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Penetrating brain injury

Estelle Seyman, Hilla Shaim, Shani Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Tali Jonash-Kimchi, Natan M Bornstein, Hen Hallevi
BACKGROUND: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a common neurological event that causes varying degrees of disability. AIS outcome varies considerably, from complete recovery to complete loss of tissue and function. This diversity is partly explained by the compensatory ability of the collateral circulation and the ensuing cerebral flow grade. The collateral flow to the anterior circulation largely supplies the cortical areas. The deep brain tissue is supplied by penetrating arteries and has little or no collateral supply...
October 21, 2016: BMC Neurology
Lai Yee Leung, Ying Deng-Bryant, Katherine Cardiff, Megan Winter, Frank Tortella, Deborah Shear
BACKGROUND: Energy metabolic dysfunction is a key determinant of cellular damage following traumatic brain injury and may be worsened by additional insults. This study evaluated the acute/subacute effects of combined hypoxemia (HX) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) on cerebral interstitial levels of glucose, lactate, and pyruvate in a rat model of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). METHODS: Rats were randomly assigned into the sham control, PBBI, and combined injury (P + HH) groups...
November 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Michael R Hamblin
Photobiomodulation (PBM) describes the use of red or near-infrared light to stimulate, heal, regenerate, and protect tissue that has either been injured, is degenerating, or else is at risk of dying. One of the organ systems of the human body that is most necessary to life, and whose optimum functioning is most worried about by humankind in general, is the brain. The brain suffers from many different disorders that can be classified into three broad groupings: traumatic events (stroke, traumatic brain injury, and global ischemia), degenerative diseases (dementia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's), and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder)...
December 2016: BBA Clinical
Megan J Leonhard, Dagan A Wright, Rongwei Fu, David P Lehrfeld, Kathleen F Carlson
BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) greatly contributes to morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. We examined potential urban/rural disparities in mortality amongst Oregon pediatric patients with TBI treated in trauma hospitals. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of children ages 0-19 using the Oregon Trauma Registry for years 2009-2012. Geographic location of injury was classified using the National Center for Health Statistics Urban/Rural Classification Scheme...
December 2015: Injury Epidemiology
Tony Rosen, Sunday Clark, Elizabeth M Bloemen, Mary R Mulcare, Michael E Stern, Jeffrey E Hall, Neal E Flomenbaum, Mark S Lachs, Soumitra R Eachempati
INTRODUCTION: While geriatric trauma patients have begun to receive increased attention, little research has investigated assault-related injuries among older adults. Our goal was to describe characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of geriatric assault victims and compare them both to geriatric victims of accidental injury and younger assault victims. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the 2008-2012 National Trauma Data Bank. We identified cases of assault-related injury admitted to trauma centers in patients aged ≥60 using the variable "intent of injury...
September 3, 2016: Injury
Daniel W Spaite, Chengcheng Hu, Bentley J Bobrow, Vatsal Chikani, Bruce Barnhart, Joshua B Gaither, Kurt R Denninghoff, P David Adelson, Samuel M Keim, Chad Viscusi, Terry Mullins, Duane Sherrill
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Survival is significantly reduced by either hypotension or hypoxia during the out-of-hospital management of major traumatic brain injury. However, only a handful of small studies have investigated the influence of the combination of both hypotension and hypoxia occurring together. In patients with major traumatic brain injury, we evaluate the associations between mortality and out-of-hospital hypotension and hypoxia separately and in combination. METHODS: All moderate or severe traumatic brain injury cases in the preimplementation cohort of the Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care study (a statewide, before/after, controlled study of the effect of implementing the out-of-hospital traumatic brain injury treatment guidelines) from January 1, 2007, to March 31, 2014, were evaluated (exclusions: <10 years, out-of-hospital oxygen saturation ≤10%, and out-of-hospital systolic blood pressure <40 or >200 mm Hg)...
