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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27932674/metabolic-adaptations-in-skeletal-muscle-after-84-days-bed-rest-with-and-without-concurrent-flywheel-resistance-exercise
#1
José Maria Irimia, Mario Guerrero, Paula Rodriguez-Miguelez, Joan Aureli Cadefau, Per A Tesch, Roser Cussó, Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalo
As metabolic changes in human skeletal muscle after long-term (simulated) spaceflight are not well understood, this study examined the effects of long-term microgravity, with and without concurrent resistance exercise on skeletal muscle oxidative and glycolytic capacity. Twenty-one men were subjected to 84 days head-down tilt bed rest with (BRE; n=9) or without (BR; n=12) concurrent flywheel resistance exercise. Activity and gene expression of glycogen synthase, glycogen phosphorylase (GPh), hexokinase, phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1) and citrate synthase (CS), as well as gene expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEFG), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1α) and myostatin, were analysed in samples from m...
December 8, 2016: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27930421/persistent-asymmetric-optic-disc-swelling-after-long-duration-space-flight-implications-for-pathogenesis
#2
Thomas H Mader, C Robert Gibson, Christian A Otto, Ashot E Sargsyan, Neil R Miller, Prem S Subramanian, Stephen F Hart, William Lipsky, Nimesh B Patel, Andrew G Lee
BACKGROUND: Several ophthalmic findings including optic disc swelling, globe flattening and choroidal folds have been observed in astronauts following long-duration space flight. The authors now report asymmetric choroidal expansion, disc swelling and optic disc morphologic changes in a 45-year-old astronaut which occurred during long-duration space flight and persisted following his space mission. METHODS: Case study of ocular findings in an astronaut documented during and after a long-duration space flight of approximately 6 months...
December 5, 2016: Journal of Neuro-ophthalmology: the Official Journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907194/preservation-of-multiple-mammalian-tissues-to-maximize-science-return-from-ground-based-and-spaceflight-experiments
#3
Sungshin Choi, Hami E Ray, San-Huei Lai, Joshua S Alwood, Ruth K Globus
BACKGROUND: Even with recent scientific advancements, challenges posed by limited resources and capabilities at the time of sample dissection continue to limit the collection of high quality tissues from experiments that can be conducted only infrequently and at high cost, such as in space. The resources and time it takes to harvest tissues post-euthanasia, and the methods and duration of long duration storage, potentially have negative impacts on sample quantity and quality, thereby limiting the scientific outcome that can be achieved...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885183/-osteoporosis-and-mechano-biosciences
#4
Toshio Matsumoto
Mechanical unloading due to long-term bedrest or microgravity during spaceflight causes a devastating influence on bone. Although bisphosphonates can prevent bone loss and hypercalciuria by mechanical unloading for up to 6 months, the influence of unloading for longer period of time is unknown. This is because mechanical loading is one of the most important stimuli for bone formation. Mechanical stress activates several intracellular signaling pathways. Among them, activation of stress-activated cation channel by fluid shear stress stimulates ERK-CREB signaling to enhance the expression of fos family transcription factors, which stimulates IL-11 expression in osteoblastic cells...
2016: Clinical Calcium
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27843335/incidence-of-clinical-symptoms-during-long-duration-orbital-spaceflight
#5
Brian Crucian, Adriana Babiak-Vazquez, Smith Johnston, Duane L Pierson, C Mark Ott, Clarence Sams
BACKGROUND: The environment of spaceflight may elevate an astronaut's clinical risk for specific diseases. The purpose of this study was to derive, as accurately as currently possible, an assessment of in-flight clinical "incidence" data, based on observed clinical symptoms in astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS). METHODS: Electronic medical records were examined from 46 long-duration ISS crew members, each serving approximately a 6-month mission on board the ISS, constituting 20...
2016: International Journal of General Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27817217/spaceflight-induced-changes-in-the-human-proteome
#6
Alexey S Kononikhin, Natalia L Starodubtseva, Lyudmila Kh Pastushkova, Daria N Kashirina, Kristina Yu Fedorchenko, Alexander G Brhozovsky, Igor A Popov, Irina M Larina, Evgeny N Nikolaev
Spaceflight is one of the most extreme conditions encountered by humans: Individuals are exposed to radiation, microgravity, hypodynamia, and will experience isolation. A better understanding of the molecular processes induced by these factors may allow us to develop personalized countermeasures to minimize risks to astronauts. Areas covered: This review is a summary of literature searches from PubMed, NASA, Roskosmos and the authors' research experiences and opinions. The review covers the available proteomic data on the effects of spaceflight factors on the human body, including both real space missions and ground-based model experiments...
