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Cognitive impairment in parkinson disease

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28813078/quality-of-life-in-parkinson-s-disease-patients-progression-markers-of-mild-to-moderate-stages
#1
Raissa Carla Moreira, Marise Bueno Zonta, Ana Paula Serra de Araújo, Vera Lúcia Israel, Hélio A G Teive
Objective: To investigate which factors are associated with the quality of life decline in Parkinson's disease patients from mild to moderate stages. Methods: The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 were used to evaluate clinical/functional data and the quality of life. Results: The markers of clinical/functional worsening were drooling (p < 0.004), need for assistance with hygiene (p = 0.02), greater freezing frequency (p = 0...
August 2017: Arquivos de Neuro-psiquiatria
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812419/the-effects-of-exergaming-and-treadmill-training-on-gait-balance-and-cognition-in-a-person-with-parkinson-s-disease-a-case-study
#2
Srikant Vallabhajosula, Amy K McMillion, Jane E Freund
BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly impairs posture, gait, and cognition. Exercise in the form of aerobic activity as well as exergaming may improve motor ability and cognition in persons with PD. Exergaming and treadmill training can be a practical form of exercise within the home; however, there is minimal research on this combined multimodal intervention for persons with PD. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effects of this combined intervention on cognition, balance, and gait in a person with PD through supervised lab sessions augmented by home-based sessions...
August 16, 2017: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812218/neural-correlates-of-emotional-valence-processing-in-parkinson-s-disease-dysfunction-in-the-subcortex
#3
Peter T Bell, Moran Gilat, James M Shine, Katie L McMahon, Simon J G Lewis, David A Copland
Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently accompanied by cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms including impairments in affective processing. Despite this, mechanisms underlying vulnerability to deficits in affective processing remain unclear. In this study, we utilized functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and an Affective Go-NoGo paradigm, to examine the neural correlates of emotional valence processing in PD. Results suggest that PD is associated with aberrant processing of emotional valence in subcortical limbic structures...
August 15, 2017: Brain Imaging and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811955/the-effects-of-group-based-versus-individual-based-tai-chi-training-on-nonmotor-symptoms-in-patients-with-mild-to-moderate-parkinson-s-disease-a-randomized-controlled-pilot-trial
#4
Jing Hui Yang, Ya Qun Wang, Sai Qing Ye, You Gen Cheng, Yu Chen, Xiao Zhen Feng
OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of group-based and individual-based Tai Chi training on nonmotor symptoms in patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease. DESIGN: Randomized controlled pilot study. METHODS: 36 community-dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) were randomly assigned to either group-based training group (n = 19) or individual-based group (n = 17). Both groups received same content of Tai Chi training 3 times a week for 13 weeks...
2017: Parkinson's Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811866/preliminary-data-on-the-interaction-between-some-biometals-and-oxidative-stress-status-in-mild-cognitive-impairment-and-alzheimer-s-disease-patients
#5
Ioana-Miruna Balmuș, Stefan-Adrian Strungaru, Alin Ciobica, Mircea-Nicusor Nicoara, Romeo Dobrin, Gabriel Plavan, Cristinel Ștefănescu
Increased interest regarding the biometal mechanisms of action and the pathways in which they have regulatory roles was lately observed. Particularly, it was shown that biometal homeostasis dysregulation may lead to neurodegeneration including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, or prion protein disease, since important molecular signaling mechanisms in brain functions implicate both oxidative stress and redox active biometals. Oxidative stress could be a result of a breakdown in metal-ion homeostasis which leads to abnormal metal protein chelation...
2017: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28808912/molecular-imaging-and-updated-diagnostic-criteria-in-lewy-body-dementias
#6
REVIEW
Nicolaas I Bohnen, Martijn L T M Müller, Kirk A Frey
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aims of the study were to review recent advances in molecular imaging in the Lewy body dementias (LBD) and determine if these may support the clinical but contested temporal profile distinction between Parkinson disease (PD) with dementia (PDD) versus dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). RECENT FINDINGS: There do not appear to be major regional cerebral metabolic or neurotransmitter distinctions between PDD and DLB. However, recent studies highlight the relative discriminating roles of Alzheimer proteinopathies...
August 14, 2017: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28808876/changes-of-cerebrospinal-fluid-a%C3%AE-42-t-tau-and-p-tau-in-parkinson-s-disease-patients-with-cognitive-impairment-relative-to-those-with-normal-cognition-a-meta-analysis
#7
Xiaohui Hu, Yan Yang, Daokai Gong
The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signature of reduced amyloid beta 1-42 (Aβ42), elevated total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau) is important for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ42, t-tau, and p-tau have been reported in numerous studies to contribute to predicting cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PDCI). However, no consistent conclusion can be drawn so far. Literatures regarding Aβ42, t-tau, and p-tau in CSF were systematically reviewed, and a meta-analysis was thus performed to evaluate the changes of these biomarkers in PDCI patients, including PD with mild cognitive impairment (PDMCI) and PD dementia (PDD) patients, relative to PD with normal cognition (PDNC) patients...
