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Enteric hyperoxaluria

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28764885/plasma-oxalate-in-relation-to-egfr-in-patients-with-primary-hyperoxaluria-enteric-hyperoxaluria-and-urinary-stone-disease
#1
Majuran Perinpam, Felicity T Enders, Kristin C Mara, Lisa E Vaughan, Ramila A Mehta, Nickolay Voskoboev, Dawn S Milliner, John C Lieske
BACKGROUND: Since plasma oxalate (POx) concentrations increase at lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR) levels, even among those without enteric (EH) or primary hyperoxaluria (PH), the appropriate thresholds for considering a disorder of oxalate metabolism are poorly defined. The current study was completed to establish relationships between POx, GFR, and urine oxalate excretion (UOx) among patients with PH, EH, and routine urinary stone disease (USD). METHODS: The most recent POx measurement on all Mayo Clinic patients between 2005 and 2015 were electronically pulled from the Lab Information System together with the closest serum creatinine within 14days and 24h urine study within 60days...
July 29, 2017: Clinical Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28739328/a-case-of-oxalate-nephropathy-when-a-single-cause%C3%A2-is%C3%A2-not%C3%A2-crystal-clear
#2
Sofia Marques, Sofia Santos, Kimberly Fremin, Agnes B Fogo
Hyperoxaluria can result in oxalate nephropathy with intratubular calcium oxalate crystallization and acute tubular injury. Primary inherited enzymatic deficiency or secondary causes such as excessive dietary intake, enteric increased absorption, or high doses of vitamin C, which is metabolized to oxalate, may underlie hyperoxaluria and oxalate nephropathy. We report a case of acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy in a patient using chelating therapy with oral ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), intravenous supplementation with vitamin C, and chronic diarrhea and discuss the potential kidney damage these factors can cause in particular settings...
July 21, 2017: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28552742/oxalobacter-formigenes-colonization-normalizes-oxalate-excretion-in-a-gastric-bypass-model-of-hyperoxaluria
#3
Benjamin K Canales, Marguerite Hatch
BACKGROUND: Hyperoxaluria and oxalate kidney stones frequently develop after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Oxalobacter formigenes can degrade ingested oxalate. OBJECTIVES: Examine the effect of O. formigenes wild rat strain (OXWR) colonization on urinary oxalate excretion and intestinal oxalate transport in a hyperoxaluric RYGB model. SETTING: Basic Science Laboratory, United States. METHODS: At 21 weeks of age, 28 obese male Sprague-Dawley rats survived Sham (n = 10) or RYGB (n = 18) surgery and were maintained on a 1...
July 2017: Surgery for Obesity and related Diseases: Official Journal of the American Society for Bariatric Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489752/enteric-hyperoxaluria-in-chronic-pancreatitis
#4
Nathalie Demoulin, Zaina Issa, Ralph Crott, Johann Morelle, Etienne Danse, Pierre Wallemacq, Michel Jadoul, Pierre H Deprez
Chronic pancreatitis may lead to steatorrhea, enteric hyperoxaluria, and kidney damage. However, the prevalence and determinants of hyperoxaluria in chronic pancreatitis patients as well as its association with renal function decline have not been investigated.We performed an observational study. Urine oxalate to creatinine ratio was assessed on 2 independent random urine samples in consecutive adult patients with chronic pancreatitis followed at the outpatient clinic from March 1 to October 31, 2012. Baseline characteristics and annual estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) change during follow-up were compared between patients with hyper- and normo-oxaluria...
May 2017: Medicine (Baltimore)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435765/chronic-nephropathy-from-dietary-hyperoxaluria-sustained-improvement-of-renal-function-after-dietary-intervention
#5
Yijuan Sun, Bruce L Horowitz, Karen S Servilla, Joanna R Fair, Darlene Vigil, Kavitha Ganta, Larry Massie, Antonios H Tzamaloukas
A 56-year-old man with stable chronic kidney disease (CKD) for two years following a single episode of calcium oxalate urolithiasis developed progressive elevation of his serum creatinine concentration. Urinalysis revealed pyuria and white cell casts, a few red blood cells, minimal proteinuria, and no crystals. Urine culture was sterile. Gallium scintigraphy was consistent with interstitial nephritis. Proton pump inhibitor intake was discontinued, and a short course of oral corticosteroids was initiated. Percutaneous kidney biopsy, performed because of the continued deterioration of renal function to a minimum estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) value of 15 mL/min per 1...
March 20, 2017: Curēus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28356078/calcium-oxalate-crystal-related-kidney-injury-in-a-patient-receiving-roux-en-y-hepaticojejunostomy-due-to-gall-bladder-cancer
#6
Jun-Li Tsai, Shang-Feng Tsai
BACKGROUND: Calcium oxalate nephropathy is rare in current practice. It was a common complication during jejunoileal bypass, but much less seen in modern gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. The major cause of it is enteric hyperoxaluria. CASE PRESENTATION: We report on a patient here with acute kidney disease due to calcium oxalate nephropathy, rather than the conditions mentioned above. The male patient received a Roux-en Y hepaticojejunostomy and common bile duct drainage...
