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Julie A Cohen, Anusha Kassan
This qualitative study explored the cultural identity negotiation of young adult immigrants. Using a grounded theory research design, 10 semistructured interviews were conducted with emerging adult immigrants (EAI), ages 19-27. Results yielded a substantive model of cultural identity negotiation (MCIN) for EAI and posited that One's Motivation and Sense of Agency to Negotiate Cultural Identity is at the core of how participants navigate their cultural identities. This model included 6 major categories: (a) Family Cultural Rigidity ; (b) Connections Specific to Canada ; (c) Connection to a Same Cultured Community ; (d) Sense of Permanency ; (e) Desire to Preserve Culture of Origin ; (f) Desire to Fit in to Canadian Culture , as well as 2 overarching factors ( Dimension of Time and Dimension of Age ), which were found to be influential on participants' cultural identity negotiation...
March 2018: Journal of Counseling Psychology
Marian Krawczyk, Richard Sawatzky, Kara Schick-Makaroff, Kelli Stajduhar, Joakim Öhlen, Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham, Esther Mercedes Laforest, Robin Cohen
This article applies a micro-meso-macro analytical framework to understand clinicians' experiences and perspectives of using patient-reported outcome and experience measures (PROMs and PREMs) in routine hospital-based palliative care. We structure our discussion through qualitative analysis of a design and implementation project for using an electronic tablet-based tool among hospital-based palliative clinicians to assess patients' and their family caregivers' quality of life concerns and experiences of care...
March 1, 2018: Qualitative Health Research
Stephanie M Topp, Chanda Mwamba, Anjali Sharma, Njekwa Mukamba, Laura K Beres, Elvin Geng, Charles B Holmes, Izukanji Sikazwe
BACKGROUND: Failure to keep people living with HIV engaged in life-long care and treatment has serious implications for individual and population-level health. Nested within a four-province study of HIV care and treatment outcomes, we explored the dynamic role of social and service-related factors influencing retention in HIV care in Zambia. METHODS: From a stratified random sample of 31 facilities, eight clinics were selected, one urban and one rural from each province...
2018: PloS One
Jacqueline Counts, Rebecca Gillam, Teri A Garstka, Ember Urbach
The challenge of maximizing the well-being of children, youth, and families is recognizing that change occurs within complex social systems. Organizations dedicated to improving practice, advancing knowledge, and informing policy for the betterment of all must have the right approach, structure, and personnel to work in these complex systems. The University of Kansas Center for Public Partnerships and Research cultivates a portfolio of innovation, research, and data science approaches positioned to help move social service fields locally, regionally, and nationally...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Evidence-informed Social Work
Ali Jasim Ramadhan
In this paper, we present a wearable smart system to help visually impaired persons (VIPs) walk by themselves through the streets, navigate in public places, and seek assistance. The main components of the system are a microcontroller board, various sensors, cellular communication and GPS modules, and a solar panel. The system employs a set of sensors to track the path and alert the user of obstacles in front of them. The user is alerted by a sound emitted through a buzzer and by vibrations on the wrist, which is helpful when the user has hearing loss or is in a noisy environment...
March 13, 2018: Sensors
Rebekah Laidsaar-Powell, Phyllis Butow, Frances Boyle, Ilona Juraskova
OBJECTIVE: Family caregivers can, at times, add complexity to clinical encounters. Difficult family caregivers and dynamics may: derail consultation communication, reduce patient autonomy, and compromise effective clinical care. A paucity of practical strategies guiding effective clinician-family communication exists. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the first comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines (the TRIO guidelines) for oncology physicians and nurses to better manage several complex/challenging situations involving family members...
February 2, 2018: Patient Education and Counseling
Maria Lindqvist, Margareta Persson, Margareta Nilsson, Eva Uustal, Inger Lindberg
OBJECTIVE: this study explores women's experiences of the first two months after obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) during childbirth with a focus on problematic recovery. METHODS: this qualitative study used inductive qualitative content analysis to investigate open-ended responses from 1248 women. The data consists of short and comprehensive written responses to open-ended questions focusing on recovery in the national quality register, the Perineal Laceration Register, two months after OASIS at childbirth...
