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Parenteral nutrition in critical illness

Nestoras Nicolas Mathioudakis, Estelle Everett, Shuvodra Routh, Peter J Pronovost, Hsin-Chieh Yeh, Sherita Hill Golden, Suchi Saria
Objective: To develop and validate a multivariable prediction model for insulin-associated hypoglycemia in non-critically ill hospitalized adults. Research design and methods: We collected pharmacologic, demographic, laboratory, and diagnostic data from 128 657 inpatient days in which at least 1 unit of subcutaneous insulin was administered in the absence of intravenous insulin, total parenteral nutrition, or insulin pump use (index days). These data were used to develop multivariable prediction models for biochemical and clinically significant hypoglycemia (blood glucose (BG) of ≤70 mg/dL and <54 mg/dL, respectively) occurring within 24 hours of the index day...
2018: BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care
Nicolino Ambrosino, Michele Vitacca
Background: Progress in management has improved hospital mortality of patients admitted to the intensive care units, but also the prevalence of those patients needing weaning from prolonged mechanical ventilation, and of ventilator assisted individuals. The result is a number of difficult clinical and organizational problems for patients, caregivers and health services, as well as high human and financial resources consumption, despite poor long-term outcomes. An effort should be made to improve the management of these patients...
2018: Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine
Jeanine J Sol, Moniek van de Loo, Marit Boerma, Klasien A Bergman, Albertine E Donker, Mark A H B M van der Hoeven, Christiaan V Hulzebos, Ronny Knol, K Djien Liem, Richard A van Lingen, Enrico Lopriore, Monique H Suijker, Daniel C Vijlbrief, Remco Visser, Margreet A Veening, Mirjam M van Weissenbruch, C Heleen van Ommen
BACKGROUND: In critically ill (preterm) neonates, central venous catheters (CVCs) are increasingly used for administration of medication or parenteral nutrition. A serious complication, however, is the development of catheter-related thrombosis (CVC-thrombosis), which may resolve by itself or cause severe complications. Due to lack of evidence, management of neonatal CVC-thrombosis varies among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). In the Netherlands an expert-based national management guideline has been developed which is implemented in all 10 NICUs in 2014...
February 23, 2018: BMC Pediatrics
Sören Verstraete, Ilse Vanhorebeek, Esther van Puffelen, Inge Derese, Catherine Ingels, Sascha C Verbruggen, Pieter J Wouters, Koen F Joosten, Jan Hanot, Gonzalo G Guerra, Dirk Vlasselaers, Jue Lin, Greet Van den Berghe
BACKGROUND: Children who have suffered from critical illnesses that required treatment in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) have long-term physical and neurodevelopmental impairments. The mechanisms underlying this legacy remain largely unknown. In patients suffering from chronic diseases hallmarked by inflammation and oxidative stress, poor long-term outcome has been associated with shorter telomeres. Shortened telomeres have also been reported to result from excessive food consumption and/or unhealthy nutrition...
February 21, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Esther Barreiro
Skeletal muscle weakness is common in the intensive care units (ICU). Approximately 50% of patients under mechanical ventilation for more than 7 days show signs of ICU-acquired muscle weakness. In these patients, muscle weakness may be the result of axonal polyneuropathy, myopathy or a combination of both. The commonest risk factors in patients with ICU-acquired weakness (AW) are the severity and duration of the systemic inflammatory response, duration of the stay in the ICU and of mechanical ventilation, hyperglycemia, hypoalbuminemia, parenteral nutrition, and administration of corticosteroids and of neuromuscular blocking agents...
January 2018: Annals of Translational Medicine
Jinling Ma, Meng Gao, Rong Pan, Lei He, Lei Zhao, Jie Liu, Hongbin Liu
Adverse outcomes have been associated with hyperglycemia in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The relationship may be characteristic in elderly patients. However, limited data are available about the relationship between TPN-related hyperglycemia and cardiac adverse outcome in elderly patients without previously known diabetes. This study aims to identify whether there is an association between hyperglycemia and 45-day cardiac adverse outcomes in critically and noncritically ill elderly nondiabetic patients receiving TPN...
February 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
Zhongliang Yang, Guoqiang Tao, Meifeng Guo, Baoling Sun, Liang Gong, Yong Ding, Shuming Ye, Weidong Liu, Xiuyun Yang
OBJECTIVE: To explore efficacy and safety of simulated artificial pancreas in modulating stress hyperglycemia in critically ill patients. METHODS: A prospective randomized controlled study was performed. Seventy-two critically ill patients with stress hyperglycemia, aged 18-85 years, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score over 15, two consecutive random blood glucose 11.1 mmol/L or higher, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) below 0.065, unable to eat food for 3 days after inclusion, or only accepting parenteral nutrition, admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) in Shanghai Punan Hospital of Pudong New District from January 1st, 2015 to June 30th, 2017 were enrolled...
