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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28735521/myd88-erk-nfkb%C3%A2-pathways-and-pro-inflammatory-cytokines-release-in-periodontal-ligament-stem-cells-stimulated-by-porphyromonas%C3%A2-gingivalis
#1
Francesca Diomede, Maria Zingariello, Marcos F X B Cavalcanti, Ilaria Merciaro, Jacopo Pizzicannella, Natalia De Isla, Sergio Caputi, Patrizia Ballerini, Oriana Trubiani
The present study was aimed at investigating whether human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs) were capable of sensing and reacting to lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (LPS-G) which is widely recognized as a major pathogen in the development and progression of periodontitis. At this purpose hPDLCs were stimulated with 5 μg/mL LPS-G various times and the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was evaluated. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infections, and in particular TLR4, type-I transmembrane proteins, has been shown recognizing LPS-G...
May 24, 2017: European Journal of Histochemistry: EJH
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28724342/periodontal-disease-and-intra-amniotic-complications-in-women-with-preterm-prelabor-rupture-of-membranes
#2
Vladimira Radochova, Ivana Kacerovska Musilova, Martin Stepan, Peter Vescicik, Radovan Slezak, Bo Jacobsson, Marian Kacerovsky
OBJECTIVE: Periodontal disease is frequently suggested as a possible causal factor for preterm delivery. The link between periodontal disease and preterm delivery is a possible translocation of periopathogenic bacteria to the placenta and amniotic fluid as well as a systemic response to this chronic inflammatory disease. However, there is a lack of information on whether there is an association between clinical periodontal status in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) and the presence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and intra-amniotic inflammation (IAI)...
July 20, 2017: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28719012/the-impact-of-immunoglobulin-in-acute-hiv-infection-on-the-hiv-reservoir-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#3
J Tiraboschi, S Ray, K Patel, A Teague, M Pace, P Phalora, N Robinson, E Hopkins, J Meyerowitz, Y Wang, J Cason, S Kaye, J Sanderson, P Klenerman, S Fidler, J Frater, J Fox
OBJECTIVES: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) during acute HIV infection (AHI) restricts the HIV reservoir, but additional interventions are necessary to induce a cure. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is not HIV-specific but is safe and temporarily reduces the HIV reservoir in chronic HIV infection. We present a randomized controlled trial to investigate whether IVIG plus ART in AHI reduces the HIV reservoir and immune activation compared with ART alone. METHODS: Ten men with AHI (Fiebig II-IV) initiated ART (tenofovir, entricitabine, ritonavir boosted darunavir and raltegravir) at HIV-1 diagnosis and were randomized to ART alone or ART plus 5 days of IVIG, once virally suppressed (week 19)...
July 18, 2017: HIV Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28707083/layered-defense-how-mucus-and-tight-junctions-seal-the-intestinal-barrier
#4
REVIEW
Christopher T Capaldo, Domonica N Powell, Daniel Kalman
The colonic mucosa provides a vital defensive barrier separating the body from the microbial populations residing in the intestinal lumen. Indeed, growing evidence shows that loss of this barrier may cause disease or exacerbate disease progression. The loss of barrier integrity increases the translocation of bacterial antigens and stimulates inflammation in the intestinal mucosa, which is the central pathological feature of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). This review focuses on how intestinal mucus and intercellular tight junctions (TJs) act together to maintain the integrity of the colonic barrier and how barrier integrity is dysregulated in IBD...
July 13, 2017: Journal of Molecular Medicine: Official Organ of the "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte"
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28706459/beauvericin-a-cyclic-peptide-inhibits-inflammatory-responses-in-macrophages-by-inhibiting-the-nf-%C3%AE%C2%BAb-pathway
#5
Sulgi Yoo, Mi-Yeon Kim, Jae Youl Cho
Beauvericin (BEA), a cyclic hexadepsipeptide produced by the fungus Beauveria bassiana, is known to have anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial actions. However, how BEA suppresses macrophage-induced inflammatory responses has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we explored the anti-inflammatory properties of BEA and the underlying molecular mechanisms using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Levels of nitric oxide (NO), mRNA levels of transcription factors and the inflammatory genes inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and interleukin (IL)-1, and protein levels of activated intracellular signaling molecules were determined by Griess assay, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), luciferase reporter gene assay, and immunoblotting analysis...
