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"Primary immunodeficiency"

Giuliana Giardino, Vera Gallo, Rosaria Prencipe, Giovanni Gaudino, Roberta Romano, Marco De Cataldis, Paola Lorello, Loredana Palamaro, Chiara Di Giacomo, Donatella Capalbo, Emilia Cirillo, Roberta D'Assante, Claudio Pignata
Increased risk of developing autoimmune manifestations has been identified in different primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). In such conditions, autoimmunity and immune deficiency represent intertwined phenomena that reflect inadequate immune function. Autoimmunity in PIDs may be caused by different mechanisms, including defects of tolerance to self-antigens and persistent stimulation as a result of the inability to eradicate antigens. This general immune dysregulation leads to compensatory and exaggerated chronic inflammatory responses that lead to tissue damage and autoimmunity...
2016: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Venetia Bigley, Dawn Barge, Matthew Collin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Dendritic cells are specialized antigen-presenting cells which link innate and adaptive immunity, through recognition and presentation of antigen to T cells. Although the importance of dendritic cells has been demonstrated in many animal models, their contribution to human immunity remains relatively unexplored in vivo.Given their central role in infection, autoimmunity, and malignancy, dendritic cell deficiency or dysfunction would be expected to have clinical consequences...
October 17, 2016: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Jeremy Woodward, Effrossyni Gkrania-Klotsas, Dinakantha Kumararatne
Chronic infection with Norovirus is emerging as a significant risk for patients with immunodeficiency - either primary or secondary to therapeutic immunosuppression. Patients with primary immunodeficiency present a range of pathological responses to Norovirus infection. Asymptomatic infections occur and differentiating viral carriage or prolonged viral shedding after self-limiting infection from infection causing protracted diarrhoea can be challenging due to relatively mild pathological changes that may mimic other causes of diarrhoea in such patients (for instance pathogenic bacteria or parasites or graft-versus-host disease)...
October 18, 2016: Clinical and Experimental Immunology
Siobhan O Burns, Alex Zarafov, Adrian J Thrasher
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are inherited conditions where components of the immune system are missing or dysfunctional. Over 300 genes have been causally linked to monogenic forms of PID, including a number that regulate the actin cytoskeleton. The majority of cytoskeletal defects disrupt assembly and disassembly of filamentous actin in multiple immune cell lineages impacting functions such as cell migration and adhesion, pathogen uptake, intercellular communication, intracellular signalling, and cell division...
October 5, 2016: Current Opinion in Hematology
Emily M Mace
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Human natural killer (NK) cell development is poorly understood; however, we gain important insight from cases of human primary immunodeficiency that affect the generation of mature human NK cell subsets. In this review, monogenic primary immunodeficiencies that highlight critical requirements for human NK cell development are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Increased resolution in NK cell phenotyping has revealed NK cell deficiencies that affect the distribution of NK cell subsets found in peripheral blood...
October 5, 2016: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Elena W Y Hsieh, Joseph D Hernandez
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review gives an overview of the systems-immunology single-cell proteomic and transcriptomic approaches that can be applied to study primary immunodeficiency. It also introduces recent advances in multiparameter tissue imaging, which allows extensive immune phenotyping in disease-affected tissue. RECENT FINDINGS: Mass cytometry is a variation of flow cytometry that uses rare earth metal isotopes instead of fluorophores as tags bound to antibodies, allowing simultaneous measurement of over 40 parameters per single-cell...
October 5, 2016: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Austen J J Worth, Charlotte J Houldcroft, Claire Booth
Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is ubiquitous in humans, but the majority of infections have an asymptomatic or self-limiting clinical course. Rarely, individuals may develop a pathological EBV infection with a variety of life threatening complications (including haemophagocytosis and malignancy) and others develop asymptomatic chronic EBV viraemia. Although an impaired ability to control EBV infection has long been recognised as a hallmark of severe T-cell immunodeficiency, the advent of next generation sequencing has identified a series of Primary Immunodeficiencies in which EBV-related pathology is the dominant feature...
