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Tactical Combat Casualty Care

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411934/tactical-combat-casualty-care-and-wilderness-medicine-advancing-trauma-care-in-austere-environments
#1
REVIEW
Frank K Butler, Brad Bennett, Colonel Ian Wedmore
Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is a set of evidence-based, best-practice prehospital trauma care guidelines customized for use on the battlefield. Military units that have trained all of their unit members in TCCC have now documented the lowest incidence of preventable deaths in the history of modern warfare and TCCC is now the standard for battlefield trauma care in the US Military. TCCC and wilderness medicine share the goal of optimizing care for patients with trauma in austere environments that impose significant challenges in both equipment and evacuation capability...
May 2017: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28392170/translating-tactical-combat-casualty-care-lessons-learned-to-the-high-threat-civilian-setting-tactical-emergency-casualty-care-and-the-hartford-consensus
#2
REVIEW
David W Callaway
Combat operations necessitate bold thought and afford the opportunity to rapidly evolve and improve trauma care. The development and maturation of Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is an important example of a critical process improvement strategy that reduced mortality in high-threat combat-related trauma. The Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (C-TECC) adapted the lessons of TCCC to the civilian high-threat environment and provided important all-hazards response principles for austere, dynamic, and resource-limited environments...
April 6, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383471/clinical-practice-guideline-adherence-during-operation-inherent-resolve
#3
Timothy P Plackett, Darren C Cherry, Gerald Delk, Steven Satterly, Jared Theler, Derek McVay, Jacqueline Moore, Stacy A Shackelford
BACKGROUND: The Joint Trauma System (JTS) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) contributed to the decrease in battlefield morality over the past 15 years. However, it is unknown to what degree the guidelines are being followed in current military operations. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of all patients treated at three separate US Army Role II facilities during the first ten months of Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq. Charts were reviewed for patient demographics, clinical care, and outcomes...
April 5, 2017: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333837/leadership-lessons-learned-in-tactical-combat-casualty-care
#4
Frank K Butler
The US Military has achieved remarkable success in improving survival for our nation's combat wounded throughout the 14 years of conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan. For the prehospital phase of care, where most combat fatalities occur, these advances have been embodied in Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC.) TCCC is a set of evidence-based, best-practice, prehospital trauma care guidelines that are customized for use on the battlefield. The TCCC Guidelines have been updated on an ongoing basis over the last 15 years through the work of the Committee on TCCC and the TCCC Working Group...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318991/bleeding-control-using-hemostatic-dressings-lessons-learned
#5
REVIEW
Brad L Bennett
Based on lessons learned, many military battlefield trauma advances ultimately transition to enhance civilian trauma care. However, even with major strides to enhance battlefield hemorrhage control, it is unclear how effectively these techniques and products are being translated to civilian trauma. The purpose of this brief review is to present the evidence of current hemostatic product effectiveness, determine the evidence for transitioning of this technology to prehospital civilian application, and provide recommendations about potential use in the wilderness/austere setting...
March 16, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318990/junctional-hemorrhage-control-for-tactical-combat-casualty-care
#6
REVIEW
Russ S Kotwal, Frank K Butler
During historic, as well as more recent, conflicts, most combat casualties who die from their injuries do so in the prehospital setting. Although many of the injuries incurred by these casualties are nonsurvivable, a number of injuries are still potentially survivable. Of those injuries that are potentially survivable, the majority are truncal, junctional, and extremity hemorrhage. Novel and effective approaches directed toward prehospital hemorrhage control have emerged in recent years, some of which can prove useful in the management of junctional hemorrhage whether in a military or civilian setting...