July 2017: Korean Journal of Physiology & Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28687194/the-influence-of-the-commensal-microbiota-on-distal-tumor-promoting-inflammation
#6
REVIEW
Claire M Buchta Rosean, Melanie R Rutkowski
Commensal microbes inhabit barrier surfaces, providing a first line of defense against invading pathogens, aiding in metabolic function of the host, and playing a vital role in immune development and function. Several recent studies have demonstrated that commensal microbes influence systemic immune function and homeostasis. For patients with extramucosal cancers, or cancers occurring distal to barrier surfaces, the role of commensal microbes in influencing tumor progression is beginning to be appreciated. Extrinsic factors such as chronic inflammation, antibiotics, and chemotherapy dysregulate commensal homeostasis and drive tumor-promoting systemic inflammation through a variety of mechanisms, including disruption of barrier function and bacterial translocation, release of soluble inflammatory mediators, and systemic changes in metabolic output...
July 4, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28670966/malnutrition-in-hiv-infected-children-is-an-indicator-of-severe-disease-with-an-impaired-response-to-antiretroviral-therapy
#7
Maximilian Muenchhoff, Michael Healy, Ravesh Singh, Julia Roider, Andreas Groll, Chirjeev Kindra, Thobekile Sibaya, Angeline Moonsamy, Callum McGregor, Michelle Q Phan, Alejandro Palma, Henrik Kloverpris, Alasdair Leslie, Raziya Bobat, Philip S LaRussa, Thumbi Ndung'u, Philip Jr Goulder, Magdalena E Sobieszczyk, Mohendran Archary
Objectives This observational study aimed to describe immunopathogenesis and treatment outcomes in children with and without severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and HIV-infection. Design We studied markers of microbial translocation (16sDNA), intestinal damage (iFABP), monocyte activation (sCD14), T-cell activation (CD38, HLA-DR) and immune exhaustion (PD1) in 32 HIV-infected children with and 41 HIV-infected children without SAM prior to initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and cross-sectionally compared these children to 15 HIV-uninfected children with and 19 HIV-uninfected children without SAM...
July 2, 2017: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28668626/microrna-mediated-signaling-and-regulation-of-nutrient-transport-and-utilization
#8
REVIEW
Pei-Shan Chien, Chih-Bin Chiang, Zhengrui Wang, Tzyy-Jen Chiou
MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a group of small-RNA regulators, control diverse developmental processes and stress responses. Recent studies of nutrient-responsive miRNAs have offered novel insights into how plants regulate gene expression to coordinate endogenous demand and external availability of nutrients. Here, we review the mechanisms mediated by miRNAs to facilitate nutrient transport and utilization and show that miRNAs: first, control nutrient uptake and translocation by targeting nutrient transporters or their regulators; second, adjust nutrient metabolism by redistributing nutrients for biosynthesis of more essential compounds; and third, modulate root development and microbial symbiosis to exploit soil nutrients...
June 29, 2017: Current Opinion in Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28667632/monitoring-effector-translocation-using-the-tem-1-beta-lactamase-reporter-system
#9
Julie Allombert, Anne Vianney, Xavier Charpentier
Among the bacterial secretion systems, the Type III, IV, and VI secretion systems enable bacteria to secrete proteins directly into a target cell. This specific form of secretion, referred to as translocation, is essential for a number of pathogens to alter or kill targeted cells. The translocated proteins, called effector proteins, can directly interfere with the normal processes of the targeted cells, preventing elimination of pathogens and promoting their multiplication. The function of effector proteins varies greatly depending on the considered pathogen and the targeted cell...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28661459/macrophages-and-phospholipases-at-the-intersection-between-inflammation-and-the-pathogenesis-of-hiv-1-infection
#10
REVIEW
Francesca Spadaro, Serena Cecchetti, Laura Fantuzzi
Persistent low grade immune activation and chronic inflammation are nowadays considered main driving forces of the progressive immunologic failure in effective antiretroviral therapy treated HIV-1 infected individuals. Among the factors contributing to this phenomenon, microbial translocation has emerged as a key driver of persistent immune activation. Indeed, the rapid depletion of gastrointestinal CD4⁺ T lymphocytes occurring during the early phases of infection leads to a deterioration of the gut epithelium followed by the translocation of microbial products into the systemic circulation and the subsequent activation of innate immunity...