February 2018: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
Wen-Si Li, Zhang-Zhang Chen, Yi-Jun Zheng, Ming Zhong, Jie-Fei Ma, Li-Zhen Xuan, Jie-Qiong Song, Qian-Zhou Lv, Du-Ming Zhu
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the clinical outcomes in septic patients receiving parenteral fish oil. METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN: A prospective, non-randomized, observational clinical study was carried out in 112 patients with sepsis from March, 2013 to May, 2015 in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) of a tertiaryreferral hospital. The patients were put into one of two groups; either the control or the study group. Patients received the standard treatment of sepsis based on guidelines in the control group...
2018: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Emma J Ridley, Andrew R Davies, Rachael Parke, Michael Bailey, Colin McArthur, Lyn Gillanders, D James Cooper, Shay McGuinness
BACKGROUND: In the critically ill, energy delivery from enteral nutrition (EN) is often less than the estimated energy requirement. Parenteral nutrition (PN) as a supplement to EN may increase energy delivery. We aimed to determine if an individually titrated supplemental PN strategy commenced 48-72 hours following ICU admission and continued for up to 7 days would increase energy delivery to critically ill adults compared to usual care EN delivery. METHODS: This study was a prospective, parallel group, phase II pilot trial conducted in six intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand...
January 23, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Mette M Berger, Najate Achamrah, Claude Pichard
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Parenteral nutrition alone or as supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) has been shown to prevent negative cumulative energy balance, to improve protein delivery and, in some studies, to reduce infectious morbidity in ICU patients who fail to cover their needs with enteral nutrition alone. RECENT FINDINGS: The optimization of energy provision to an individualized energy target using either early parenteral nutrition or SPN within 3-4 days after admission has recently been reported to be a cost-saving strategy mediated by a reduction of infectious complications in selected intensive care patients...
January 19, 2018: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
Esther van Puffelen, Suzanne Polinder, Ilse Vanhorebeek, Pieter Jozef Wouters, Niek Bossche, Guido Peers, Sören Verstraete, Koen Felix Maria Joosten, Greet Van den Berghe, Sascha Cornelis Antonius Theodorus Verbruggen, Dieter Mesotten
BACKGROUND: The multicentre randomised controlled PEPaNIC trial showed that withholding parenteral nutrition (PN) during the first week of critical illness in children was clinically superior to providing early PN. This study describes the cost-effectiveness of this new nutritional strategy. METHODS: Direct medical costs were calculated with use of a micro-costing approach. We compared the costs of late versus early initiation of PN (n = 673 versus n = 670 patients) in the Belgian and Dutch study populations from a hospital perspective, using Student's t test with bootstrapping...
January 15, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Paul E Wischmeyer
Without doubt, in medicine as in life, one size does not fit all. We do not administer the same drug or dose to every patient at all times, so why then would we live under the illusion that we should give the same nutrition at all times in the continuum of critical illness? We have long lived under the assumption that critical illness and trauma lead to a consistent early increase in metabolic/caloric need, the so-called "hypermetabolism" of critical illness. What if this is incorrect? Recent data indicate that early underfeeding of calories (trophic feeding) may have benefits and may require consideration in well-nourished patients...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Tomoyuki Moriya, Kazuhiko Fukatsu, Midori Noguchi, Makoto Nishikawa, Hiromi Miyazaki, Daizoh Saitoh, Hideki Ueno, Junji Yamamoto
BACKGROUND: Enteral nutrition (EN) is the gold standard of nutritional therapy for critically ill or severely injured patients, because EN promotes gut and hepatic immunity, thereby preventing infectious complications as compared with parenteral nutrition. However, there are many EN formulas with different protein and fat contents. Their effects on gut-associated lymphoid tissue remain unclear. Recently, semielemental diets (SEDs) containing whey peptides as a nitrogen source have been found to be beneficial in patients with malabsorption or pancreatitis...
