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Health valuation

Ioannis E Dagklis, Vasilis H Aletras, Efthymia Tsantaki, Anastasios Orologas, Dimitrios Niakas
An ongoing debate on decision and cost-utility analyses is whether to use preferences of general public or patients. The aim of this study was to replicate the valuation procedure of the multi-attribute utility generic measure, 15D, using a sample of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and to assess its psychometric properties. Consecutive outpatient MS patients were recruited from two MS centers in Greece. The three-stage valuation procedure was applied and, with the use of elicited preference weights, an MS patients' algorithm was developed...
September 30, 2016: Neurology International
Jacinto Mosquera Nogueira, Eva Rodríguez-Míguez
Alcohol dependence causes multiple problems not only for the person suffering dependence but also for others. In this study, the contingent valuation method is proposed to measure the intangible effects of alcohol dependence from the perspective of the persons directly involved: the patients and their relatives. Interviews were conducted with 145 patients and 61 relatives. Intangible effects of alcohol dependence were determined based on willingness to pay for a hypothetical treatment for dependence, with different success scenarios (100% and 50%)...
September 29, 2016: Adicciones
Feng Xie, Eleanor Pullenayegum, A Simon Pickard, Juan Manuel Ramos Goñi, Min-Woo Jo, Ataru Igarashi
Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are a promising alternative to more resource-intensive preference elicitation methods such as time trade-off (TTO), as pairwise comparisons are more amenable to online completion, which can save time and money. However, modeling DCE data produces latent utilities which are on an unknown scale. Therefore, latent utilities need to be transformed to a full health-dead scale before they can be used in quality-adjusted life year calculations. We aimed to explore transformation functions from DCE-derived latent utilities to TTO-derived health utilities...
October 16, 2016: Health Economics
Hans De Steur, Joshua Wesana, Dieter Blancquaert, Dominique Van Der Straeten, Xavier Gellynck
Building upon the growing interest and research on genetically modified (GM) biofortification, its socioeconomic potential has been increasingly examined. We conducted two systematic reviews and meta-analyses to provide comprehensive evidence of consumers' willingness to pay (11 economic valuation studies, 64 estimates) and cost-effectiveness/benefits (five economic evaluation studies, 30 estimates). Worldwide, consumers were willing to pay 23.9% more for GM biofortified food crops. Aside from crop and design-related differences, information provision was deemed crucial...
October 10, 2016: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
John Wildman, Peter McMeekin, Eleanor Grieve, Andrew Briggs
With an ageing population there is a move towards the use of assisted living technologies (ALTs) to provide social care and health care services, and to improve service processes. These technologies are at the forefront of the integration of health and social care. However, economic evaluations of ALTs, and indeed economic evaluations of any interventions providing both health benefits and benefits beyond health are complex. This paper considers the challenges faced by evaluators and presents a method of economic evaluation for use with interventions where traditional methods may not be suitable for informing funders and decision makers...
September 24, 2016: Social Science & Medicine
Katharine S Gries, Dean A Regier, Scott D Ramsey, Donald L Patrick
OBJECTIVE: To develop a statistical model generating utility estimates for prostate cancer specific health states, using preference weights derived from the perspectives of prostate cancer patients, men at risk for prostate cancer, and society. METHODS: Utility estimate values were calculated using standard gamble (SG) methodology. Study participants valued 18 prostate-specific health states with the five attributes: sexual function, urinary function, bowel function, pain, and emotional well-being...
October 4, 2016: Applied Health Economics and Health Policy
Katherine Rhoades, Sarah Telliard, Tiffany Stanfill Thomas, Jennifer L Barkin
OBJECTIVE: We examined 1) women's perceptions regarding self-care, 2) applications of self-care, and 3) barriers to practicing effective self-care. METHODS: Four focus groups were conducted in a low-income, pregnant population. Focus group recruitment and discussions took place at a large medical center in a medically underserved area of central Georgia. Thirty-two adult pregnant women attending a high-risk obstetric clinic were included. Data related to holistic self-care were identified and grouped into one of three categories: women's valuations of self-care, applications of self-care, and barriers to self-care...