June 29, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28651949/%C3%AE-%C3%AE-t-cell-function-is-inhibited-in-end-stage-renal%C3%A2-disease-and-impacted-by-latent-tuberculosis%C3%A2-infection
#11
Jennifer A Juno, Jillian L M Waruk, Angela Harris, Christine Mesa, Carmen Lopez, Joe Bueti, T Blake Ball, Sandra A Kiazyk
Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are at elevated risk of acquiring infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB). Inflammation and uremia negatively impact immune function in this population, but specific pathways involved in TB immunity have not been identified. Although γδ T cells are known to contribute to protection from TB, their phenotype and function in patients with ESRD is relatively unknown. To determine this we recruited 20 patients with and 20 without ESRD (controls), with or without latent TB infection to assess γδ T cell frequency, surface phenotype, and cytokine production by flow cytometry in response to stimulation...
June 24, 2017: Kidney International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28645263/microbiota-dependent-metabolite-and-cardiovascular-disease-marker-trimethylamine-n-oxide-tmao-is-associated-with-monocyte-activation-but-not-platelet-function-in-untreated-hiv-infection
#12
Judith M Haissman, Anna K Haugaard, Sisse R Ostrowski, Rolf K Berge, Johannes R Hov, Marius Trøseid, Susanne D Nielsen
BACKGROUND: HIV infection is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease beyond that explained by traditional risk factors. Altered gut microbiota, microbial translocation, and immune activation have been proposed as potential triggers. The microbiota-dependent metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) predicts myocardial infarction (MI) in the general population and has recently been shown to induce platelet hyperreactivity. In the present study, we investigated if TMAO was associated with platelet function, microbial translocation, and immune activation in both untreated and combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) HIV infection...
June 23, 2017: BMC Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28642743/hiv-1-nef-signaling-in-intestinal-mucosa-epithelium-suggests-the-existence-of-an-active-inter-kingdom-crosstalk-mediated-by-exosomes
#13
REVIEW
Cristina Felli, Olimpia Vincentini, Marco Silano, Andrea Masotti
The human intestinal mucosal surface represents the first defense against pathogens and regulates the immune response through the combination of epithelial cell (EC) functions and immunological factors. ECs act as sensors of luminal stimuli and interact with the immune cells through signal-transduction pathways, thus representing the first barrier that HIV-1 virus encounters during infection. In particular, the HIV-1 Nef protein plays a crucial role in viral invasion and replication. Nef is expressed early during viral infection and interacts with numerous cellular proteins as a scaffold/adaptor...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28633064/an-innovative-approach-to-bioremediation-of-mercury-contaminated-soils-from-industrial-mining-operations
#14
Damien McCarthy, Grant C Edwards, Mae S Gustin, Andrew Care, Matthieu B Miller, Anwar Sunna
Soils contaminated with mercury (Hg) have proved expensive and logistically difficult to remediate. Research continues into finding suitable environmentally-friendly and efficient ways of achieving this end. Bioremediation is an option, which employs the strategies microorganisms have evolved to deal with Hg. One microbial strategy involves uptake and intracellular volatilisation of mercuric ions, which passively diffuse from the cell and back into the atmosphere. In this work, Pseudomonas veronii cells grown to stationary phase were immobilised in a xanthan gum-based biopolymer via encapsulation...