August 14, 2017: Neurological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28807493/homocysteine-and-cognitive-function-in-parkinson-s-disease
#8
Nicole Licking, Charles Murchison, Brenna Cholerton, Cyrus P Zabetian, Shu-Ching Hu, Thomas J Montine, Amie L Peterson-Hiller, Kathryn A Chung, Karen Edwards, James B Leverenz, Joseph F Quinn
INTRODUCTION: Increased plasma homocysteine (HC) is a risk factor for dementia in the general population. Levodopa therapy causes increased plasma HC, but it remains unclear whether elevated plasma HC is associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: The study population includes all participants in the Pacific Northwest Udall Center (PANUC) Clinical cohort at the time of the study, consisting of 294 individuals with PD who had a standardized neuropsychological assessment and plasma collection for HC measurement...
August 9, 2017: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28807457/identification-of-pseudobulbar-affect-symptoms-in-the-nursing-home-setting-development-and-assessment-of-a-screening-tool
#9
Carrie Allen, Barbara Zarowitz, Terrence O'Shea, Edward Peterson, Charles Yonan, Fanta Waterman
Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA) is a neurologic condition characterized by involuntary outbursts of crying and/or laughing disproportionate to patient mood or social context. Although an estimated 9% of nursing home residents have symptoms suggestive of PBA, they are not routinely screened. Our goal was to develop an electronic screening tool based upon characteristics common to nursing home residents with PBA identified through medical record data. Nursing home residents with PBA treated with dextromethorphan hydrobromide/quinidine sulfate (n = 140) were compared to age-, gender-, and dementia-diagnosis-matched controls without PBA or treatment (n = 140)...
August 11, 2017: Geriatric Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28805588/weight-in-parkinson-s-disease-phenotypical-significance
#10
Jagdish C Sharma, Anna Lewis
Body weight in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a significant nonmotor feature. Weight homeostasis is a complex physiological process and gets deranged in PD patients leading to changes in weight. While both the low and high body weight have been reported as risk factors for PD, the majority of PD patients have a lower weight and a subset of patients lose weight during the course of the disease, while a small proportion gain weight. A number of clinical parameters such as older age, impaired cognition, severity of disease, and an imbalance of food intake determined by satiety and hunger hormones have been reported to be associated with but not the cause of weight change...
2017: International Review of Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28805433/overriding-actions-in-parkinson-s-disease-impaired-stopping-and-changing-of-motor-responses
#11
Wery P M van den Wildenberg, K Richard Ridderinkhof, Nelleke C van Wouwe, Joseph S Neimat, Theodore R Bashore, Scott A Wylie
We administered a stop-change paradigm, an extended version of the stop task that requires (a) stopping an ongoing motor response and (b) changing to an alternative (change) response. Performance of a group of patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD) and taking dopaminergic medication was compared with that of matched healthy control (HC) participants. Behavioral results indicated that response latencies to the initial go signal did not distinguish between the 2 groups, but that stopping latencies were prolonged in PD patients...
August 14, 2017: Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28803382/cortical-afferent-inhibition-abnormalities-reveal-cholinergic-dysfunction-in-parkinson-s-disease-a-reappraisal
#12
REVIEW
Raffaele Nardone, Francesco Brigo, Viviana Versace, Yvonne Höller, Frediano Tezzon, Leopold Saltuari, Eugen Trinka, Luca Sebastianelli
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder affecting, besides the dopaminergic function, multiple neurotransmission systems, including the cholinergic system. Central cholinergic circuits of human brain can be tested non-invasively by coupling peripheral nerve stimulation with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of motor cortex; this test is named short latency afferent inhibition (SAI). SAI abnormalities have been reported in PD patients with gait disturbances and many non-motor symptoms, such as visual hallucinations (VHs), REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), dysphagia, and olfactory impairment...
August 12, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802937/apathy-in-parkinson-s-disease
#13
Javier Pagonabarraga, Jaime Kulisevsky
The normal maintenance of human motivation depends on the integrity of subcortical structures that link the medial and lateral prefrontal cortex with the limbic system. Apathy is highly prevalent in Parkinson's disease and causes major impact on the quality of life of patients and caregivers, comparable to depression or cognitive impairment. The clinical differentiation of apathy from the emotional symptoms of depression, and from difficulties in planning or organizing mental programs as a consequence of executive dysfunction, may guide a rationale for individualized treatment approach of apathetic symptoms, which is presently lacking...
