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diabetic foot aureus

C Dunyach-Remy, C Courtais-Coulon, C DeMattei, N Jourdan, S Schuldiner, A Sultan, C Carrière, S Alonso, A Sotto, J-P Lavigne
AIMS: Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in diabetic patients may be a risk factor for diabetic foot lesion infections. The aims of this study were to compare the genotypic profiles of S. aureus strains isolated from nares and diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) using microarray technology. METHODS: Patients were included if they were admitted for diabetic foot infection (DFI) at any of three diabetology departments of Montpellier and Nîmes University Hospitals between 1 September 2010 to 30 June 2012...
October 5, 2016: Diabetes & Metabolism
Ayman Khalid Johargy
Objective: To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of the most common bacterial and fungal infections among infected diabetic patients. Methods: This study was conducted at the Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia, from June 2011 to June 2012, and comprised specimens collected from diabetics. Antibiotic susceptibility test using disc diffusion method was performed for bacterial isolates, and antifungal susceptibility test using colorimetric method for candida isolates...
October 2016: JPMA. the Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
Jean-Philippe Rasigade, Catherine Dunyach-Rémy, Anaïs Sapin, Nourredine Messad, Sophie Trouillet-Assant, Céline Dupieux, Jean-Philippe Lavigne, Frédéric Laurent
The mechanisms that drive the transition from commensality to invasiveness in Staphylococcus aureus are poorly understood. We recently reported that >50% of S. aureus isolates from uninfected diabetic foot ulcers in French patients harbor a prophage, namely ROSA-like, which is absent from invasive isolates from diabetic foot infections including osteomyelitis. Here we show that ROSA-like insertion abolishes the ability of S. aureus to replicate within osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, greatly reducing damage to infected cells...
September 16, 2016: Journal of Infectious Diseases
Bianca L Price, Andrew M Lovering, Frank L Bowling, Curtis B Dobson
Diabetes has major implications for public health, with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) being responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. A key factor in the development of non-healing ulcers is infection, which often leads to the development of biofilm, gangrene and amputation. A novel approach to treating DFUs is the local release of antibiotics from calcium sulfate beads. We have developed a novel model system to study and compare the release and efficacy of antibiotics released locally, using collagen as a substrate for biofilm growth, and incorporating serum to mimic the biochemical complexity of the wound environment...
September 12, 2016: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Matthew M Ramsey, Marcelo O Freire, Rebecca A Gabrilska, Kendra P Rumbaugh, Katherine P Lemon
Staphylococcus aureus-human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Kelly R Reveles, Bryson M Duhon, Robert J Moore, Elizabeth O Hand, Crystal K Howell
INTRODUCTION: Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are the leading cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in the United States. Antimicrobials active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are recommended in patients with associated risk factors; however, limited data exist to support these recommendations. Due to the changing epidemiology of MRSA, and the consequences of unnecessary antibiotic therapy, guidance regarding the necessity of empirical MRSA coverage in DFIs is needed...
2016: PloS One
Mohamed Ben Moussa, Mehdi Khalfallah, Ilhem Boutiba Ben Boubaker, Ramzi Nouira, Amine Slim, Hichem Jerraya, Chadli Dziri
BACKGROUND: Identifying the infecting bacterial flora is one of the main rules to be followed to ensure the success of antibiotherapy in the treatment of the infected diabetic foot. The aim of the work was to define the bacteriological profile of the bacteria causing the infection of the diabetic foot at the surgery unit B of Charles Nicolle's hospital in Tunis and determine the prognostic factors of this condition. METHODS: It was an open prospective study. It concerned 100 diabetic patients operated on for diabetic foot infection...
February 2016: La Tunisie Médicale
Raquel Santos, Diana Gomes, Hermes Macedo, Diogo Barros, Catarina Tibério, Ana Salomé Veiga, Luís Tavares, Miguel Castanho, Manuela Oliveira
Diabetic patients frequently develop diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), particularly vulnerable to Staphylococcus aureus opportunistic infections. It is urgent to find new treatments for bacterial infections. The antimicrobial peptide (AMP) nisin is a potential candidate, mainly due to its broad spectrum of action against pathogens. Considering that AMP can be degraded or inactivated before reaching their target at therapeutic concentrations, it is mandatory to establish effective AMP delivery systems, being the natural polysaccharide guar gum one of the most promising...
