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jc virus treatment

Cai Yuan, Candace Deberardinis, Rushang Patel, Seema M Shroff, Steven A Messina, Steven Goldstein, Shahram Mori
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare, yet typically fatal complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. It is caused by reactivation of the John Cunningham (JC) virus in an immunocompromised host. This report describes an unfortunate case of PML in a recipient of an allogeneic stem cell transplant for acute myelogenous leukemia. The JC virus was undetectable in the patient's cerebrospinal fluid by PCR; however, a positive diagnosis was made after a brain biopsy. This and other published cases demonstrate that recipients of allogeneic stem cells can develop PML...
March 7, 2018: Transplant Infectious Disease: An Official Journal of the Transplantation Society
Dejan Pavlovic, Mayur A Patel, Andriani C Patera, Ilse Peterson
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a disease of the central nervous system caused by neuropathogenic prototypes of ubiquitous community-acquired JC virus (JCV). The disease became of particular concern following its association with certain therapies that modulate immune system function without heavy immunosuppression. Due to lack of prophylactic/treatment options and poor outcomes, which often include severe disability or death, PML is a considerable concern for development of new drugs that interfere with immune system functions...
February 2, 2018: Immunobiology
Michael Auer, Gabriel Bsteh, Harald Hegen, Franziska Di Pauli, Sebastian Wurth, Thomas Berger, Florian Deisenhammer
John Cunningham virus (JCV) causes rare, but potentially life-threatening progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Beside JCV index, there is currently no other factor for further risk stratification. Because smoking was reported as potential risk factor for several viral and bacterial infections, we aimed to investigate whether smoking could increase the risk for JCV infection in MS patients. We screened our database of the MS Clinic of the Department of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria, for patients with known smoking status and test result for anti-JCV antibody index as determined by two-step ELISA at Unilabs, Copenhagen, Denmark...
February 8, 2018: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
Raed Alroughani, Saeed Akhtar, Samar Ahmed, Jasem Al-Hashel
BACKGROUND: Anti-JC virus (JCV) antibody testing has been used increasingly to stratify multiple sclerosis (MS) patients into different disease modifying therapies. OBJECTIVES: We assessed JCV serostatus stability longitudinally in MS patients who were regularly tested for anti-JCV antibody and examined the demographic and clinical factors associated with JCV serostatus. METHODS: The data of MS patients who were screened for anti-JCV antibody using the two-step second-generation ELISA were collected between 1st October 2014 and 31st October 2015 at the MS clinic, Kuwait...
January 25, 2018: Multiple Sclerosis and related Disorders
Chun-Nun Chao, Yu-Hsuan Yang, Mu-Sheng Wu, Ming-Chieh Chou, Chiung-Yao Fang, Mien-Chun Lin, Chien-Kuo Tai, Cheng-Huang Shen, Pei-Lain Chen, Deching Chang, Meilin Wang
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor, has a short period of survival even with recent multimodality treatment. The neurotropic JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infects glial cells and oligodendrocytes and causes fatal progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in patients with AIDS. In this study, a possible gene therapy strategy for GBM using JCPyV virus-like particles (VLPs) as a gene delivery vector was investigated. We found that JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver the GFP reporter gene into tumor cells (U87-MG) for expression...
February 2, 2018: Scientific Reports
Sonia Castedo Paz, Luciana Prats Branco, Marina Alves Camargo Pereira, Caroline Vieira Spessotto, Yara Dadalti Fragoso
Purpose: The John Cunningham virus (JCV) is a polyoma virus that infects humans mainly in childhood or adolescence, and presents no symptomatic manifestations. JCV can cause progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in immunosuppressed individuals, including those undergoing treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO). PML is a severe and potentially fatal disease of the brain. The prevalence of JCV antibodies has been described to be between 50% and 90% in human serum...
