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immigrant AND minorities

Francisco Soto Mas, Holly E Jacobson
Health literacy is a priority issue in both medicine and public health, as it refers to the capacity to obtain and understand basic health information and services and to make appropriate health decisions. Health literacy has been associated with a variety of health care and health outcomes such as hospital admissions, use of preventive services, management of chronic conditions, and mortality. There is also evidence of the connection between low health literacy and health disparities. Despite federal and private efforts, improving health literacy has proven to be an enormous challenge...
March 1, 2018: Health Promotion Practice
Jielu Lin, Christopher S Marcum, Anna V Wilkinson, Laura M Koehly
Background: Collecting complete and accurate family health history is critical to preventing type 2 diabetes. Purpose: We seek to identify the optimal risk feedback approach that facilitates risk communication between parents and their adult children and helps them develop shared appraisals of family history of type 2 diabetes. Methods: In a sample of parent-adult child dyads from 125 Mexican-heritage families residing in Houston, Texas, we examine change in parent-child dyadic (dis)agreement with respect to their shared family health history from baseline to 10 months after receipt of risk feedback generated by Family Healthware...
February 17, 2018: Annals of Behavioral Medicine: a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
Andres F Doval, Luis Riba, Bao Ngoc N Tran, Rima Rudd, Bernard T Lee
BACKGROUND: Health literacy studies indicate that literacy skills are linked to access to information and health outcomes, potentially contributing to health disparities. In the United States, minority and immigrant populations are more likely to have lower literacy skills than are other population groups. The aim of this study is to evaluate web-based health information prepared in Spanish for Hispanic women considering breast reconstruction surgery. METHODS: A search for the term reconstrucción de seno (translation: breast reconstruction) was conducted using Google...
March 13, 2018: Annals of Plastic Surgery
Beverley Brathwaite
The history of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) women who came to the UK to work as nurses is interwoven with the history of the NHS. The colonial construct of the BAME female nurse is embedded in British society. From the post-second-world-war years to the 1960s, to today, BAME women chose to become nurses and work in the 'motherland', a term regularly used by those immigrating to England from the former colonies. The experiences of the BAME female nurse in the 1970s and early 1980s were of overt racism and lack of advancement...
March 8, 2018: British Journal of Nursing: BJN
Omolade Femi-Ajao, Sarah Kendal, Karina Lovell
INTRODUCTION: Domestic violence and abuse has been recognised as an international public health problem. However, the pervasiveness of the problem is unknown due in part to underreporting, especially among women from ethnic minority populations. In relation to this group, this review seeks to explore: (1) the barriers to disclosure; (2) the facilitators of help-seeking; and (3) self-perceived impacts of domestic violence. DESIGN: We systematically identified published qualitative studies conducted among women from ethnic minority populations in the UK...
March 7, 2018: Ethnicity & Health
Meira Mahmoud Yasin
It has been said that those with the least are often the ones with the most to give. This proved to be true for a Syrian refugee turned cardiologist who provides care in communities that are poor and underserved including refugees, immigrants, minorities, those of low socioeconomic status, and other vulnerable populations. Dr. Heval Kelli is the epitome of a kind-hearted, humble, genuine hero, through his dedication to serving humanity. Between providing health care to those in need, educating future generations of doctors, mentoring high school students, and advocating for the less fortunate, his life is truly his message to the world...
2018: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Christoph Spörlein, Elmar Schlueter
Here we examine a conceptualization of immigrant assimilation that is based on the more general notion that distributional differences erode across generations. We explore this idea by reinvestigating the efficiency-equality trade-off hypothesis, which posits that stratified education systems educate students more efficiently at the cost of increasing inequality in overall levels of competence. In the context of ethnic inequality in math achievement, this study explores the extent to which an education system's characteristics are associated with ethnic inequality in terms of both the group means and group variances in achievement...
