninvasive neuromodulatory brain stimulation techniques whose effects on human brain and behavior have been studied individually. In the present study we aimed to quantify the effects of tDCS and tPCS, individually and in combination, on cortical activity, sensitivity and pain-related assessments in healthy individuals in order to understand their neurophysiological mechanisms and potential applications in clinical populations...
October 17, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Natália de Almeida Carvalho Duarte, Luanda André Collange Grecco, Nelci Zanon, Manuela Galli, Felipe Fregni, Claudia Santos Oliveira
A review of the literature was performed to answer the following questions: Does motor cortex excitability correlate with motor function? Do motor cortex excitability and cortex activation change after a rehabilitation program that results in improvements in motor outcomes? Can the 10-20 electroencephalography (EEG) system be used to locate the primary motor cortex when employing transcranial direct current stimulation? Is there a bihemispheric imbalance in individuals with cerebral palsy similar to what is observed in stroke survivors? the authors found there is an adaptation in the geometry of motor areas and the cortical representation of movement is variable following a brain lesion...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Motor Behavior
F Thomas, V Moulier, A Valéro-Cabré, D Januel
Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are among the most characteristic symptoms of schizophrenia and have been linked to likely disturbances of structural and functional connectivity within frontal, temporal, parietal and subcortical networks involved in language and auditory functions. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown that alterations in the functional connectivity activity of the default-mode network (DMN) may also subtend hallucinations. Noninvasive neurostimulation techniques such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have the ability to modulate activity of targeted cortical sites and their associated networks, showing a high potential for modulating altered connectivity subtending schizophrenia...
October 11, 2016: Revue Neurologique
Nicholas J Kelley, Brandon J Schmeichel
Self-control involves the inhibition of dominant response tendencies. Most research on self-control has examined the inhibition of appetitive tendencies, and recent evidence suggests that stimulation to increase right frontal cortical activity helps to inhibit approach-motivated responses. The current experiment paired an approach-avoidance joystick task with transcranial DC stimulation to test the effects of brain stimulation on the inhibition of both approach and avoidance response tendencies. Anodal stimulation over the right/cathodal stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (compared to the opposite pattern of stimulation or sham stimulation) caused participants to initiate motive-incongruent movements more quickly, thereby suggesting a shared neural mechanism for the self-control of both approach- and avoidance-motivated impulses...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
Vikram G Shakkottai, Amit Batla, Kailash Bhatia, William T Dauer, Christian Dresel, Martin Niethammer, David Eidelberg, Robert S Raike, Yoland Smith, H A Jinnah, Ellen J Hess, Sabine Meunier, Mark Hallett, Rachel Fremont, Kamran Khodakhah, Mark S LeDoux, Traian Popa, Cécile Gallea, Stéphane Lehericy, Andreea C Bostan, Peter L Strick
A role for the cerebellum in causing ataxia, a disorder characterized by uncoordinated movement, is widely accepted. Recent work has suggested that alterations in activity, connectivity, and structure of the cerebellum are also associated with dystonia, a neurological disorder characterized by abnormal and sustained muscle contractions often leading to abnormal maintained postures. In this manuscript, the authors discuss their views on how the cerebellum may play a role in dystonia. The following topics are discussed: The relationships between neuronal/network dysfunctions and motor abnormalities in rodent models of dystonia...
October 12, 2016: Cerebellum
Gustavo José Luvizutto, Gabriela Rizzo Soares Rizzati, Marcelo Ortolani Fogaroli, Rodrigo Thomazi Rodrigues, Priscila Watson Ribeiro, Hélio Rubens de Carvalho Nunes, Gabriel Pereira Braga, Rafael Dalle Molle da Costa, Silméia Garcia Zanati Bazan, Luiz Antônio de Lima Resende, Adriana Bastos Conforto, Rodrigo Bazan
BACKGROUND: Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) is characterized by the inability to report or respond to people or objects that are presented in the spatial hemisphere that is contralateral to the lesioned hemisphere of the brain. USN has been associated with poor functional outcomes and long stays in hospitals and rehabilitation centers. Noninvasive brain stimulation, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), has been used in people who have been affected by USN after stroke...
October 3, 2016: Trials
Paolo Federico, Monica A Perez
The corticospinal tract contributes to the control of finger muscles during precision and power grip. The extent to which different sets of cortical interneuronal circuits during these distinct grasping behaviors remains unknown. To examine this question in humans we used noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the hand representation of the primary motor cortex to elicit motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in an intrinsic finger muscle during index finger abduction (control task), precision grip, and power grip...
October 5, 2016: Cerebral Cortex
Vincenzo Romei, Gregor Thut, Juha Silvanto
Progress in cognitive neuroscience relies on methodological developments to increase the specificity of knowledge obtained regarding brain function. For example, in functional neuroimaging the current trend is to study the type of information carried by brain regions rather than simply compare activation levels induced by task manipulations. In this context noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) in the study of cognitive functions may appear coarse and old fashioned in its conventional uses. However, in their multitude of parameters, and by coupling them with behavioral manipulations, NTBS protocols can reach the specificity of imaging techniques...
September 30, 2016: Trends in Neurosciences
Irene Gonsalvez, Roey Baror, Peter Fried, Emiliano Santarnecchi, Alvaro Pascual-Leone
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a looming public health crisis that currently lacks an effective treatment. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation (NBS), particularly transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), offers a promising alternative approach to pharmacological interventions for an increasing number of neurological and psychiatric conditions. The aim of this review is summarize data from therapeutic trials of NBS in AD and other dementing illnesses. Despite the potential of NBS, there is limited theoretical framework and a lack of guidelines for its applications to AD...