January 5, 2018: Epidemiology and Health
O Fernández, M Delvecchio, G Edan, S Fredrikson, G Giovannoni, H-P Hartung, E Havrdova, L Kappos, C Pozzilli, P S Soerensen, B Tackenberg, P Vermersch, G Comi
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The European Charcot Foundation supported the development of a set of surveys to understand current practice patterns for the diagnosis and management of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Europe. Part 2 of the report summarizes survey results related to secondary progressive MS (SPMS), primary progressive MS (PPMS), pregnancy, paediatric MS and overall patient management. METHODS: A steering committee of MS neurologists developed case- and practice-based questions for two sequential surveys distributed to MS neurologists throughout Europe...
January 21, 2018: European Journal of Neurology: the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
Francesca Ferretti, Arabella Bestetti, Constantin T Yiannoutsos, Beverly S Musick, Simonetta Gerevini, Laura Passeri, Simona Bossolasco, Antonio Boschini, Diego Franciotta, Adriano Lazzarin, Paola Cinque
Background: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe demyelinating disease caused by the polyomavirus JC (JCV) affecting subjects with impaired immune system. While JCV-DNA detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is diagnostic of PML, the clinical significance of plasma JCV-DNA is still uncertain. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed plasma samples drawn from patients with PML close to disease onset, and controls without PML. In PML patients, we compared plasma JCV DNA detection and levels to: JCV DNA in the other biological samples, clinical and laboratory parameters and patients' survival...
January 15, 2018: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Jeanne K DuShane, Michael P Wilczek, Colleen L Mayberry, Melissa S Maginnis
The human JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infects the majority of the population worldwide and presents as an asymptomatic, persistent infection in the kidney. In individuals who are immunocompromised, JCPyV can become reactivated and cause a lytic infection in the central nervous system resulting in the fatal, demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Infection is initiated by interactions between the capsid protein viral protein 1 (VP1) and the α2,6-linked sialic acid on LSTc, while JCPyV internalization is facilitated by 5-hydroxytryptamine 2 receptors (5-HT2Rs)...
January 10, 2018: Journal of Virology
Michael Craigie, Stephanie Cicalese, Ilker Kudret Sariyer
JC virus (JCV) is a human polyomavirus and the etiologic agent of the demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). PML is observed in patients with underlying immunocompromising conditions, suggesting that neuro-immune interactions between peripheral immune cells and neuro-glia play an important role in controlling viral reactivation in the brain. There is little known about the immunobiology of JCV reactivation in glial cells and the role of immune, glial, and viral players in this regulation...
November 20, 2017: Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology: the Official Journal of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology
Benjamin E Zucker, Sybil R L Stacpoole
A 69-year-old woman presented with a cortical hand syndrome progressing over several weeks. MRI brain showed characteristic appearances of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), confirmed by detection of the JC virus in CSF, despite the absence of any evidence of immunosuppression. Treatment with mirtazapine, mefloquine and cidofovir did not affect the progression of the disease, which was fatal within 7 months of presentation. This report adds to the small case literature that suggests that PML can occur in immunocompetent people, albeit extremely rarely...
November 14, 2017: Journal of Neurovirology
Ivan Jelcic, Benoit Combaluzier, Ilijas Jelcic, Mireia Sospedra, Jan Grimm, Roland Martin
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a serious opportunistic infection of the brain caused by the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV). PML occurs when immune control of persistent infection with JCPyV fails, the virus mutates and changes its cellular tropism, enters the brain and infects astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and, in particular cases, also neurones. Currently, there is no therapy for this often fatal disease. A number of approaches have failed, and only the restoration of protective immunity, if possible, can lead to clearance of the virus once PML has occurred...
November 9, 2017: Swiss Medical Weekly
Sadhana Shrestha, Shankar Shrestha, Junko Shindo, Jeevan B Sherchand, Eiji Haramoto
Irrigation water is a doorway for the pathogen contamination of fresh produce. We quantified pathogenic viruses [human adenoviruses, noroviruses of genogroups I and II, group A rotaviruses, Aichi virus 1 (AiV-1), enteroviruses (EnVs), and salivirus (SaliV)] and examined potential index viruses [JC and BK polyomaviruses (JCPyVs and BKPyVs), pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)] in irrigation water sources in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. River, sewage, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, pond, canal, and groundwater samples were collected in September 2014, and in April and August 2015...