2018: PloS One
Raj S Bhopal, Laurence Gruer, Genevieve Cezard, Anne Douglas, Markus F C Steiner, Andrew Millard, Duncan Buchanan, S Vittal Katikireddi, Aziz Sheikh
BACKGROUND: Migrant and ethnic minority groups are often assumed to have poor health relative to the majority population. Few countries have the capacity to study a key indicator, mortality, by ethnicity and country of birth. We hypothesized at least 10% differences in mortality by ethnic group in Scotland that would not be wholly attenuated by adjustment for socio-economic factors or country of birth. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We linked the Scottish 2001 Census to mortality data (2001-2013) in 4...
March 2018: PLoS Medicine
Antony S R Manstead
Drawing on recent research on the psychology of social class, I argue that the material conditions in which people grow up and live have a lasting impact on their personal and social identities and that this influences both the way they think and feel about their social environment and key aspects of their social behaviour. Relative to middle-class counterparts, lower/working-class individuals are less likely to define themselves in terms of their socioeconomic status and are more likely to have interdependent self-concepts; they are also more inclined to explain social events in situational terms, as a result of having a lower sense of personal control...
February 28, 2018: British Journal of Social Psychology
H Robert Outten, Timothy Lee, Rui Costa-Lopes, Michael T Schmitt, Jorge Vala
Using concepts from social identity theory (Tajfel and Turner, 1979), we examined whether racial/ethnic majority group members' reactions to future demographic shifts is a function of the degree to which they perceive their ingroup's higher-status in society to be legitimate. In two studies, participants who varied in the degree to which they perceived their group's status to be legitimate were either exposed to real projections for 2060 (i.e., large decline in proportion of population that is the "majority" group), or fake projections for 2060-that resembled current figures (i...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Fabian Winter, Nan Zhang
Recent waves of immigration to Western nations have fueled a debate over the consequences of ethnic diversity for social cohesion. One prominent argument in this debate holds that diversity is detrimental to trust and cooperation because individuals in heterogeneous communities face difficulties in enforcing social norms across ethnic lines. We examine this proposition in a field experiment involving real-life interactions among residents of multiethnic German neighborhoods. We find significant ethnic asymmetries in the pattern of norm enforcement: Members of the majority "native" German population are more active in sanctioning norm violations, while ethnic minorities are more likely to find themselves the target of sanctions...
February 26, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Loris Vezzali, Gian Antonio Di Bernardo, Sofia Stathi, Alessia Cadamuro, Barbara Lášticová, Simona Andraščiková
Research has provided evidence that the effects of intergroup contact on prejudice reduction are not limited to the outgroup one has contact with (primary outgroup). Rather, they extend to secondary outgroups uninvolved in the contact situation (secondary transfer effect; Pettigrew, 2009, Social Psychology, 40, 55). We aimed to provide the first empirical evidence for the emergence of the secondary transfer effect among children. Majority (Italian) and minority (with an immigrant background) elementary schoolchildren were administered a questionnaire including measures of contact with the primary outgroup (minority children for the majority, majority children for the minority), prejudice towards the primary outgroup and towards a dissimilar secondary outgroup (disabled children), and social dominance orientation...
February 24, 2018: British Journal of Social Psychology
Elyas Bakhtiari, Sigrun Olafsdottir, Jason Beckfield
Scholars interested in the relationship between social context and health have recently turned attention further "upstream" to understand how political, social, and economic institutions shape the distribution of life chances across contexts. We compare minority health inequalities across 22 European countries ( N = 199,981) to investigate how two such arrangements-welfare state effort and immigrant incorporation policies-influence the distribution of health and health inequalities. We examine two measures of health from seven waves of the European Social Survey...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Evangelia Petridou, Christel Barker Jensen, Athanasios Arvanitidis, Maria Giannaki-Psinaki, Athanasios Michos, Karen Angeliki Krogfelt, Randi Føns Petersen
PURPOSE: To determine the predominant strains of Bordetella pertussis in Greece during 2010-2015. METHODOLOGY: Infants and children (n=1150) (15 days to 14 years) of Greek, Roma and immigrant origin with different vaccination statuses were hospitalized in Athens, Greece with suspected pertussis infection. IS481/IS1001 real-time PCR confirmed Bordetella spp./B. pertussis infection in 300 samples. A subset of samples (n=153) were analysed by multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and (n=25) by sequence-based typing of the toxin promotor region (ptxP) on DNA extracted from clinical specimens...