September 27, 2016: Annals of Emergency Medicine
Valerie McDonald, Katherina K Hauner, Aileen Chau, Frank Krueger, Jordan Grafman
Impulsivity is considered a multidimensional construct that encompasses a range of behaviors, including poor impulse control, premature decision-making, and the inability to delay gratification. In order to determine the extent to which impulsivity and its components share a common network, a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) analysis was performed in a large sample of patients (N = 131) with focal, penetrating traumatic brain injuries (pTBI). Impulsivity was assessed using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), a standard self-report measure that allows for unique estimates of global impulsivity and its factor analysis-derived components (e...
September 26, 2016: Human Brain Mapping
Gene A Grindlinger, David H Skavdahl, Robert D Ecker, Matthew R Sanborn
OBJECTIVE: To examine the clinical and neurological outcome of patients who sustained a severe non-penetrating traumatic brain injury (TBI) and underwent unilateral decompressive craniectomy (DC) for refractory intracranial hypertension. DESIGN: Single center, retrospective, observational. SETTING: Level I Trauma Center in Portland, Maine. PATIENTS: 31 patients aged 16-72 of either sex who sustained a severe, non-penetrating TBI and underwent a unilateral DC for evacuation of parenchymal or extra-axial hematoma or for failure of medical therapy to control intracranial pressure (ICP)...
2016: SpringerPlus
Ryo Momosaki, Shoji Kinoshita, Wataru Kakuda, Naoki Yamada, Masahiro Abo
The purpose of this study was to review the best available evidence of noninvasive brain stimulation, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for dysphagia after acquired brain injury. We searched randomized controlled trials that compared noninvasive brain stimulation with control used to improve dysphagia after acquired brain injury. We assessed dysphagia severity rating scales and penetration-aspiration scale as outcomes immediately after intervention...
2016: Journal of Medical Investigation: JMI
Mohammadreza Maghsoudi, Bita Shahbazzadegan, Arastoo Pezeshki
INTRODUCTION: Intracranial needles are rare entities. Intracranial foreign bodies due to non-missile intracranial penetrations are one of the most rarely encountered situations in neurosurgery. Sewing needles are among the more unusual foreign bodies that may be found in the brain. Although uncommon, foreign body cases are important and interesting. Foreign bodies enter the body through trauma or iatrogenic injuries. Needles are mostly inserted through fontanelles, cranial sutures, and more rarely through the orbits in infancy for the purpose of killing unwanted babies...
May 2016: Trauma Monthly
Nasya M Sturdivant, Sean G Smith, Syed F Ali, Jeffrey C Wolchok, Kartik Balachandran
Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema...
2016: Scientific Reports
Vikul Kumar, Atul Kumar Singh, Kulwant Singh Bhaikhel
Blowout fractures are a common occurrence in traumatic brain injury patients. In pediatric age group, orbital floor fracture is a common occurrence. We report a case of 2-year-old male admitted to trauma center, with penetrating injury to the left eye by the clutch of motorbike which fell on the child. Noncontrast computed tomography scan revealed fracture of the roof of left orbit with left frontal contusion sparing the left eyeball. There was also the continuous leak of brain matter from the left eye which suggested tear of dura mater...