November 2, 2017: Food and Environmental Virology
A Q Reuwer, M Heron, D van der Dussen, T Schneider-Hohendorf, J L Murk
In natalizumab-treated patients without previous immunosuppressive treatment, the JCV antibody index is used to stratify PML risk. A high index value indicates that the risk to develop PML is significantly elevated, although probably about 99% of patients with this index value will not develop PML. This minireview aimed to provide an overview of the basic virology and immunology relevant to understanding JCV infections in MS patients, with a focus on what is presently known about antibodies to JCV and how they could be of use to predict and diagnose PML...
November 2017: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
John Peters, Eric Williamson
To examine changes in anti-JC Virus (JCV) index measurements over time in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients to better understand this test, which is used in assessing risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) with natalizumab. We aim to describe and compare seroconversion rates, variability of JCV antibody index values, and changes in index values over time between patients on natalizumab therapy and patients naïve to natalizumab. Anti-JCV index values are used to help decide whether to start, continue, or stop treatment...
December 2017: Journal of Neurology
Colleen L Mayberry, Christian D S Nelson, Melissa S Maginnis
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) is a significant human pathogen that causes an asymptomatic infection in the kidney in the majority of the population. In immunosuppressed individuals, the virus can become reactivated and spread to the brain, causing the fatal, demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). There are currently limited treatment options for this fatal disease. Attachment to receptors and entry into host cells are the initiating events in JCPyV infection and therefore an attractive target for therapeutics to prevent or treat PML...
September 2017: Current Clinical Microbiology Reports
Jana Machová, Tomáš Reischig
Viral infections are among the most common infectious complications affecting transplant recipients. Due to immunosuppressive therapy predominantly affecting cellular immunity and thus successfully reducing the incidence of acute rejection, there is a higher incidence of viral infections. Herpesviruses and polyomaviruses are ubiquitous pathogens which have the ability to persist in a state of latent infection. In addition to post-transplant reactivation, donor-induced primoinfection can also occur, leading to increased morbidity and contributing to decreased survival of patients...
2017: Vnitr̆ní Lékar̆ství
Eric M L Williamson, Joseph R Berger
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare, but serious, complication encountered in patients treated with a select number of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) utilized in treating multiple sclerosis (MS). PML results from a viral infection in the brain for which the only demonstrated effective therapy is restoring the perturbed immune system-typically achieved in the patient with MS by removing the offending therapeutic agent or, in the case of HIV-associated PML, treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapies...
October 2017: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
Archana Rastogi, Natasha Gulati, Chhagan Bihari, Ashok Chaudhary, Kalpana Bansal, Shridhar Sasturkar, Shalini Thapar, Viniyendra Pamecha
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy caused by polyoma JC virus is a rare and severe demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It occurs in immunocompromised patients and is scarcely reported in liver transplant recipients. Brain biopsy demonstrating demyelination with presence of foamy macrophages, relative preservation of axons, astrogliosis, and typical polyomavirus inclusions in the enlarged oligodendroglial nuclei is essential for diagnosis. Here, we report a case of JC virus-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a living-donor liver transplant recipient who was transplanted for hepatitis C virus-related decompensated cirrhosis...
August 12, 2017: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation
Begoña Ballesta, Héctor González, Vicente Martín, Juan J Ballesta
We report a possible association between ruxolitinib and JC virus meningitis. A 72-year-old man with myelofibrosis started treatment with ruxolitinib. Fourteen days later, the patient presented to the emergency department with fever and nausea. HIV test was negative. Ruxolitinib was suspended. Symptoms progressed with neck stiffness, cognitive impairment, and motor aphasia. CSF was positive for JC virus. MRI showed nonspecific abnormal findings. Five days after the clinical debut, the patient died. The clinical picture, MRI imaging, and positive JC virus PCR in CSF strongly suggest ruxolitinib-related JC virus meningitis...
October 2017: Journal of Neurovirology
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