June 14, 2017: Chemosphere
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622393/giardia-co-infection-promotes-the-secretion-of-antimicrobial-peptides-beta-defensin-2-and-trefoil-factor-3-and-attenuates-attaching-and-effacing-bacteria-induced-intestinal-disease
#15
Anna Manko, Jean-Paul Motta, James A Cotton, Troy Feener, Ayodele Oyeyemi, Bruce A Vallance, John L Wallace, Andre G Buret
Our understanding of polymicrobial gastrointestinal infections and their effects on host biology remains incompletely understood. Giardia duodenalis is an ubiquitous intestinal protozoan parasite infecting animals and humans. Concomitant infections with Giardia and other gastrointestinal pathogens commonly occur. In countries with poor sanitation, Giardia infection has been associated with decreased incidence of diarrheal disease and fever, and reduced serum inflammatory markers release, via mechanisms that remain obscure...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621726/microbiota-and-probiotics-in-health-and-hiv-infection
#16
REVIEW
Chiara D'Angelo, Marcella Reale, Erica Costantini
Microbiota play a key role in various body functions, as well as in physiological, metabolic, and immunological processes, through different mechanisms such as the regulation of the development and/or functions of different types of immune cells in the intestines. Evidence indicates that alteration in the gut microbiota can influence infectious and non-infectious diseases. Bacteria that reside on the mucosal surface or within the mucus layer interact with the host immune system, thus, a healthy gut microbiota is essential for the development of mucosal immunity...
June 16, 2017: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600747/sodium-butyrate-protects-against-oxidative-stress-in-hepg2-cells-through-modulating-nrf2-pathway-and-mitochondrial-function
#17
Xingan Xing, Zheshu Jiang, Xue Tang, Panpan Wang, Yingrui Li, Yongjuan Sun, Guowei Le, Sixiang Zou
Sodium butyrate (NaBu) is a by-product of microbial fermentation of dietary fiber in the gastrointestinal tract and has been shown to increase the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase or heme oxidase-1, in vivo. However, the mechanism of this effect is still unclear. This study investigated the antioxidant effect of NaBu on HepG2 cells under H2O2-induced oxidative stress. NaBu (0.3 mM) attenuated cell death and accumulation of reactive oxygen species and improved multiple antioxidant parameters in H2O2-injured HepG2 cells...
June 10, 2017: Journal of Physiology and Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597812/microbial-impact-on-host-metabolism-opportunities-for-novel-treatments-of-nutritional-disorders
#18
Hubert Plovier, Patrice D Cani
Malnutrition is the cause of major public health concerns worldwide. On the one hand, obesity and associated pathologies (also known as the metabolic syndrome) affect more than 10% of the world population. Such pathologies might arise from an elevated inflammatory tone. We have discovered that the inflammatory properties of high-fat diets were linked to the translocation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We proposed a mechanism associating the gut microbiota with the onset of insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation, a phenomenon that we called "metabolic endotoxemia...
June 2017: Microbiology Spectrum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28582475/combined-plasma-elevation-of-crp-intestinal-type-fatty-acid-binding-protein-i-fabp-and-scd14-identifies-older-patients-at-high-risk-for-healthcare-associated-infections
#19
Paillaud Elena, Bastuji-Garin Sylvie, Plonquet Anne, Foucat Emile, Fournier Bénédicte, Boutin Emmanuelle, Le Thuaut Aurélie, Levy Yves, Hue Sophie
Background: We hypothesized that low-grade inflammation was driven by microbial translocation and associated with an increased risk of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Methods: We included 121 patients aged 75 years or over in this prospective cohort study. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), I-FABP, and sCD14 -- as markers for low-grade inflammation, intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, and monocyte activation, respectively -- were measured at admission...
June 3, 2017: Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28569153/aberrant-monocyte-responses-predict-and-characterize-dengue-virus-infection-in-individuals-with-severe-disease
#20
Yean K Yong, Hong Y Tan, Soe Hui Jen, Esaki M Shankar, Santha K Natkunam, Jameela Sathar, Rishya Manikam, Shamala D Sekaran
BACKGROUND: Currently, several assays can diagnose acute dengue infection. However, none of these assays can predict the severity of the disease. Biomarkers that predicts the likelihood that a dengue patient will develop a severe form of the disease could permit more efficient patient triage and allows better supportive care for the individual in need, especially during dengue outbreaks. METHODS: We measured 20 plasma markers i.e. IFN-γ, IL-10, granzyme-B, CX3CL1, IP-10, RANTES, CXCL8, CXCL6, VCAM, ICAM, VEGF, HGF, sCD25, IL-18, LBP, sCD14, sCD163, MIF, MCP-1 and MIP-1β in 141 dengue patients in over 230 specimens and correlate the levels of these plasma markers with the development of dengue without warning signs (DWS-), dengue with warning signs (DWS+) and severe dengue (SD)...
May 31, 2017: Journal of Translational Medicine
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