September 30, 2016: Women's Health Issues: Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health
Keith M Marzilli Ericson, Amanda Starc
This paper examines the effect of choice architecture on Massachusetts' Health Insurance Exchange. A policy change standardized cost-sharing parameters of plans across insurers and altered information presentation. Post-change, consumers chose more generous plans and different brands, but were not more price-sensitive. We use a discrete choice model that allows the policy to affect how attributes are valued to decompose the policy's effects into a valuation effect and a product availability effect. The brand shifts are largely explained by the availability effect and the generosity shift by the valuation effect...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
Jean-Pascal Devailly, Laurence Josse
OBJECTIVE: Care programs in MPR formalize, for homogeneous profile of patients the steps of a multidisciplinary approach based on the rehabilitation potential and focused on improving functional status. The aim is to build a custom clinical pathway for patients with stroke followed in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Day Hospital by connecting each step systematically formalized a traceability tool in the information system in view a fair payment of a care program. MATERIAL/PATIENTS AND METHODS: Our outpatient hospital PMR team has built a clinical pathway according the method of the High Authority of Health, supported by MPR criteria defined by FEDMER and texts regulating the activity of French post-acute care (SSR)...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Huiting Liu, Lynne Lieberman, Elizabeth S Stevens, Randy P Auerbach, Stewart A Shankman
Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing minority groups in the United States; however, mental health within this population segment, particularly anxiety disorders, remains significantly understudied. Both the heterogeneity within the Asian American population and the multidimensional nature of anxiety contribute to difficulties in understanding anxiety in this population. The present paper reviewed two sources of heterogeneity within anxiety in Asian Americans: (1) cultural variables and (2) mechanisms or components of anxiety...
September 17, 2016: Journal of Anxiety Disorders
Angela Robinson, Anne E Spencer, José Luís Pinto-Prades, Judith A Covey
There is recent interest in using discrete choice experiments (DCEs) to derive health state utility values, and results can differ from time tradeoff (TTO). Clearly, DCE is "choice based," whereas TTO is generally considered a "matching" task. We explore whether procedural adaptations to the TTO, which make the method more closely resemble a DCE, make TTO and choice converge. In particular, we test whether making the matching procedure in TTO less "transparent" to the respondent reduces disparities between TTO and DCE...
September 19, 2016: Medical Decision Making: An International Journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making
Nikki McCaffrey, Billingsley Kaambwa, David C Currow, Julie Ratcliffe
BACKGROUND: Although a five level version of the widely-used EuroQol 5 dimensions (EQ-5D) instrument has been developed, population norms are not yet available for Australia to inform the future valuation of health in economic evaluations. The aim of this study was to estimate HrQOL normative values for the EQ-5D-5L preference-based measure in a large, randomly selected, community sample in South Australia. METHODS: The EQ-5D-5L instrument was included in the 2013 South Australian Health Omnibus Survey, an interviewer-administered, face-to-face, cross-sectional survey...
2016: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
Carrie Sessions, Spencer A Wood, Sergey Rabotyagov, David M Fisher
Land managers rely on visitation data to inform policy and management decisions. However, visitation data is often costly and burdensome to obtain, and provides a limited depth of information. In this paper, we assess the validity of using crowd-sourced, online photographs to infer information about the habits and preferences of recreational visitors by comparing empirical data from the National Park Service to photograph data from the online platform Flickr for 38 National Parks in the western United States...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Environmental Management
Thomas Butt, Adnan Tufail, Gary Rubin
Health state utility values are a major source of uncertainty in economic evaluations of interventions for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This review identifies and critiques published utility values and methods for eliciting de novo utility values in AMD. We describe how utility values have been used in healthcare decision making and provide guidance on the choice of utility values for future economic evaluations for AMD. Literature was searched using PubMed, and health technology assessments (HTA) were searched using HTA agency websites to identify articles reporting utility values or approaches to derive utility values in AMD and articles applying utilities for use in healthcare decision making relating to treatments for AMD...