February 20, 2018: Midwifery
Marivic B Torregosa, Rosemary Sada, Ilse Perez
Globally, stroke is the leading cause of death and disease burden. While post-stroke studies have been conducted, they excluded survivors and caregivers from underserved communities. It can be argued that the impact of stroke on survivors and caregivers from underserved communities may be greater. Using qualitative exploratory research design, the purpose of this study was to examine the lived experiences of post-stroke recovery and readjustment among stroke survivors and stroke caregivers from an underserved community...
March 7, 2018: Nursing & Health Sciences
Abhishek Pandey, Kerry Littlewood, Larry Cooper, Julie McCrae, Michelle Rosenthal, Angelique Day, Liliana Hernandez
Custodial grandparenting can be especially challenging for older grandmothers facing age specific issues. Kinship navigator programs are social service delivery programs intended to inform grandparents and other relatives raising children about available resources and services, provide information specific to their individual needs, and help families navigate service systems. Our study utilizes self-report data from one kinship navigator federal demonstration project, which used a randomized control trial, to examine demographic characteristics for grandmothers under and over 55 years of age, whether grandmother caregivers (≥55 years) improve family resilience, social support, and caregiver self-efficacy, and which interventions improved outcomes for grandmothers (≥55 years)...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Women & Aging
Sally A Hageman, Anita J Tarzian, John Cagle
The costs of serious medical illness and end of life care are often a heavy burden for patients and families (Collins, Stepanczuk, Williams, & Rich, 2016 ; Kim, 2007 ; May et al., 2014 ; Zarit, 2004 ). Twenty-six practitioners, including social workers, managers/administrators, supervisors, and case managers from five health care settings, participated in qualitative semistructured interviews about financial challenges patients encountered. Seven practitioners took part in a focus group. Practitioners were recruited from hospice (n = 5), long-term care (n = 5), intensive care (n = 5), dialysis (n = 6), and oncology (n = 5)...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
Molly Knowles, Saba Khan, Deepak Palakshappa, Rachel Cahill, Evelyne Kruger, Bridget G Poserina, Brittany Koch, Mariana Chilton
Food insecurity, lack of access to enough food for an active and healthy life, is associated with poor child health. Three pediatric clinics implemented a two-question food insecurity screening of 7,284 families with children younger than five years. Over one thousand (1,133, 15.6%) reported food insecurity and 630 (55.6%) were referred to a benefits access organization for connection to public benefits and community resources. This study evaluated the efficacy of screening and referral through process evaluation, key informant interviews, and focus groups with 19 caregivers and 11 clinic staff...
2018: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Alex Collie, Sharon Newnam, Helen Keleher, Alan Petersen, Agnieszka Kosny, Adam P Vogel, Jason Thompson
Purpose Many industrialised nations have systems of injury compensation and rehabilitation that are designed to support injury recovery and return to work. Despite their intention, there is now substantial evidence that injured people, employers and healthcare providers can experience those systems as difficult to navigate, and that this can affect injury recovery. This study sought to characterise the relationships and interactions occurring between actors in three Australian injury compensation systems, to identify the range of factors that impact on injury recovery, and the interactions and inter-relationships between these factors...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Tara J Schapmire, Barbara A Head, Whitney A Nash, Pamela A Yankeelov, Christian D Furman, R Brent Wright, Rangaraj Gopalraj, Barbara Gordon, Karen P Black, Carol Jones, Madri Hall-Faul, Anna C Faul
A fragmented workforce consisting of multiple disciplines with varying levels of training and limited ability to work as a team often provides care to older adults. Interprofessional education (IPE) is essential for preparing practitioners for the effective teamwork required for community-based, holistic, person-centered care of the older adults. Despite numerous programs and offerings to advance education and interdisciplinary patient care, there is an unmet need for geriatric IPE, especially as it relates to community-dwelling older adults and caregivers in medically underserved areas...
2018: Advances in Medical Education and Practice
Paula Lozano, Amy Houtrow
Self-management improves health outcomes in chronic illness not only by improving adherence to the treatment plan but also by building the individual's capacity to navigate challenges and solve problems. Support for self-management is a critical need among children and adolescents with (medically and/or socially) complex chronic conditions. Self-management support refers to services that health systems and community agencies provide to persons with chronic illness and their families to facilitate self-management; it is a collaboration between the patient, family, and care providers...