February 2018: Journal of Surgical Research
Jayshil J Patel, Martin D Rosenthal, Daren K Heyland
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Early enteral nutrition is recommended in critically ill adult patients. The optimal method of administering enteral nutrition remains unknown. Continuous enteral nutrition administration in critically ill patients remains the most common practice worldwide; however, its practice has recently been called into question in favor of intermittent enteral nutrition administration, where volume is infused multiple times per day. This review will outline the key differences between continuous and intermittent enteral nutrition, describe the metabolic responses to continuous and intermittent enteral nutrition administration and outline recent studies comparing continuous with intermittent enteral nutrition administration on outcomes in critically ill adults...
March 2018: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
Anitra C Carr, Patrice C Rosengrave, Simone Bayer, Steve Chambers, Jan Mehrtens, Geoff M Shaw
BACKGROUND: Vitamin C is an essential water-soluble nutrient which cannot be synthesised or stored by humans. It is a potent antioxidant with anti-inflammatory and immune-supportive roles. Previous research has indicated that vitamin C levels are depleted in critically ill patients. In this study we have assessed plasma vitamin C concentrations in critically ill patients relative to infection status (septic shock or non-septic) and level of inflammation (C-reactive protein concentrations)...
December 11, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Rulla Al-Araji, Rafeeq Muhammed
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 1, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Education and Practice Edition
Gregory J Roberti, Cameron G Cangelose, Robert G Martindale
Parenteral nutrition (PN), including lipids, in high-risk or poorly nourished critically ill patients is indicated when enteral nutrition is contraindicated; however, soybean oil-based PN can stimulate proinflammatory processes. Fish oil (FO) is generally less inflammatory and has recently been shown to be active in the resolution of inflammatory processes. In this study, we look at whether the use of a blended intravenous fat emulsion that includes soybean, medium-chain triglycerides, olive oil, and FO confers clinical benefits in critically ill patients...
November 2017: JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Catherine Ingels, Jan Gunst, Greet Van den Berghe
Sepsis induces profound neuroendocrine and metabolic alterations. During the acute phase, the neuroendocrine changes are directed toward restoration of homeostasis, and also limit unnecessary energy consumption in the setting of restricted nutrient availability. Such changes are probably adaptive. In patients not recovering quickly, a prolonged critically ill phase may ensue, with different neuroendocrine changes, which may represent a maladaptive response. Whether stress hyperglycemia should be aggressively treated or tolerated remains a matter of debate...
January 2018: Critical Care Clinics
Jean Reignier, Julie Boisramé-Helms, Laurent Brisard, Jean-Baptiste Lascarrou, Ali Ait Hssain, Nadia Anguel, Laurent Argaud, Karim Asehnoune, Pierre Asfar, Frédéric Bellec, Vlad Botoc, Anne Bretagnol, Hoang-Nam Bui, Emmanuel Canet, Daniel Da Silva, Michael Darmon, Vincent Das, Jérôme Devaquet, Michel Djibre, Frédérique Ganster, Maité Garrouste-Orgeas, Stéphane Gaudry, Olivier Gontier, Claude Guérin, Bertrand Guidet, Christophe Guitton, Jean-Etienne Herbrecht, Jean-Claude Lacherade, Philippe Letocart, Frédéric Martino, Virginie Maxime, Emmanuelle Mercier, Jean-Paul Mira, Saad Nseir, Gael Piton, Jean-Pierre Quenot, Jack Richecoeur, Jean-Philippe Rigaud, René Robert, Nathalie Rolin, Carole Schwebel, Michel Sirodot, François Tinturier, Didier Thévenin, Bruno Giraudeau, Amélie Le Gouge
BACKGROUND: Whether the route of early feeding affects outcomes of patients with severe critical illnesses is controversial. We hypothesised that outcomes were better with early first-line enteral nutrition than with early first-line parenteral nutrition. METHODS: In this randomised, controlled, multicentre, open-label, parallel-group study (NUTRIREA-2 trial) done at 44 French intensive-care units (ICUs), adults (18 years or older) receiving invasive mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support for shock were randomly assigned (1:1) to either parenteral nutrition or enteral nutrition, both targeting normocaloric goals (20-25 kcal/kg per day), within 24 h after intubation...
January 13, 2018: Lancet
Emma J Ridley, Andrew R Davies, Carol L Hodgson, Adam Deane, Michael Bailey, D Jamie Cooper
BACKGROUND: The amount of energy required to improve clinical outcomes in critically ill adults is unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the impact of near target energy delivery to critically ill adults on mortality and other clinically relevant outcomes. DESIGN: Following PRISMA guidelines, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomised controlled trials evaluating nutrition interventions in adult critical care populations...
October 9, 2017: Clinical Nutrition: Official Journal of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
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