November 21, 2016: Expert Review of Proteomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27806055/a-molecular-genetic-basis-explaining-altered-bacterial-behavior-in-space
#7
Luis Zea, Nripesh Prasad, Shawn E Levy, Louis Stodieck, Angela Jones, Shristi Shrestha, David Klaus
Bacteria behave differently in space, as indicated by reports of reduced lag phase, higher final cell counts, enhanced biofilm formation, increased virulence, and reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. These phenomena are theorized, at least in part, to result from reduced mass transport in the local extracellular environment, where movement of molecules consumed and excreted by the cell is limited to diffusion in the absence of gravity-dependent convection. However, to date neither empirical nor computational approaches have been able to provide sufficient evidence to confirm this explanation...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779949/autonomous-computer-based-behavioral-health-countermeasure-evaluation-at-hi-seas-mars-analog
#8
Allison P Anderson, Abigail M Fellows, Kim A Binsted, Mark T Hegel, Jay C Buckey
INTRODUCTION: Living in an isolated, confined environment (ICE) can induce conflict, stress, and depression. Computer-based behavioral health countermeasures are appealing for training and treatment in ICEs because they provide confidentiality and do not require communication with the outside environment. We evaluated the Virtual Space Station (VSS), a suite of interactive computer-delivered psychological training and treatment programs, at the Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) III expedition...
2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779600/lumbar-spine-paraspinal-muscle-and-intervertebral-disc-height-changes-in-astronauts-after-long-duration-spaceflight-on-the-international-space-station
#9
D G Chang, R M Healey, A J Snyder, J V Sayson, B R Macias, D G Coughlin, J F Bailey, S E Parazynski, J C Lotz, A R Hargens
STUDY DESIGN: Prospective case series. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate lumbar paraspinal muscle (PSM) cross-sectional area and intervertebral disc (IVD) height changes induced by a 6-month space mission on the International Space Station (ISS). The long-term objective of this project is to promote spine health and prevent spinal injury during space missions as well as here on Earth. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND: NASA crewmembers have a 4.3 times higher risk of herniated IVDs, compared to the general and military aviator populations...
October 25, 2016: Spine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27776994/combined-effects-of-antiorthostatic-suspension-and-ionizing-radiation-on-the-behaviour-and-neurotransmitters-changes-in-different-brain-structures-of-rats
#10
V S Kokhan, M I Matveeva, A S Bazyan, V S Kudrin, A Mukhametov, A S Shtemberg
Space flight factors (SFF) significantly affect the operating activity of astronauts during deep space missions. In contrast to an orbital flight, leaving the Earth's magnetic field is fraught with the dangers of exposure to ionizing radiation and more specifically, the high-energy nuclei component of galactic cosmic rays. Microgravity, just another critical non-radiation factor, significantly affects the normal functioning of the CNS. Some morphological structures of the brain, such as the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, that are rich in monoaminergic and acetylcholinergic neurones, are the most sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation and non-radiation spaceflight factors (SFF)...
October 21, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27732068/hydrogen-isotopic-composition-of-arctic-and-atmospheric-ch4-determined-by-a-portable-near-infrared-cavity-ring-down-spectrometer-with-a-cryogenic-pre-concentrator
#11
Y Chen, Kevin K Lehmann, Y Peng, L M Pratt, J R White, S B Cadieux, B Sherwood Lollar, G Lacrampe-Couloume, T C Onstott
In this study, near-infrared continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy was applied to the measurement of the δ(2)H of methane (CH4). The cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS) system consisted of multiple DFB laser diodes to optimize selection of spectral line pairs. By rapidly switching measurements between spectral line peaks and the baseline regions, the long-term instrumental drift was minimized, substantially increasing measurement precision. The CRDS system coupled with a cryogenic pre-concentrator measured the δ(2)H of terrestrial atmospheric CH4 from 3 standard liters of air with a precision of ±1...
October 2016: Astrobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27662786/the-effects-of-short-term-hypergravity-on-caenorhabditis-elegans
#12
Jenifer N Saldanha, Santosh Pandey, Jo Anne Powell-Coffman
As we seek to recognize the opportunities of advanced aerospace technologies and spaceflight, it is increasingly important to understand the impacts of hypergravity, defined as gravitational forces greater than those present on the earth's surface. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been established as a powerful model to study the effects of altered gravity regimens and has displayed remarkable resilience to space travel. In this study, we investigate the effects of short-term and defined hypergravity exposure on C...
August 2016: Life Sciences in Space Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27662782/review-and-analysis-of-over-40-years-of-space-plant-growth-systems
#13
REVIEW
P Zabel, M Bamsey, D Schubert, M Tajmar
The cultivation of higher plants occupies an essential role within bio-regenerative life support systems. It contributes to all major functional aspects by closing the different loops in a habitat like food production, CO2 reduction, O2 production, waste recycling and water management. Fresh crops are also expected to have a positive impact on crew psychological health. Plant material was first launched into orbit on unmanned vehicles as early as the 1960s. Since then, more than a dozen different plant cultivation experiments have been flown on crewed vehicles beginning with the launch of Oasis 1, in 1971...