March 2018: Pediatrics
M Mirza, A Krischer, M Stolley, S Magaña, M Martin
BACKGROUND: A large number of U.S. children are identified as having special health care needs (CSHCN). Despite parents' central role in managing their child's needs, many parents report difficulties in navigating service systems, finding information about their child's condition, and accessing health care and community resources. Therefore, there is a need for interventions that "activate" parents of children with special health care needs to increase their knowledge, skills, and confidence in managing, coordinating, and advocating for their child's needs...
February 27, 2018: Child: Care, Health and Development
Michelle Paradis, Katherine M Atkinson, Charles Hui, David Ponka, Douglas G Manuel, Paula Day, Malia Sq Murphy, Ruth Rennicks White, Kumanan Wilson
OBJECTIVES: Newcomers experience unique challenges with respect to vaccination, challenges that are compounded by the need to navigate complex vaccination catch-up schedules upon arrival in Canada. Our group has pioneered the development of CANImmunize, a free, bilingual, pan-Canadian digital application designed to empower individuals to manage their vaccination records. To inform how a vaccine tracking app, such as CANImmunize might be tailored to meet the unique needs of newcomers, this study sought to determine commonly spoken languages, technology use, and current methods of vaccine tracking among recent newcomers to Canada...
February 26, 2018: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics
Helena Cleeve, Carol Tishelman, Alastair Macdonald, Olav Lindqvist, Ida Goliath
While the study of objects in care contexts is an emerging research field, it is largely overlooked in end of life (EoL) care. In this study, we empirically and inductively explore the roles of objects at the EoL from the perspective of bereaved family members. Open individual interviews were conducted with 25 family members recruited from palliative in-patient and homecare units, as well as residential care facilities. After verbatim transcription, the interviews were analysed thematically. Based on these interviews, we conceptualise the roles of objects as relating to temporality, transformations of the everyday, and care...
February 26, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
Craig M Dale, Judy King, Reshma Amin, Sherri Katz, Douglas McKim, Jeremy Road, Louise Rose
Purpose: No studies have explored the experiences of Canadian mechanical ventilator-assisted adolescents (VAAs) living at home as they transition from paediatric to adult health providers. A better understanding of the needs of this growing population is essential to provide transition services responsive to VAAs and caregiver-identified needs. Methods: We conducted semistructured telephone interviews with adolescents and family caregivers who had recently initiated or completed transition to adult care recruited from three Canadian university-affiliated paediatric home ventilation programs...
August 2017: Paediatrics & Child Health
J Nicholas Dionne-Odom, Richard Taylor, Gabrielle Rocque, Carol Chambless, Thomas Ramsey, Andres Azuero, Nataliya Ivankova, Michelle Y Martin, Marie A Bakitas
CONTEXT: There is a scarcity of early palliative care interventions to support family caregivers of persons with advanced cancer living in the rural Southern U.S.. OBJECTIVE: Adapt the content, format, and delivery of a six session, palliative care, telehealth intervention with monthly follow-up for rural family caregivers to enhance their own self-care and caregiving skills. METHODS: Qualitative formative evaluation consisting of one-on-one, semi-structured interviews with rural-dwelling persons with metastatic cancer (n=18), their primary family caregiver (n=20), and lay patient navigators (n=26) were conducted to elicit feedback on a family caregiver intervention outline based on published evidence-based interventions...
February 20, 2018: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Emilia Aiello, Ainhoa Flecha, Olga Serradell
Whereas the topic of the 'cultural sensitivity' of healthcare systems has been addressed extensively in the US and the UK, literature on the subject in most European countries, specifically looking at the situation of Roma, is still scarce. Drawing on qualitative research conducted mainly in the city of Barcelona under the communicative approach with Roma subjects who have stable socioeconomic positions and higher cultural capitals (end-users, professionals of the healthcare system, and key informants of a regional policy oriented to the improvement of Roma living conditions), the present study aims to fill this gap...
February 22, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
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