October 17, 2016: British Journal of Haematology
Tasuku Suzuki, Yoji Sasahara, Atsuo Kikuchi, Humihiko Kakuta, Toshihiko Kashiwabara, Takashi Ishige, Yoshiko Nakayama, Masanori Tanaka, Akihiro Hoshino, Hirokazu Kanegane, Daiki Abukawa, Shigeo Kure
PURPOSE: Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a heterogeneous disorder caused by multiple factors. Although genetic and immunological analyses are required for a definitive diagnosis, no reports of a comprehensive genetic study of a Japanese population are available. METHODS: In total, 35 Japanese patients <16 years of age suffering from IBD, including 27 patients aged <6 years with very early-onset IBD, were enrolled in this multicenter study. Exome and targeted gene panel sequencing was performed for all patients...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Clinical Immunology
Ellen P Carlin, Nichole Giller, Rebecca Katz
OBJECTIVE: To quantify the population at risk of serious adverse reactions to replicating smallpox vaccine. DESIGN AND SAMPLE: Conditions known or suspected to carry risk were identified via Centers for Disease Control and Prevention planning documents, other federal publications, and peer-reviewed literature. Conditions identified were categorized as historically recognized risks or more recently recognized immunocompromised states that may pose risk. Major historical risk factors were as follows: eczema/atopic dermatitis, pregnancy, HIV, and primary immunodeficiency...
October 13, 2016: Public Health Nursing
Lesia K Dropulic, Howard M Lederman
Understanding the components of the immune system that contribute to host defense against infection is key to recognizing infections that are more likely to occur in an immunocompromised patient. In this review, we discuss the integrated system of physical barriers and of innate and adaptive immunity that contributes to host defense. Specific defects in the components of this system that predispose to particular infections are presented. This is followed by a review of primary immunodeficiency diseases and secondary immunodeficiencies, the latter of which develop because of a specific illness or condition or are treatment-related...
August 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Paola G Bronson, Diana Chang, Tushar Bhangale, Michael F Seldin, Ward Ortmann, Ricardo C Ferreira, Elena Urcelay, Luis Fernández Pereira, Javier Martin, Alessandro Plebani, Vassilios Lougaris, Vanda Friman, Tomáš Freiberger, Jiri Litzman, Vojtech Thon, Qiang Pan-Hammarström, Lennart Hammarström, Robert R Graham, Timothy W Behrens
Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Europeans. Our genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 1,635 patients with IgAD and 4,852 controls identified four new significant (P < 5 × 10(-8)) loci and association with a rare IFIH1 variant (p.Ile923Val). Peak new variants (PVT1, P = 4.3 × 10(-11); ATG13-AMBRA1, P = 6.7 × 10(-10); AHI1, P = 8.4 × 10(-10); CLEC16A, P = 1.4 × 10(-9)) overlapped with autoimmune markers (3/4) and correlated with 21 putative regulatory variants, including expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for AHI1 and DEXI and DNase hypersensitivity sites in FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells...
October 10, 2016: Nature Genetics
Wolfgang Frenzel, Stefan Wietek, Tor-Einar Svae, Anette Debes, Daniel Svorc
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the tolerability and safety of Octagam<sup>®</sup> 5% and 10% across all indications, ages, and treatment regimens, using data from four non-interventional post-authorization safety studies (PASS); this analysis was performed following changes in the preparation of raw material used to manufacture Octagam. METHODS: All four studies included in- and out-patients prescribed Octagam for treatment of their medical condition. Physicians used case report forms to document baseline demographics, Octagam treatment details, and data on the efficacy of Octagam, and recorded all adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and other safety data...
November 2016: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Thomas Altmann, Andrew R Gennery
DNA ligase IV deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency, LIG4 syndrome, often associated with other systemic features. DNA ligase IV is part of the non-homologous end joining mechanism, required to repair DNA double stranded breaks. Ubiquitously expressed, it is required to prevent mutagenesis and apoptosis, which can result from DNA double strand breakage caused by intracellular events such as DNA replication and meiosis or extracellular events including damage by reactive oxygen species and ionising radiation...