August 2016: Life Sciences in Space Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27662353/elevated-end-tidal-pco2-during-long-duration-spaceflight
#14
Richard L Hughson, Nicholas J Yee, Danielle K Greaves
BACKGROUND: Elevated ambient Pco2 in the International Space Station (ISS) has been cited as a potential contributor to the vision impairment intracranial pressure syndrome (VIIP), a significant health risk for astronauts during long-duration space missions. The elevation in ambient Pco2 is rather modest and normal respiratory compensation could minimize the impact on arterial Pco2. METHODS: In nine male astronauts, breaths measured prior to a rebreathing maneuver were examined to assess inspired and end-tidal Pco2 during upright seated preflight and in-flight conditions...
2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27662351/screening-and-mitigation-of-layperson-anxiety-in-aerospace-environments
#15
Robert A Mulcahy, Rebecca S Blue, Johnené L Vardiman, Tarah L Castleberry, James M Vanderploeg
INTRODUCTION: Anxiety may present challenges for commercial spaceflight operations, as little is known regarding the psychological effects of spaceflight on laypersons. A recent investigation evaluated measures of anxiety during centrifuge-simulated suborbital commercial spaceflight, highlighting the potential for severe anxiousness to interrupt spaceflight operations. METHODS: To pave the way for future research, an extensive literature review identified existing knowledge that may contribute to formation of interventions for anxiety in commercial spaceflight...
2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27662346/distortion-product-otoacoustic-emissions-and-intracranial-pressure-during-csf-infusion-testing
#16
Michael A Williams, Jan Malm, Anders Eklund, Nicholas J Horton, Susan E Voss
BACKGROUND: A noninvasive method to monitor changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) is required for astronauts on long-duration spaceflight who are at risk of developing the Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure syndrome that has some, but not all of the features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. We assessed the validity of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to detect changes in ICP. METHODS: Subjects were eight patients undergoing medically necessary diagnostic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infusion testing for hydrocephalus...
2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27662345/flipping-a-switch-down-when-not-aligned-with-the-gravitational-vertical
#17
Otmar Bock, Nils Bury
INTRODUCTION: To flip a switch "down," our motor system can normally rely on concordant visual, gravitational, and egocentric cues about the vertical. However, divers must sometimes perform this task while visual cues are limited and gravitational cues are misaligned with egocentric cues. Astronauts must also flip switches "down" in absence of gravitational cues. Our study evaluates this ability using a laboratory simulation. METHODS: The subjects were 24 healthy volunteers who were blindfolded, tilted into different angles of roll, and asked to silence an alarm by flipping a switch "down...
2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27648494/elucidating-the-gravome-quantitative-proteomic-profiling-of-the-response-to-chronic-hypergravity-in-drosophila
#18
Ravikumar Hosamani, Ryan Leib, Shilpa R Bhardwaj, Christopher M Adams, Sharmila Bhattacharya
Altered gravity conditions, such as experienced by organisms during spaceflight, are known to cause transcriptomic and proteomic changes. We describe the proteomic changes in whole adult Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) but focus specifically on the localized changes in the adult head in response to chronic hypergravity (3 g) treatment. Canton S adult female flies (2 to 3 days old) were exposed to chronic hypergravity for 9 days and compared with 1 g controls. After hypergravity treatment, either whole flies (body + head) or fly-head-only samples were isolated and evaluated for quantitative comparison of the two gravity conditions using an isobaric tagging liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Proteome Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27634181/long-term-exposure-to-microgravity-impairs-vestibulo-cardiovascular-reflex
#19
Hironobu Morita, Chikara Abe, Kunihiko Tanaka
The vestibular system is known to have an important role in controlling blood pressure upon posture transition (vestibulo-cardiovascular reflex, VCR). However, under a different gravitational environment, the sensitivity of the vestibular system may be altered. Thus, the VCR may become less sensitive after spaceflight because of orthostatic intolerance potentially induced by long-term exposure to microgravity. To test this hypothesis in humans, we investigated the ability of the VCR to maintain blood pressure upon head-up tilt before and after a 4-6 months stay on the International Space Station...
2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27630185/microgravity-as-a-biological-tool-to-examine-host-pathogen-interactions-and-to-guide-development-of-therapeutics-and-preventatives-that-target-pathogenic-bacteria
#20
Ellen E Higginson, James E Galen, Myron M Levine, Sharon M Tennant
Space exploration programs have long been interested in the effects of spaceflight on biology. This research is important not only in its relevance to future deep space exploration, but also because it has allowed investigators to ask questions about how gravity impacts cell behavior here on Earth. In the 1980s, scientists designed and built the first rotating wall vessel, capable of mimicking the low shear environment found in space. This vessel has since been used to investigate growth of both microorganisms and human tissue cells in low shear modeled microgravity conditions...
November 2016: Pathogens and Disease
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