2017: International Review of Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802930/quality-of-life-and-nonmotor-symptoms-in-parkinson-s-disease
#14
Paolo Barone, Roberto Erro, Marina Picillo
Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is defined as "the perception and evaluation by patients themselves of the impact caused on their lives by the disease and its consequences." HRQoL is conceptualized as a combination of physical, psychological, and social well-being in the context of a particular disease. Following earlier studies revolving on the impact of the classic motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease on HRQoL, mounting evidence have been produced that nonmotor symptoms (NMS) significantly and independently contribute to worse HRQoL...
2017: International Review of Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802929/caregiver-burden-and-the-nonmotor-symptoms-of-parkinson-s-disease
#15
Jon P Hiseman, Robin Fackrell
Parkinson's disease has traditionally been considered as primarily a motor disorder (Chaudhuri & Schapira, 2009). It is clear however that it is the burden of the nonmotor symptomatology which impacts significantly more highly on caregiver burden and quality of life (Benavides, Alberquerque, & Chana-Cuevas, 2013; Martinez-Martin, 2011). As Parkinson's disease advances there is an almost inevitable accrual of nonmotor symptoms alongside the motor aspects of the disease. Patients as their disease progresses require increasing support and this is not infrequently provided by an informal caregiver, most typically a spouse or family member (Martinez-Martin, Forjaz, Frades-Payo, et al...
2017: International Review of Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802919/nonmotor-signs-in-genetic-forms-of-parkinson-s-disease
#16
Meike Kasten, Connie Marras, Christine Klein
Although only a minority (i.e., ~5%) of Parkinson's disease (PD) cases is due to well-defined genetic causes, important clues about the common, "idiopathic" PD (iPD) can be garnered from monogenic model diseases. Nonmotor signs (NMS) are also present in monogenic PD and reviewed in this chapter for the confirmed PD genes SNCA, LRRK2, VPS35, Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, and the risk factor gene GBA. Within the context of the MDSGene database (www.mdsgene.org), we performed a systematic literature search and extracted information on cognitive decline, depression, psychotic signs and symptoms, autonomic signs and symptoms, anxiety, sleep disorder, and olfactory impairment...
2017: International Review of Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802918/genes-and-nonmotor-symptoms-in-parkinson-s-disease
#17
Ee-Wei Lim, Eng-King Tan
Published data on genetic risk factors of nonmotor symptoms (NMS) are relatively lacking since the first mutation responsible for Parkinson's disease (PD) being reported in 1996. This chapter provides a concise summary of genetic links to common individual NMS such as cognitive impairment, depression, psychosis, olfactory dysfunction, pain, and sleep disorders. Although some genetic variants such as apolipoprotein E and glucocerebrosidase demonstrate consistent links with certain NMS, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions...
2017: International Review of Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28799704/the-nature-consequences-and-management-of-neurological-disorders-in-chronic-kidney-disease
#18
REVIEW
Bahman Jabbari, Nosratola D Vaziri
Perhaps no other organ in the body is affected as often and in as many ways as the brain is in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Several factors contribute to the neurological disorders in CKD including accumulation of uremic toxins, metabolic and hemodynamic disorders, oxidative stress, inflammation, and impaired blood brain barrier among others. The neurological disorders in CKD involve both peripheral and central nervous system. The peripheral neurological symptoms of CKD are due to somatic and cranial peripheral neuropathies as well as a myopathy...
August 11, 2017: Hemodialysis International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28799502/mitochondrial-dynamics-and-proteins-related-to-neurodegenerative-diseases
#19
Athanasios Alexiou, Bilal Nizami, Faez Iqbal Khan, Georgia Soursou, Charalampos Vairaktarakis, Stylianos Chatzichronis, Vasilis Tsiamis, Vasileios Manztavinos, Nagendra Sastry Yarla, Ghulam Md Ashraf
Disruptions in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and the occurrence of proteins misfolding lead to neuronal death, resulting in Age-related Dementia and Neurodegenerative diseases as well as Frailty. Functional, neurophysiologic and biochemical alterations within the mitochondrial populations can reveal deficits in brain energy metabolism resulting in Mild Cognitive Impairment, abnormal neural development, autonomic dysfunction and other mitochondrial disorders. Additionally, in cases of Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease, a significant number of proteins seems to form unordered and problematic structures, leading through unknown mechanisms to pathological conditions...
August 10, 2017: Current Protein & Peptide Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797885/mitophagy-in-neurodegenerative-diseases
#20
REVIEW
Carlo Rodolfo, Silvia Campello, Francesco Cecconi
Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), are a complex "family" of pathologies, characterised by the progressive loss of neurons and/or neuronal functions, leading to severe physical and cognitive inabilities in affected patients. These syndromes, despite differences in the causative events, the onset, and the progression of the disease, share as common features the presence of aggregate-prone neuro-toxic proteins, in the form of aggresomes and/or inclusion bodies, perturbing cellular homeostasis and neuronal function (Popovic et al...
August 8, 2017: Neurochemistry International
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