August 5, 2016: Journal of Medical Microbiology
R Fish, E Kutter, G Wheat, B Blasdel, M Kutateladze, S Kuhl
OBJECTIVE: Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) infections are a growing public health problem, with increasing prevalence, poor response to antibiotics and bacterial resistance to traditional antimicrobials leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Bacteriophages (phages), the viruses that target specific bacteria, are one option for addressing bacterial infections, especially where antibiotics fail. Of particular value is a class of virulent staphylococcal phages that hit almost all Staphylococcus aureus, including most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains...
July 2016: Journal of Wound Care
Catherine Dunyach-Remy, Christelle Ngba Essebe, Albert Sotto, Jean-Philippe Lavigne
Infection of foot ulcers is a common, often severe and costly complication in diabetes. Diabetic foot infections (DFI) are mainly polymicrobial, and Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent pathogen isolated. The numerous virulence factors and toxins produced by S. aureus during an infection are well characterized. However, some particular features could be observed in DFI. The aim of this review is to describe the role of S. aureus in DFI and the implication of its toxins in the establishment of the infection...
2016: Toxins
Monika Pobiega, Iwona Myjak, Monika Pomorska-Wesolowska, Dorota Romaniszyn, Grzegorz Ziólkowski, Agnieszka Chmielarczyk, Joanna Maciag, Anna Szczyptaf, Jadwiga Wójkowska-Mach
The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was investigated among infected diabetic foot ulcers in hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients in southern Poland to assess the virulence patterns and antimicrobial resistance among these strains. MRSA was detected in 10.3% of all studied isolates, from the hospitalized patients only. The rest of the isolates was methicillin susceptible. The minimal inhibitory concentration that inhibits 50% of bacterial isolates (MIC50) for vancomycin was 1...
June 24, 2016: Current Vascular Pharmacology
Carla Mottola, Carina S Matias, João J Mendes, José Melo-Cristino, Luís Tavares, Patrícia Cavaco-Silva, Manuela Oliveira
BACKGROUND: Foot infections are a major cause of morbidity in people with diabetes and the most common cause of diabetes-related hospitalization and lower extremity amputation. Staphylococcus aureus is by far the most frequent species isolated from these infections. In particular, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major clinical and epidemiological problem in hospitals. MRSA strains have the ability to be resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics, but also to a wide range of other antimicrobials, making infections difficult to manage and very costly to treat...
June 23, 2016: BMC Microbiology
Abubakar Amali Muhammad, Palanisamy Arulselvan, Pike See Cheah, Farida Abas, Sharida Fakurazi
Diabetic foot ulcer is a serious complication of diabetes, which affects a significant percentage (15%) of diabetics and up to 15%-24% of those affected may require amputation. Therefore, the economic burden of diabetic foot ulcers is enormous and is associated with high cost of treatment and prolongs hospitalization. The present study was conducted to evaluate antibacterial and in vivo wound healing activities of an aqueous fraction of Moringa oleifera on a diabetic condition. Antibacterial activity testing was carried out using agar well and tube dilution techniques...
2016: Drug Design, Development and Therapy
Alessandro Mantovani, Maddalena Trombetta, Chiara Imbriaco, Riccardo Rigolon, Lucia Mingolla, Federica Zamboni, Francesca Dal Molin, Dario Cioccoloni, Viola Sanga, Massimiliano Bruti, Enrico Brocco, Michela Conti, Giorgio Ravenna, Fabrizia Perrone, Vincenzo Stoico, Enzo Bonora
UNLABELLED: Vertebral osteomyelitis (or spondylodiscitis) is steadily increasing in Western countries and often results from hematogenous seeding, direct inoculation during spinal surgery, or contiguous spread from an infection in the adjacent soft tissue. We present the case of a 67-year-old white patient with type 2 diabetes who went to Hospital for high fever, back pain, and worsening of known infected ulcers in the left foot. Despite intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement of the foot infection, high fever and lower back pain continued...
2016: Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism Case Reports
Aycan Gündoğdu, Hüseyin Kılıç, Ayşegül Ulu Kılıç, Mzia Kutateladze
Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) may represent a wide clinical spectrum from cellulitis to high-mortality associated necrotizing fasciitis. Limitations in therapy due to the multiple drug resistance, leads to increase in the morbidity and mortality rates, especially in complicated SSTIs such as diabetic foot, decubitus, and surgical wound infections. Therefore, alternative treatment strategies other than antibiotics are needed in appropriate clinical conditions. "Bacteriophage therapy", which is an old method and has been used as part of standard treatment in some countries such as Georgia and Russia, has again become popular worldwide...
