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simulation AND nursing

Diane VonBehren, Molly M Killion, Carol Burke, Betsy Finkelmeier, Brigit Zamora
Three teams of perinatal expert nurses participated in planning and designing a new maternity unit, operationalizing the move to the new space, and evaluating care processes and workflows after the move. The hospitals involved were University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital, Prentice Women's Hospital of Northwestern Memorial Healthcare in Chicago, IL, and Florida Hospital Orlando, Florida Hospital for Women. Although each team discussed specific details and lessons learned, there is remarkable consistency among the experiences of these teams and with the discussion of the process by the team at Mercy Hospital St...
November 2016: MCN. the American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing
Sharon MacLean, Michelle Kelly, Fiona Geddes, Phillip Della
BACKGROUND: Registered nurses are expected to communicate effectively with patients. To improve on this skill education programmes in both hospital and tertiary settings are increasingly turning to simulation modalities when training undergraduate and registered nurses. The roles simulated patients (SPs) assume can vary according to training purposes and approach. AIMS: The first aim is to analyse how SPs are used in nursing education to develop communication skills...
September 28, 2016: Nurse Education Today
Mary Ann Cantrell, Bette Mariani, Colleen Meakim
The aim of this learning experience was to enhance students' knowledge of safety practices. A threefold approach was used, which involved viewing a prerecorded scenario in which safety practices were violated and another scenario that consistently depicted safe practice behaviors. Students then performed an environmental safety check of the physical simulated scene and then participated in a debriefing session. The conceptual basis for this project was the teaching-learning strategy "What's Wrong With This Patient," which requires the learner to evaluate a simulated learning environment to identify safety practices that were not followed and suggest strategies to correct these errors...
July 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Sherrill J Smith, Sharon Farra, Deborah L Ulrich, Eric Hodgson, Stephanie Nicely, William Matcham
AIM: The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal effects of virtual reality simulation (VRS) on learning outcomes and retention. BACKGROUND: Disaster preparation for health care professionals is seriously inadequate. VRS offers an opportunity to practice within a realistic and safe environment, but little is known about learning and retention using this pedagogy. METHOD: A quasiexperimental design was used to examine the use of VRS with baccalaureate nursing students in two different nursing programs in terms of the skill of decontamination...
July 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Kimberly K Gray, Susan K Grist, Deborah A Race
The development of a home care visit using a real apartment house is a unique approach to simulated learning experiences. This teaching strategy broadens the traditional simulation center approach by adding realism to the overall experience. The article explains how the use of the apartment house created a unique teaching strategy not otherwise available in traditional simulation center settings and helped junior-level nursing students understand the nuances of home care visits. On the basis of positive learning experiences, additional opportunities are being explored for using the apartment house at all clinical levels...
September 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Jaime Zinsmaster, Sally Vliem
Although current research suggests many positive outcomes with the use of high-fidelity simulation (HFS) in nursing education, little is known about the influence of HFS on knowledge retention. This quasiexperimental study examined the effects of HFS on student knowledge acquisition and retention, while validating the simulation quality with established tools on satisfaction, self-efficacy, educational practices, and simulation design. Results indicate that, although HFS had a statistically significant impact on knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention rates were not influenced...
September 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Heidi A Mennenga, Laurie Johansen, Becka Foerster, Lois Tschetter
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of senior baccalaureate nursing students and faculty members regarding telehealth and rural nursing concepts before and after participation in a newly developed simulation, which incorporated telehealth use in a rural home environment. Statistically significant increases in knowledge were found in both faculty and students following participation in the simulation. The results of this research indicate the need to increase student and faculty knowledge about telehealth and rural nursing concepts...
September 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Charys Kunkel, Wendy Kopp, Melissa Hanson
The use of simulation to provide end-of-life (EOL) education is a means to enhance self-efficacy levels among nursing students. The purpose of this exploratory study was to evaluate self-efficacy levels of nursing students and recent graduate nurses following an EOL simulation experience. Data were obtained using the Simulation Effectiveness Tool developed by Medical Education Technologies, Inc.; 72 participants in three groups completed the study. Moderate to strong levels of confidence in providing EOL care were found following the simulation experience; observations by the researcher and unsolicited participant statements supported the findings...
September 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Annette R Waznonis
AIM: A study was conducted to describe simulation debriefing practices of faculty in accredited, traditional, baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States. BACKGROUND: Best debriefing practices include debriefing by a competent facilitator in a safe environment using a structured framework. Yet, structured frameworks and evaluation of debriefing are lacking in nursing education. METHOD: This article reports the interview findings from the qualitative component of a large-scale mixed-methods study...