September 15, 2016: Applied Health Economics and Health Policy
Gillian D Sanders, Peter J Neumann, Anirban Basu, Dan W Brock, David Feeny, Murray Krahn, Karen M Kuntz, David O Meltzer, Douglas K Owens, Lisa A Prosser, Joshua A Salomon, Mark J Sculpher, Thomas A Trikalinos, Louise B Russell, Joanna E Siegel, Theodore G Ganiats
IMPORTANCE: Since publication of the report by the Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine in 1996, researchers have advanced the methods of cost-effectiveness analysis, and policy makers have experimented with its application. The need to deliver health care efficiently and the importance of using analytic techniques to understand the clinical and economic consequences of strategies to improve health have increased in recent years. OBJECTIVE: To review the state of the field and provide recommendations to improve the quality of cost-effectiveness analyses...
September 13, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Nikki McCaffrey, Hareth Al-Janabi, David Currow, Renske Hoefman, Julie Ratcliffe
INTRODUCTION: Despite informal caregivers' integral role in supporting people affected by disease or disability, economic evaluations often ignore the costs and benefits experienced by this group, especially in the palliative setting. The purpose of this systematic review is to identify preference-based instruments for measuring care-related outcomes and provide guidance on the selection of instrument in palliative care economic evaluations. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A comprehensive search of the literature will be conducted from database inception (ASSIA; CINAHL; Cochrane library including DARE, NHS EED, HTA; Econlit; Embase; PsychINFO; PubMed)...
September 12, 2016: BMJ Open
Christoph M Rheinberger, Daniel Herrera-Araujo, James K Hammitt
We present an integrated valuation model for diseases that are life-threatening. The model extends the standard one-period value-per-statistical-life model to three health prospects: healthy, ill, and dead. We derive willingness-to-pay values for prevention efforts that reduce a disease's incidence rate as well as for treatments that lower the corresponding health deterioration and mortality rates. We find that the demand value of prevention always exceeds that of treatment. People often overweight small risks and underweight large ones...
August 29, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
Kai Huter, Ewa Kocot, Katarzyna Kissimova-Skarbek, Katarzyna Dubas-Jakóbczyk, Heinz Rothgang
BACKGROUND: The support of health promotion activities for older people gains societal relevance in terms of enhancing the health and well-being of older people with a view to the efficient use of financial resources in the healthcare sector. Health economic evaluations have become an important instrument to support decision-making processes in many countries. Sound evidence on the cost-effectiveness of health promotion activities would encourage support for the implementation of health promotion activities for older people...
2016: BMC Health Services Research
Minsu Ock, Jeonghoon Ahn, Seok-Jun Yoon, Min-Woo Jo
We estimated the disability weights in the South Korean population by using a paired comparison-only model wherein 'full health' and 'being dead' were included as anchor points, without resorting to a cardinal method, such as person trade-off. The study was conducted via 2 types of survey: a household survey involving computer-assisted face-to-face interviews and a web-based survey (similar to that of the GBD 2010 disability weight study). With regard to the valuation methods, paired comparison, visual analogue scale (VAS), and standard gamble (SG) were used in the household survey, whereas paired comparison and population health equivalence (PHE) were used in the web-based survey...
2016: PloS One
Georgi Iskrov, Svetlan Dermendzhiev, Tsonka Miteva-Katrandzhieva, Rumen Stefanov
BACKGROUND: Assessment and appraisal of new medical technologies require a balance between the interests of different stakeholders. Final decision should take into account the societal value of new therapies. OBJECTIVE: This perspective paper discusses the socio-economic burden of disease as a specific reimbursement decision-making criterion and calls for the inclusion of it as a counterbalance to the cost-effectiveness and budget impact criteria. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: Socio-economic burden is a decision-making criterion, accounting for diseases, for which the assessed medical technology is indicated...
2016: Frontiers in Pharmacology
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