April 2016: Mikrobiyoloji Bülteni
Ayesha Nageen
OBJECTIVE: To find the most prevalent organism in diabetic foot ulcers and its drug sensitivity and resistance to different standard antibiotics. STUDY DESIGN: Adescriptive and cross-sectional study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Ward 7, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center, Karachi, from December 2010 to December 2012. METHODOLOGY: Ninety-five diabetic patients with infected foot wounds of Wegener grade 2 - 5 who had not received any previous antibiotics were included in the study by consecutive sampling...
April 2016: Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons—Pakistan: JCPSP
Karen Smith, Andrew Collier, Eleanor M Townsend, Lindsay E O'Donnell, Abhijit M Bal, John Butcher, William G Mackay, Gordon Ramage, Craig Williams
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to characterise the microbiome of new and recurrent diabetic foot ulcers using 16S amplicon sequencing (16S AS), allowing the identification of a wider range of bacterial species that may be important in the development of chronicity in these debilitating wounds. Twenty patients not receiving antibiotics for the past three months were selected, with swabs taken from each individual for culture and 16S AS. DNA was isolated using a combination of bead beating and kit extraction...
2016: BMC Microbiology
Waqas Nasir Chaudhry, Rabia Badar, Muhsin Jamal, Jason Jeong, Jamal Zafar, Saadia Andleeb
Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) constitute a major complication of diabetes mellitus. DFIs contribute to the development of gangrene and non-traumatic lower extremity amputations with a lifetime risk of up to 25%. The aim of the present study was to identify the presence of neuropathy and determine the ulcer grade, microbial profile and phenotypic and genotypic prevalence of the methicillin-resistance gene mecA and extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-encoding genes in bacterial isolates of DFI in patients registered at the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (Islamabad, Pakistan)...
March 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Bouchra Belefquih, Mohammed Frikh, Yasssine Benlahlou, Adil Maleh, Lamiaa Jadid, Fatna Bssaibis, Mohammed Ghazouani, Belkacem Chagar, Jamal Lamsaouri, Abdelhay Lemnouer, Mostafa Elouennass
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this work is to describe the microbiology of diabetic foot infections (DFIs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors included all samples of infected diabetic foot ulcers between January 2009 and June 2014 at the Mohammed Vth Military Teaching Hospital of Rabat, Morocco. RESULTS: The researchers collected 199 samples corresponding to 157 patients. The mean age of the patients was 59 years ± 12 years. Of the collected samples, deep samples represented 41% and swab samples 59%...
March 2016: Wounds: a Compendium of Clinical Research and Practice
Mustafa Hatipoglu, Mesut Mutluoglu, Vedat Turhan, Gunalp Uzun, Benjamin A Lipsky, Erol Sevim, Hayati Demiraslan, Esma Eryilmaz, Cem Ozuguz, Ali Memis, Hakan Ay, Bilgin Arda, Serhat Uysal, Vicdan Koksaldi Motor, Cigdem Kader, Ayse Erturk, Omer Coskun, Fazilet Duygu, Selma Guler, Fatma Aybala Altay, Aziz Ogutlu, Sibel Bolukcu, Senol Yildiz, Ozlem Kandemir, Halide Aslaner, Arife Polat, Mustafa K Karahocagil, Kadriye Kart Yasar, Emine Sehmen, Sirri Kilic, Mustafa Sunbul, Serap Gencer, Fatma Bozkurt, Tugba Yanik, Nefise Oztoprak, Ayse Batirel, Hamdi Sozen, Inci Kilic, Ilhami Celik, Bengisu Ay, Selma Tosun, Ayten Kadanali, Senol Çomoglu, Affan Denk, Salih Hosoglu, Ozlem Aydin, Nazif Elaldi, Serife Akalin, Bahar Kandemir, Ayhan Akbulut, Tuna Demirdal, Recep Balik, Emel Azak, Gonul Sengoz
AIM: Clinical practice guidelines for the management of diabetic foot infections developed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) are commonly used worldwide. The issue of whether or not these guidelines need to be adjusted for local circumstances, however, has seldom been assessed in large prospective trials. METHODS: The Turk-DAY trial was a prospective, multi-center study in which infectious disease specialists from centers across Turkey were invited to participate (NCT02026830)...
July 2016: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications
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