March 16, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28290925/two-decades-of-saving-lives-on-the-battlefield-tactical-combat-casualty-care-turns-20
#7
Frank K Butler
BACKGROUND: Twenty years ago, the original Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) article was published in this journal. Since TCCC is essentially a set of best-practice prehospital trauma care guidelines customized for use on the battlefield, the presence of a journal with a specific focus on military medicine was a profound benefit to the initial presentation of TCCC to the U.S. Military. METHODS: In the two ensuing decades, which included the longest continuous period of armed conflict in our nation's history, TCCC steadily evolved as the prehospital trauma care evidence base was augmented and as feedback from user medics, corpsmen, and pararescuemen was obtained...
March 2017: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28285493/the-use-of-pelvic-binders-in-tactical-combat-casualty-care-tccc-guidelines-change-1602-7-november-2016
#8
Stacy Shackelford, Rick Hammesfahr, Daniel Morissette, Harold R Montgomery, Win Kerr, Michael Broussard, Brad L Bennett, Warren C Dorlac, Stephen Bree, Frank K Butler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284484/tactical-combat-casualty-care-transitioning-battlefield-lessons-learned-to-other-austere-environments
#9
EDITORIAL
Brad Bennett, Ian Wedmore, Frank Butler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 8, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284483/tactical-combat-casualty-care-beginnings
#10
REVIEW
Frank K Butler
Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is a set of evidence-based, best-practice prehospital trauma care guidelines customized for use on the battlefield. The origins of TCCC were nontraditional. The TCCC program began as a Naval Special Warfare biomedical research effort launched after the realization that extremity hemorrhage, a leading cause of preventable death on the battlefield, was not being treated with a readily available and highly effective intervention: the tourniquet. This insight prompted a systematic reevaluation of all aspects of battlefield trauma care that was conducted from 1993 to 1996 as a joint effort by special operations medical personnel and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences...
March 8, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28279652/the-transition-to-the-committee-on-tactical-combat-casualty-care
#11
REVIEW
Stephen D Giebner
The original Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines were published in a special supplement to Military Medicine in 1996 as the terminal deliverable of a 2-year development project funded by the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). Two years later, the USSOCOM Biomedical Initiatives Steering Committee (BISC) promulgated its Task Statement 5-98, in which it called for the formation of a panel of subject matter experts to update the TCCC guidelines. This article discusses the formation of the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC) and the changes to the original guidelines that constituted the first update...
March 6, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28265454/fluid-resuscitation-in-haemorrhagic-shock-in-combat-casualties
#12
REVIEW
Parli R Ravi, Bipin Puri
This brief update reviews the recent literature available on fluid resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock and considers the applicability of this evidence for use in resuscitation of combat casualties in the combat casualty care (CCC) environment. A number of changes need to be incorporated in the CCC guidelines: (1) dried plasma (DP) is added as an option when other blood components or whole blood are not available; (2) the wording is clarified to emphasize that Hetastarch is a less desirable option than whole blood, blood components, or DP and should be used only when these preferred options are not available; (3) the use of blood products in certain tactical field care settings where this option might be feasible (FSC, GH) is discussed; (4) 1:1:1 damage control resuscitation (DCR) with plasma: packed red blood cells (PRBC): platelets is preferred to 1:1 DCR with plasma: PRBC when platelets are available; and (5) the 30-min wait between increments of resuscitation fluid administered to achieve clinical improvement or target blood pressure has been eliminated...
2017: Disaster Mil Med
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28225742/review-of-military-and-civilian-trauma-registries-does-consensus-matter
#13
Thijs T C F van Dongen, Johan de Graaf, Eelco P Huizinga, Howard R Champion, Rigo Hoencamp, Luke P H Leenen
BACKGROUND: Structural collection of data from combat injuries is important to improve provided care and the outcome of (combat) casualties. Trauma registries are used in civilian and military health care systems for systematic administration of injury data. However, these registries often use different methods of data management, compromising international comparison of trauma systems. The aim of this review is to aid in reaching international (coalition-wide) consensus for compatible data collection methods with uniform definitions, which is needed for transnational research and subsequent improvement of medical support organizations...