September 30, 2016: Current Alzheimer Research
Gad Alon
The mechanisms that govern the application of noninvasive functional electrical stimulation (FES) have been delineated and clearly described in numerous evidenced-based research publications. The aim of this review is to summarize the primary, multi-system effects of noninvasive FES on the musculoskeletal system, the peripheral vascular system, and the central nervous systems. The presentation will relate these effects to multiple efficacious clinical studies in neuro-rehabilitation. The presentation will include discussion of the latest technological advancement in wearable FES systems and their critical role in achieving functional recovery following damage to the brain...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Michela Pievani, Lorenzo Pini, Stefano F Cappa, Giovanni B Frisoni
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) is increasingly used in the field of dementia as a therapeutic option; however, evidence of clinical efficacy is limited, and the mechanism of action remains unknown. This review summarizes how functional imaging could contribute to the design of targeted and effective NIBS interventions for dementia. RECENT FINDINGS: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has largely contributed to understanding brain dysfunction in dementia by identifying disease-specific networks...
September 22, 2016: Current Opinion in Neurology
Debbie L Morton, Javin S Sandhu, Anthony Kp Jones
Pain is a complex sensory and emotional experience that is heavily influenced by prior experience and expectations of pain. Before the development of noninvasive human brain imaging, our grasp of the brain's role in pain processing was limited to data from postmortem studies, direct recording of brain activity, patient experience and stimulation during neurosurgical procedures, and animal models of pain. Advances made in neuroimaging have bridged the gap between brain activity and the subjective experience of pain and allowed us to better understand the changes in the brain that are associated with both acute and chronic pain...
2016: Journal of Pain Research
Christian Grefkes, Gereon R Fink
PURPOSE: We here provide an update about studies published recently in the field of noninvasive neuromodulation of the motor system, aiming at facilitating recovery of function after stroke. RECENT FINDINGS: A number of longitudinal studies have confirmed that repeated stimulation of the motor cortex in combination with motor training improves performance compared with control or sham stimulation. In the early postacute stroke phase, enhancement of ipsilesional motor cortex excitability by means of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) seems to be a well tolerated and effective strategy to promote motor recovery...
September 17, 2016: Current Opinion in Neurology
Ryo Momosaki, Shoji Kinoshita, Wataru Kakuda, Naoki Yamada, Masahiro Abo
The purpose of this study was to review the best available evidence of noninvasive brain stimulation, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for dysphagia after acquired brain injury. We searched randomized controlled trials that compared noninvasive brain stimulation with control used to improve dysphagia after acquired brain injury. We assessed dysphagia severity rating scales and penetration-aspiration scale as outcomes immediately after intervention...
2016: Journal of Medical Investigation: JMI
Thangavelu Soundara Rajan, Salvatore Cuzzocrea, Daniele Bruschetta, Angelo Quartarone
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans causes a broad range of structural damage and functional deficits due to both primary and secondary injury mechanisms. Over the past three decades, animal models have been established to replicate the diverse changes of human TBI, to study the underlying pathophysiology and to develop new therapeutic strategies. However, drugs that were identified as neuroprotective in animal brain injury models were not successful in clinical trials phase II or phase III. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a powerful noninvasive approach to excite cortical neurons in humans and animals, widely applied for therapeutic purpose in patients with brain diseases...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Alberto Cucca, Milton C Biagioni, Jori E Fleisher, Shashank Agarwal, Andre Son, Pawan Kumar, Miroslaw Brys, Alessandro Di Rocco
Freezing of gait (FOG) is 'an episodic inability to generate effective stepping in the absence of any known cause other than parkinsonism or high level gait disorders'. FOG is one of the most disabling symptoms in Parkinson's disease, especially in its more advanced stages. Early recognition is important as FOG is related to higher fall risk and poorer prognosis. Although specific treatments are still elusive, there have been recent advances in the development of new therapeutic approaches. The aim of this review is to present the latest knowledge regarding the phenomenology, pathogenesis, diagnostic assessment and conventional treatment of FOG in Parkinson's disease...
October 2016: Neurodegenerative Disease Management
Heather T Peters, Lorie Richards, Brittani A Basobas, Julie M Faieta, Stephen J Page
Stroke remains a leading cause of disability, with survivors experiencing long-term decrements in independence and quality of life. Occupational therapists (OTs) employ numerous neurorehabilitative treatment approaches to remediate impairments that are impeding performance. OTs also use physical agent modalities to facilitate increased participation and success in therapy. One such modality is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a form a noninvasive brain stimulation that can be overlaid onto task practice and delivers a constant, low intensity current into the brain...
September 3, 2016: Journal of Motor Behavior
Charlotte Brevet-Aeby, Jerome Brunelin, Sylvain Iceta, Catherine Padovan, Emmanuel Poulet
INTRODUCTION: Impulsivity has been reported in many psychiatric conditions and includes deficits in several cognitive functions such as attention, inhibitory control, risk taking, delay discounting and planning. Many studies have shown that noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques modulate the activity of the prefrontal cortex and the functions involved in impulsivity. OBJECTIVE: This article aims to review the literature on the effect of NIBS on impulsivity in healthy subjects aged 18-65 years old, and to highlight research avenues to develop therapeutic alternatives for such disorders...
August 30, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Marion Psomiades, Clara Fonteneau, Marie-Françoise Suaud-Chagny, Frédéric Haesebaert, Jérôme Brunelin
Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are noninvasive brain stimulation techniques currently used as therapeutic tools in various psychiatric conditions. Applied over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), they showed their efficacy in reducing drug-resistant symptoms in patients with major depression and in patients with schizophrenia with predominantly negative symptoms. The DLPFC is a brain structure involved in the expression of these symptoms as well as in other dysfunctional functions observed in theses conditions such as emotional processes...
2016: Santé Mentale Au Québec
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