February 2, 2018: Journal of Medical Microbiology
Sameer Bhargava, Kåre Moen, Samera Azeem Qureshi, Solveig Hofvind
Background Groups of immigrant and minority women are more often diagnosed with advanced stage breast cancer than other women. Mammographic screening aims to reduce mortality from breast cancer through early detection in asymptomatic women. Purpose To compare mammographic screening attendance among immigrant and minority women to that of other women. Material and Methods A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, and Cochrane identified 1369 papers published between January 1995 and March 2016. In the review, we included 33 studies investigating mammographic screening attendance among immigrant and/or minority women...
January 1, 2018: Acta Radiologica
Hester Korthals Altes, Serieke Kloet, Frank Cobelens, Martin Bootsma
While tuberculosis (TB) represents a significant disease burden worldwide, low-incidence countries strive to reach the WHO target of pre-elimination by 2035. Screening for TB in immigrants is an important component of the strategy to reduce the TB burden in low-incidence settings. An important option is the screening and preventive treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI). Whether this policy is worthwhile depends on the extent of transmission within the country, and introduction of new cases through import...
2018: PloS One
Christina Radl-Karimi, Anne Nicolaisen, Morten Sodemann, Paul Batalden, Christian von Plessen
INTRODUCTION: Immigrant patients often meet barriers to patient-centred healthcare in their new host countries. Given the heterogeneity of patients from ethnic minorities, established strategies for patient centredness might not work in their case. The concept of coproduction provides a new perspective on how to collaboratively create the highest possible value for both the patient and the healthcare system. The concept acknowledges that all service is coproduced and directs attention to the relationship between patient and care provider...
February 3, 2018: BMJ Open
María Benito, Alexandra Muñoz, Isabel Beltrán, Elena Labajo, Bernardo Perea, José Antonio Sánchez
It is a fact that in recent years requests have greatly increased to obtain estimates of the legal age of undocumented individuals alleged to be minors who have been forced to enter different European Community countries for socioeconomic reasons or due to war. Spain is one of the countries most affected by this illegal immigration because of its proximity to North Africa. Therefore, it has become necessary to develop new standards which help provide a response to the demands of the justice administration. In recent years, the Superior Justice Court has rejected several pieces of expert evidence on the grounds that the age intervals therein were not sufficiently reliable and that the radiographic techniques used to determine age were invasive, potentially causing harm to the alleged minor...
January 29, 2018: Forensic Science International
Su Yeong Kim, Seth J Schwartz, Krista M Perreira, Linda P Juang
Children of immigrants represent one in four children in the United States and will represent one in three children by 2050. Children of Asian and Latino immigrants together represent the majority of children of immigrants in the United States. Children of immigrants may be immigrants themselves, or they may have been born in the United States to foreign-born parents; their status may be legal or undocumented. We review transcultural and culture-specific factors that influence the various ways in which stressors are experienced; we also discuss the ways in which parental socialization and developmental processes function as risk factors or protective factors in their influence on the mental health of children of immigrants...
January 24, 2018: Annual Review of Clinical Psychology
Maria João Lobo Antunes, Eileen M Ahlin
Experiences with neighborhood violence can produce negative consequences in youth, including stress, anxiety, and deviant behavior. Studies report that immigrant and minority youth are more likely to be exposed to violence but less likely to perpetrate it. Similarly, research shows parenting practices are differentially adopted by Blacks, Whites, and Hispanics. Although family management strategies can often act as a barrier to the detrimental effects of exposure to community violence (ETV-C), there is a paucity of investigation on how Hispanic subgroups (e...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Interpersonal Violence
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