October 7, 2016: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
Kesava A Ramakrishnan, Reuben J Pengelly, Yifang Gao, Mary Morgan, Sanjay V Patel, E Graham Davies, Sarah Ennis, Saul N Faust, Anthony P Williams
BACKGROUND: Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD1) deficiency has recently been reported to cause a folate-responsive syndrome displaying a phenotype that includes megaloblastic anemia and severe combined immunodeficiency. OBJECTIVE: To describe our investigative approach to the molecular diagnosis and evaluation of immune dysfunction in a family with MTHFD1 deficiency. METHODS: The methods used were exome sequencing and analysis of variants in genes involved in the folate metabolic pathway in a family with 2 affected siblings...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in Practice
Elif Azarsız, Neslihan Karaca, Erturk Levent, Necil Kutukculer, Eser Sozmen
BACKGROUND: Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a rare clinically symptomatic primary immunodeficiency disorder which manifests a wide variability of symptoms, complications. Atherosclerosis in CVID patients have not been investigated yet contrary to other severe clinical complications. We aimed to investigate the chitotriosidase enzyme's role as an inflammation and atherosclerosis marker in pediatric CVID patients. METHODS: CVID patients (n =24) and healthy controls (n = 23) evaluated for chitotriosidase activity with other inflammation markers (hsCRP, myeloperoxidase, serum amyloid A, ferritin), lipid profile and echocardiographic findings (carotid artery intima media thickness - cIMT, brachial artery flow-mediated vazodilatation - FMD%)...
October 4, 2016: Annals of Clinical Biochemistry
Sonia Halioui-Louhaichi, Ons Azzabi, Nadia Mattoussi, Hasna Labiadh, Khadija Bousseta, Neji Tebib, Taher Gargah, Sayda Ben Becher, Mohamed Ridha Barbouch, Mohamed Bejaoui, Ahmed Maherzi
Background Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are a group of heterogeneous and relatively rare diseases. Aim to determine the clinical characteristics, outcome and genetic data of primary immunodeficiencies in pediatrics patients. Methods A retrospective, descriptive and multicentered study, enrolling 33 children presenting a PID in Tunis, during a period of 22 years (1991-2012). Resultats a masculine predominance has been noticed with a sex ratio at 2,3. Consanguinity was found in 71% of family cases. History of early infant deaths was found in 42% of cases...
April 2016: La Tunisie Médicale
Esmaeil Mortaz, Payam Tabarsi, Davod Mansouri, Adnan Khosravi, Johan Garssen, Aliakbar Velayati, Ian M Adcock
The life span of patients with primary and secondary immunodeficiency is increasing due to recent improvements in therapeutic strategies. While the incidence of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) is 1:10,000 births, that of secondary immunodeficiencies are more common and are associated with posttransplantation immune dysfunction, with immunosuppressive medication for human immunodeficiency virus or with human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection. After infection, malignancy is the most prevalent cause of death in both children and adults with (PIDs)...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
Samira Asgari, Paul J McLaren, Jane Peake, Melanie Wong, Richard Wong, Istvan Bartha, Joshua R Francis, Katia Abarca, Kyra A Gelderman, Philipp Agyeman, Christoph Aebi, Christoph Berger, Jacques Fellay, Luregn J Schlapbach
One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium mostly associated with health care-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
Aurélie Gabrion, Isabelle Hmitou, Despina Moshous, Bénédicte Neven, Alain Lefèvre-Utile, Jean-Sébastien Diana, Félipe Suarez, Capucine Picard, Stéphane Blanche, Alain Fischer, Marina Cavazzana, Fabien Touzot
BACKGROUND: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is primary immunodeficiency caused by defective production of reactive oxygen species in phagocytic cells that results in life-threatening infections and severe inflammatory manifestations. The treatment of inflammatory manifestations remains challenging, as it can be associated with an increased risk of infections. Previous studies have shown that CGD phagocytes display a defect in autophagy and a reactive oxygen species-independent activation of the inflammasome...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Angela R M Kurz, Monika Pruenster, Ina Rohwedder, Mahalakshmi Ramadass, Kerstin Schäfer, Ute Harrison, Gabriel Gouveia, Claudia Nussbaum, Roland Immler, Johannes R Wiessner, Andreas Margraf, Dae-Sik Lim, Barbara Walzog, Steffen Dietzel, Markus Moser, Christoph Klein, Dietmar Vestweber, Rainer Haas, Sergio D Catz, Markus Sperandio
Neutrophils need to penetrate the perivascular basement membrane for successful extravasation into inflamed tissue, but this process is incompletely understood. Recent findings have associated mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) loss of function with a human primary immunodeficiency disorder, suggesting that MST1 may be involved in immune cell migration. Here, we have shown that MST1 is a critical regulator of neutrophil extravasation during inflammation. Mst1-deficient (Mst1-/-) neutrophils were unable to migrate into inflamed murine cremaster muscle venules, instead persisting between the endothelium and the basement membrane...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Clinical Investigation
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