March 2017: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219471/a-descriptive-analysis-of-tactical-casualty-care-interventions-performed-by-law-enforcement-personnel-in-the-state-of-wisconsin-2010-2015
#14
Chad M Stiles, Christopher Cook, Matthew D Sztajnkrycer
Introduction Based upon military experience, law enforcement has developed guidelines for medical care during high-threat conditions. The purpose of the current study was to provide a descriptive analysis of reported outcomes of law enforcement medical interventions. METHODS: This was a descriptive analysis of a convenience sample of cases submitted to the Wisconsin Tactical Medicine Initiative (Wisconsin USA), after the provision of successful patient care, between January 2010 and December 2015...
February 21, 2017: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27753568/compatibility-of-hydroxyethyl-starch-and-tranexamic-acid-for-battlefield-co-administration
#15
Nicholas M Studer, Ahmad H Yassin, Donald E Keen
INTRODUCTION: The current Tactical Combat Casualty Care Guidelines recommend tranexamic acid (TXA) administration for casualties in whom massive blood transfusion is anticipated. However, despite Hextend being the recommended resuscitation fluid, the guidelines recommend against using TXA with Hextend. This appears to be due to a concern about pharmaceutical compatibility, despite the absence of a direct study of compatibility in the literature. METHODS: Two solutions of Hextend and TXA were examined for compatibility...
October 2016: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734441/evaluation-of-two-junctional-tourniquets-used-on-the-battlefield-combat-ready-clamp%C3%A2-versus-sam%C3%A2-junctional-tourniquet
#16
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Jean-Guillaume Meusnier, Charles Dewar, Erti Mavrovi, Frederic Caremil, Pierre-Francois Wey, Jean-Yves Martinez
BACKGROUND: Junctional hemorrhage (i.e., between the trunk and limbs) are too proximal for a tourniquet and difficult to compress. These hemorrhages are responsible for 20% of preventable deaths by bleeding on the battlefield. The majority of these involve the groin area. Devices allowing a proximal compression for arterial axes have been recently developed. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the use of two junctional- tourniquet models, the Combat Ready Clamp (CRoC®) and the SAM® Junctional Tourniquet (SJT), in simulated out-of-hospital trauma care when tourniquets were ineffective to stop the arterial flow...
2016: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27689383/committee-on-tactical-combat-casualty-care-meeting-2-3-february-2016-atlanta-georgia-meeting-minutes
#17
Anonymous Anonymous
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 0: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27689382/tactical-combat-casualty-care-top-lessons-for-civilian-ems-systems-from-14-years-of-war
#18
Frank K Butler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 0: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27405067/tactical-study-of-care-originating-in-the-prehospital-environment-tacscope-acute-traumatic-coagulopathy-on-the-contemporary-battlefield
#19
Robert T Gerhardt, Elon Glassberg, John B Holcomb, Robert L Mabry, Martin B Schreiber, Philip C Spinella
BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled major hemorrhage and delayed evacuation remain substantial contributors to potentially survivable combat death, along with mission, environment, terrain, logistics, and hostile action. Life-saving interventions and the onset of acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) may also contribute. OBJECTIVE: Analyze US casualty records from the DoD Trauma Registry, using International Normalized Ratio (INR) of 1.5 for onset of ATC. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study from September 2007 to June 2011, inclusive...
September 2016: Shock
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27215893/lessons-learned-employment-and-tactical-use-of-the-combat-medic-during-stability-support-operations
#20
Michael S Eldred
It is the intent of this article to define the strategy by which Combat Medics have been employed in contemporary stability operations and counterinsurgency conflicts. This article describes the advances in training based on Tactical Combat Casualty Care and how training evolved into an evidence-based model. Training platforms evolved with shifts in mission requirements, new technology, improved medical techniques, and changing protocols. The last portion of this article details recommendations in doctrine, materiel, and training that could enable optimal sustainment standards while retaining operational capability across a wide variety of combat and peace operations...
April 2016: U.S. Army Medical Department Journal
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