March 29, 2017: BMC Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28217701/gut-microbiota-and-oxalate-homeostasis
#7
Marguerite Hatch
This perspective focuses on how the gut microbiota can impact urinary oxalate excretion in the context of hyperoxaluria, a major risk factor in kidney stone disease. In the genetic disease of Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 (PH1), an increased endogenous production of oxalate, due to a deficiency of the liver enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), results in hyperoxaluria and oxalate kidney stones. The constant elevation in urinary oxalate in PH1 patients ultimately leads to tissue deposition of oxalate, renal failure and death and the only known cure for PH1 is a liver or liver-kidney transplant...
January 2017: Annals of Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27960020/-the-hyperoxalurias
#8
Martino Marangella, Michele Petrarulo, Francesca Bermond, Cristina Marcuccio, Corrado Vitale
Oxalate (Ox) is an end-product of metabolism, important for poor solubility of its calcium salt in biological fluids. Ox can therefore be found in about 70% of urinary calculi. Hyperoxaluria (HOx) defined as Ox exceeding 0.5 mmol)/day, may cause nephrolithiasis/nephrocalcinosis and may be classified as dietary (DH), enteric (EH) or primary (PH). Fractional intestinal absorption of Ox is less than 10%, but increases to over 20% at calcium intakes below 200 mg/day. DH is often related to low-calcium diets. EH is caused by non-absorbed fatty acids which bind to calcium and lower its concentration in the intestinal lumen...
2016: Giornale Italiano di Nefrologia: Organo Ufficiale Della Società Italiana di Nefrologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27534874/from-chronic-kidney-disease-to-kidney-transplantation-the-impact-of-obesity-and-its-treatment-modalities
#9
REVIEW
Brian Camilleri, Julie M Bridson, Ajay Sharma, Ahmed Halawa
Obesity is associated with worse short-term outcomes after kidney transplantation but the effect on long-term outcomes is unknown. Although some studies have reported worse outcomes for obese recipients when compared to recipients with a BMI in the normal range, obese recipients who receive a transplant have better outcomes than those who remain wait-listed. Whether transplant candidates should be advised to lose weight before or after transplant has been debated and this is mainly due to the gap in the literature linking pre-transplant weight loss with better outcomes post-transplantation...
October 2016: Transplantation Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27410399/recurrence-of-hyperoxaluria-and-kidney-disease-after-combined-intestine-kidney-transplantation-for-enteric-hyperoxaluria
#10
Burcin Ekser, Richard S Mangus, Chandrashekhar A Kubal, Jonathan A Fridell, John A Powelson, Santosh Nagaraju, Plamen Mihaylov, Carrie L Phillips, Romil Saxena, William C Goggins
BACKGROUND: Enteric hyperoxaluria (EH) occurs with a rate of 5-24% in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, ileal resection and modern bariatric surgery. The excessive absorption of calcium oxalate causes chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with EH. In the literature, a single experience was reported in combined intestine-kidney transplantation (CIKTx) in patients with CKD due to EH. METHODS: After a report of 2 successful cases of CIKTx in patients with EH and CKD, one was performed at our center in a 59-year-old Caucasian female who developed intestinal failure with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) dependence after a complication post-bariatric surgery...
2016: American Journal of Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27191349/oxalate-inflammasome-and-progression-of-kidney-disease
#11
Theresa Ermer, Kai-Uwe Eckardt, Peter S Aronson, Felix Knauf
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Oxalate is an end product of metabolism excreted via the kidney. Excess urinary oxalate, whether from primary or enteric hyperoxaluria, can lead to oxalate deposition in the kidney. Oxalate crystals are associated with renal inflammation, fibrosis, and progressive renal failure. It has long been known that as the glomerular filtration rate becomes reduced in chronic kidney disease (CKD), there is striking elevation of plasma oxalate. Taken together, these findings raise the possibility that elevation of plasma oxalate in CKD may promote renal inflammation and more rapid progression of CKD independent of primary cause...
July 2016: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26645872/the-management-of-patients-with-enteric-hyperoxaluria
#12
REVIEW
John R Asplin
Enteric hyperoxaluria is a common occurrence in the setting of fat malabsorption, usually due to intestinal resection or intestinal bypass surgery. Enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary oxalate leads to elevated renal oxalate excretion, frequently in excess of 100 mg/d (1.14 mmol/d). Patients are at increased risk of urolithiasis and loss of kidney function from oxalate nephropathy. Fat malabsorption causes increased binding of diet calcium by free fatty acids, reducing the calcium available to precipitate diet oxalate...
February 2016: Urolithiasis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26614399/acute-oxalate-nephropathy-due-to-pancreatic-atrophy-in-newly-diagnosed-pancreatic-carcinoma
#13
Irfan Moinuddin, Asif Bala, Butool Ali, Husna Khan, Erika Bracamonte, Amy Sussman
Acute oxalate nephropathy can occur due to primary hyperoxaluria and secondary hyperoxaluria. The primary hyperoxalurias are a group of autosomal recessive disorders of endogenous oxalate overproduction. Secondary hyperoxaluria may occur as a result of excess dietary intake, poisoning with oxalate precursors (ethylene glycol), or enteric hyperoxaluria. The differential diagnosis of enteric hyperoxaluria includes inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, bariatric surgery (with jejunoileal bypass or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), celiac disease, partial colectomy, and chronic pancreatitis...