April 2016: Journal of Pediatric Neurosciences
Ying Deng-Bryant, Lai Yee Leung, Krista Caudle, Frank Tortella, Deborah Shear
The Morris water maze (MWM) task is one of the most widely used and versatile tools in behavioral neuroscience for evaluating spatial learning and memory. With regard to detecting cognitive deficits following central nervous system (CNS) injuries, MWM has been commonly utilized in various animal models of neurotrauma, such as fluid percussion injury (FPI), cortical controlled impact (CCI) injury, weight-drop impact injury, and penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). More importantly, it serves as a therapeutic index for assessing the efficacy of treatment interventions on cognitive performance following neurotrauma...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Lai Yee Leung, Ying Deng-Bryant, Deborah Shear, Frank Tortella
Animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) provide important tools for studying the pathobiology of brain trauma and for evaluating therapeutic or diagnostic targets. Incorporation of additional insults such as hemorrhagic shock (HS) and/or hypoxemia (HX) into these models more closely recreates clinical scenarios as TBI often occurs in conjunction with these systemic insults (i.e., polytrauma). We have developed a rat model of polytrauma that combines penetrating TBI, HS and HX. Following brain trauma, HX was induced by reducing the inspired oxygen while HS was induced by withdrawing blood to lower the mean arterial pressure...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Ying Deng-Bryant, Ryan Readnower, Lai Yee Leung, Frank Tortella, Deborah Shear
The central nervous system (CNS) is protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) barrier that limit toxic agents and most molecules from penetrating the brain and spinal cord. However, these barriers also prevent most pharmaceuticals from entering into the CNS. Drug delivery to the CNS following neurotrauma is complicated. Although studies have shown BBB permeability increases in various TBI models, it remains as the key mitigating factor for delivering drugs into the CNS. The commonly used methods for drug delivery in preclinical neurotrauma studies include intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular delivery...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Hari Shanker Sharma, Dafin F Muresanu, José V Lafuente, Ala Nozari, Ranjana Patnaik, Stephen D Skaper, Aruna Sharma
The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) function in health and disease. Thus, in almost all neurodegenerative, traumatic or metabolic insults the BBB breakdown occurs to large molecules e.g., serum proteins. Entry of serum proteins into the brain fluid microenvironment leads to edema formation and subsequently cellular injuries. Accordingly, restoration of the BBB function using drugs will lead to neurorepair. However, injury to the brain occurring following blast, bullet wounds, or knife injury appears to initiate different set of pathophysiological responses...
September 2, 2016: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
Pavlos Pavlidis, Maria-Valeria Karakasi, Theodossios A Birbilis
Penetrating head injuries due to the use of screwdrivers as wounding agents in acts of interpersonal violence seldom occur. The aim of this article is to update and summarize the relevant literature on penetrating craniocerebral screwdriver stab wounds and to report a new case of screwdriver assault. A number of studies were reviewed to investigate the incidence, distribution, common findings, mechanism of injury, differential diagnostic criteria, complications, treatment, and prognosis of craniocerebral screwdriver stab injuries...
August 26, 2016: American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
Adán Pérez-Arredondo, Eduardo Cázares-Ramírez, Paul Carrillo-Mora, Marina Martínez-Vargas, Noemí Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Elvia Coballase-Urrutia, Radamés Alemón-Medina, Aristides Sampieri, Luz Navarro, Liliana Carmona-Aparicio
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an alteration in brain function, caused by an external force, which may be a hit on the skull, rapid acceleration or deceleration, penetration of an object, or shock waves from an explosion. Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with a high prevalence rate in pediatric patients, in which treatment options are still limited, not available at present neuroprotective drugs. Although the therapeutic management of these patients is varied and dependent on the severity of the injury, general techniques of drug types are handled, as well as physical and surgical...
August 25, 2016: Clinical Neuropharmacology
Yoshua Esquenazi, Giridhar P Kalamangalam, Omotola A Hope, Sonia N Krish, Jeremy Slater, Nitin Tandon
OBJECTIVE: The surgical management of epilepsy following penetrating gunshot wounds (GSWs) to the head has not been described in the modern; era. Given the extensive damage to the cranium and cortex from such; injuries, the safety and efficacy of surgical intervention is unclear. We; report the surgical strategy and outcomes following resections for; medically refractory epilepsy following GSWs in four patients. METHODS: A prospectively compiled database of 325 epilepsy patients was used to identify patients undergoing epilepsy surgery for medically; refractory epilepsy following a GSW to the brain...
August 18, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Mohammad Nasser, Fabienne Bejjani, Mohamad Raad, Hadi Abou El Hassan, Sarah Mantash, Amaly Nokkari, Naify Ramadan, Nouhad Kassem, Stefania Mondello, Eva Hamade, Hala Darwish, Kazem Zibara, Firas Kobeissy
Traumatic brain injury, often referred to as the "silent epidemic," is a non-degenerative, non-congenital insult to the brain due to a blow or penetrating object that disrupts the function of the brain leading to permanent or temporary impairment of cognition, physical and psychosocial functions. Traumatic brain injury usually has poor prognosis for long-term treatment and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide; approximately 10 million deaths and/or hospitalizations annually are directly related to traumatic brain injury...
August 14, 2016: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
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