September 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Ellen Bamberger, Jacob Genizi, Nogah Kerem, Ayalla Reuven-Lalung, Niva Dolev, Isaac Srugo, Amnon Rofe
OBJECTIVE: Emotional intelligence (EI) is the individual's ability to perceive, understand and manage emotion and to understand and relate effectively to others. We examined the degree to which EI training may be associated with a change in EI among different medical personnel and patient satisfaction. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The EI of 17 physicians and 10 nurses in paediatric ward was prospectively evaluated with Bar-On's EI at baseline and after 18 months...
October 13, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood
Luciana Mara Monti Fonseca, Natália Del' Angelo Aredes, Ananda Maria Fernandes, Luís Manuel da Cunha Batalha, Jorge Manuel Amado Apóstolo, José Carlos Amado Martins, Manuel Alves Rodrigues
Objectives: to evaluate the cognitive learning of nursing students in neonatal clinical evaluation from a blended course with the use of computer and laboratory simulation; to compare the cognitive learning of students in a control and experimental group testing the laboratory simulation; and to assess the extracurricular blended course offered on the clinical assessment of preterm infants, according to the students. Method: a quasi-experimental study with 14 Portuguese students, containing pretest, midterm test and post-test...
October 10, 2016: Revista Latino-americana de Enfermagem
Adele Callaghan, Leigh Kinsman, Simon Cooper, Natalie Radomski
OBJECTIVES: Junior doctors are frequently the first doctor to be called by a nurse to review patients whose clinical status has declined in hospital wards, yet little is known about how well prepared they are to deal with this situation. This paper aims to identify the factors that influence junior doctors' early recognition and management of patient deterioration in an acute ward settings. METHOD: Integrative review methodology was used to allow for the inclusion of broad research designs, summarising current knowledge from existing research and identify gaps in the literature...
October 7, 2016: Australian Critical Care: Official Journal of the Confederation of Australian Critical Care Nurses
Melissa N Baginski
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 4, 2016: Nurse Educator
Shelby L Garner, Erin Killingsworth, Leena Raj
The purpose of this article was to describe an international partnership to establish and study simulation in India. A pilot study was performed to determine interrater reliability among faculty new to simulation when evaluating nursing student competency performance. Interrater reliability was below the ideal agreement level. Findings in this study underscore the need to obtain baseline interrater reliability data before integrating competency evaluation into a simulation program.
October 4, 2016: Nurse Educator
Ericka Sanner-Stiehr
Lateral violence among nurses persists as a pervasive problem in health care, contributing to detrimental individual and organizational consequences. Nurse educators can prepare students to respond effectively to lateral violence before they graduate and enter the workplace, where it is likely to be encountered. Simulation provides an effective platform for delivering this type of student-centered education. This article presents step-by-step guidelines for educators to integrate lateral violence response training into simulations in prelicensure nursing education...
October 5, 2016: Nurse Educator
Karin Page-Cutrara, Melanie Turk
BACKGROUND: Prebriefing is the introductory phase of the simulation process, however, little nursing education research is available on this aspect of simulation. Reflection theory and concept mapping informed a model-based structured prebriefing activity to prepare students for meaningful simulation learning. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the intervention of structured prebriefing for its effect on nursing students' competency performance, clinical judgment and their perceived prebriefing experience...
September 24, 2016: Nurse Education Today
Sarah Tinkler, Rajiv Sharma, Sudeshna Pal, Raven Susu-Mago, Miron Stano
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Access to primary care remains a problem for a substantial portion of the U.S. population, and is predicted to worsen due to an aging population and the increasing burden of chronic diseases. Better integration of nurse practitioners (NPs) into the primary care workforce is a possible solution. We examine offers of appointments with NPs if a requested primary care physician is unavailable. METHODS: Data are from a 2013 audit (simulated patient) study requesting appointment information from a national random sample of primary care physicians...
September 26, 2016: Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners
Lucia K Gonzales, Dale Glaser, Lois Howland, Mary Jo Clark, Susie Hutchins, Karen Macauley, Jacqueline F Close, Noelle Lipkin Leveque, Kim Reina Failla, Raelene Brooks, Jillian Ward
BACKGROUND: A number of studies across different disciplines have investigated students' learning styles. Differences are known to exist between graduate and baccalaureate nursing students. However, few studies have investigated the learning styles of students in graduate entry nursing programs. . OBJECTIVES: Study objective was to describe graduate entry nursing students' learning styles. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/METHODS: A descriptive design was used for this study...
September 28, 2016: Nurse Education Today
Mary LuAnne Lilly, Melinda Hermanns, Bill Crawley
In psychiatric-mental health, creating an innovative strategy to help students learn content that may not be frequently seen in a clinical setting is challenging. Thus, simulation helps narrow this gap. Using Kirkpatrick and Kirkpatrick's model of evaluation to guide the current study, faculty contacted baccalaureate nursing program graduates who completed a psychiatric-mental health clinical simulation scenario featuring a hanging suicide and wrist cutting suicide attempt scenario in the "Behind the Door" series as part of the clinical component of their undergraduate psychiatric-mental health course...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services
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