February 2016: Human Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26239907/oxalate-nephropathy-in-systemic-sclerosis-case-series-and-review-of-the-literature
#14
REVIEW
Colin B Ligon, Laura K Hummers, Zsuzsanna H McMahan
OBJECTIVE: To increase awareness of oxalate nephropathy as a cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) among systemic sclerosis patients with small intestinal dysmotility and malabsorption, and to prompt consideration of dietary modification and early treatment of predisposing causes of oxalate nephropathy in this population. METHODS: Two cases of biopsy-proven oxalate nephropathy were identified among systemic sclerosis patients in the course of direct clinical care. Subsequently, a retrospective search of the Johns Hopkins Pathology databases identified a third patient with systemic sclerosis who developed oxalate nephropathy...
December 2015: Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26088584/-urinary-stones-and-bowel-diseases-systematic-review
#15
REVIEW
B Pradere, B Peyronnet, C Brochard, É Le Balc'h, C Vigneau, L Siproudhis, O Traxer, K Bensalah
PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to explain the relationship between urinary stones and bowel disease. METHODS: A systematic review was performed on Medline, Embase and Cochrane using following keywords: urinary stones; urolithiasis; bowel; enteric and digestive. The literature selection was based on evidence and practical considerations. RESULTS: Fifty-three articles were selected. Three types of urolthiasis are mainly involved in digestive pathologies: calcium oxalate stones, uric acid and ammonium acid urate stones...
September 2015: Progrès en Urologie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25804778/-oxalate-a-poorly-soluble-organic-waste-with-consequences
#16
REVIEW
Yimin Lu, Olivier Bonny
Oxalate is a highly insoluble metabolic waste excreted by the kidneys. Disturbances of oxalate metabolism are encountered in enteric hyperoxaluria (secondary to malabsorption, gastric bypass or in case of insufficient Oxalobacter colonization), in hereditary hyperoxaluria and in intoxication (ethylene glycol, vitamin C). Hyperoxaluria causes a large spectrum of diseases, from isolated hyperoxaluria to kidney stones and nephrocalcinosis formation, eventually leading to kidney failure and systemic oxalosis with life-threatening deposits in vital organs...
March 25, 2015: Praxis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25701816/enteric-hyperoxaluria-an-important-cause-of-end-stage-kidney-disease
#17
REVIEW
Lama Nazzal, Sonika Puri, David S Goldfarb
Hyperoxaluria is a frequent complication of inflammatory bowel diseases, ileal resection and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and is well-known to cause nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. The associated prevalence of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is less clear but may be more consequential than recognized. In this review, we highlight three cases of ESKD due to enteric hyperoxaluria following small bowel resections. We review current information on the pathophysiology, complications and treatment of this complex disease...
March 2016: Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25374807/nephropathy-in-dietary-hyperoxaluria-a-potentially-preventable-acute-or-chronic-kidney-disease
#18
REVIEW
Robert H Glew, Yijuan Sun, Bruce L Horowitz, Konstantin N Konstantinov, Marc Barry, Joanna R Fair, Larry Massie, Antonios H Tzamaloukas
Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria...
November 6, 2014: World Journal of Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25269440/bifidobacterium-animalis-subsp-lactis-decreases-urinary-oxalate-excretion-in-a-mouse-model-of-primary-hyperoxaluria
#19
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Klara Klimesova, Jonathan M Whittamore, Marguerite Hatch
Hyperoxaluria significantly increases the risk of calcium oxalate kidney stone formation. Since several bacteria have been shown to metabolize oxalate in vitro, including probiotic bifidobacteria, we focused on the efficiency and possible mechanisms by which bifidobacteria can influence oxalate handling in vivo, especially in the intestines, and compared these results with the reported effects of Oxalobacter formigenes. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSM 10140 and B. adolescentis ATCC 15703 were administered to wild-type (WT) mice and to mice deficient in the hepatic enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (Agxt(-/-), a mouse model of Primary Hyperoxaluria) that were fed an oxalate-supplemented diet...
April 2015: Urolithiasis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24997827/therapeutic-effect-of-inulin-on-enteric-hyperoxaluria-in-rats
#20
Jing Tian, Jie Peng, Wei-hong Ge, Jun Zhang
OBJECTIVE: To observe the therapeutic effect of inulin on enteric hyperoxaluria in rats. METHODS: In experimental A, 24 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats received an oxalate-free diet on day 1, a high-oxalate diet (oxalate, 74.82 mg/100 g feed stuffs) on days 2 and 3, and plus 2 g inulin to each rat on day 3. The 24-hour urinary volume, concentrations of urinary oxalate and urine creatinine were measured, and 24-hour urinary oxalate excretion was calculated. In experimental B, 24 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally randomized into control group and inulin group, Each rat received a high oxalate diet (oxalate, 74...
June 2014: Zhongguo Yi Xue Ke Xue Yuan Xue Bao. Acta Academiae Medicinae Sinicae
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