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Learning network AND medical education

Stylianos Hatzipanagos, Bernadette John, Yuan-Li Tiffany Chiu
BACKGROUND: Social media can support and sustain communities much better than previous generations of learning technologies, where institutional barriers undermined any initiatives for embedding formal and informal learning. Some of the many types of social media have already had an impact on student learning, based on empirical evidence. One of these, social networking, has the potential to support communication in formal and informal spaces. OBJECTIVE: In this paper we report on the evaluation of an institutional social network-King's Social Harmonisation Project (KINSHIP)-established to foster an improved sense of community, enhance communication, and serve as a space to model digital professionalism for students at King's College London, United Kingdom...
March 3, 2016: JMIR Med Educ
José Luis Fernández-Alemán, Laura López-González, Ofelia González-Sequeros, Chrisina Jayne, Juan José López-Jiménez, Ambrosio Toval
OBJECTIVE: This paper presents an empirical study of a formative mobile-based assessment approach that can be used to provide students with intelligent diagnostic feedback to test its educational effectiveness. METHOD: An audience response system called SIDRA was integrated with a neural network-based data analysis to generate diagnostic feedback for guided learning. A total of 200 medical students enrolled in a General and Descriptive Anatomy of the Locomotor System course were taught using two different methods...
October 2016: International Journal of Medical Informatics
E Paternotte, F Scheele, T R van Rossum, M C Seeleman, A J J A Scherpbier, A M van Dulmen
BACKGROUND: Intercultural communication behaviour of doctors with patients requires specific intercultural communication skills, which do not seem structurally implemented in medical education. It is unclear what motivates doctors to apply intercultural communication skills. We investigated how purposefully medical specialists think they practise intercultural communication and how they reflect on their own communication behaviour. METHODS: Using reflective practice, 17 medical specialists independently watched two fragments of videotapes of their own outpatient consultations: one with a native patient and one with a non-native patient...
2016: BMC Medical Education
Mario Maia Bracco, Ana Carolina Cintra Nunes Mafra, Alexandre Hannud Abdo, Fernando Antonio Basile Colugnati, Marcello Dala Bernardina Dalla, Marcelo Marcos Piva Demarzo, Ises Abrahamsohn, Aline Pacífico Rodrigues, Ana Violeta Ferreira de Almeida Delgado, Glauber Alves Dos Prazeres, José Carlos Teixeira, Silvio Possa
BACKGROUND: Better communication among field health care teams and points of care, together with investments focused on improving teamwork, individual management, and clinical skills, are strategies for achieving better outcomes in patient-oriented care. This research aims to implement and evaluate interventions focused on improving communication and knowledge among health teams based on points of care in a regional public health outreach network, assessing the following hypotheses: 1) A better-working communication process between hospitals and primary health care providers can improve the sharing of information on patients as well as patients' outcomes...
2016: BMC Health Services Research
Garvin Brod, Ulman Lindenberger, Anthony D Wagner, Yee Lee Shing
UNLABELLED: According to the schema-relatedness hypothesis, new experiences that make contact with existing schematic knowledge are more easily encoded and remembered than new experiences that do not. Here we investigate how real-life gains in schematic knowledge affect the neural correlates of episodic encoding, assessing medical students 3 months before and immediately after their final exams. Human participants were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging while encoding associative information that varied in relatedness to medical knowledge (face-diagnosis vs face-name pairs)...
August 3, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Su-Ting T Li, Daniel J Tancredi, Alan Schwartz, Ann P Guillot, Ann E Burke, R Franklin Trimm, Susan Guralnick, John D Mahan, Kimberly A Gifford
PURPOSE: To describe clinical skills progression during pediatric residency using the distribution of pediatric milestone assessments by subcompetency and year of training and to determine reasonable milestone expectations at time of graduation. METHOD: Multi-institutional cohort study of the milestones reported to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for all 21 pediatric subcompetencies. Most subcompetencies were measured using five milestone levels (1 = novice, 2 = advanced beginner, 3 = competent, 4 = proficient, 5 = master); 3 subcompetencies had only four levels defined...
July 26, 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Andrea Bickerdike, Conall O'Deasmhunaigh, Siun O'Flynn, Colm O'Tuathaigh
OBJECTIVES: To determine learning strategies, study habits, and online social networking use of undergraduates at an Irish medical school, and their relationship with academic performance. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Year 2 and final year undergraduate-entry and graduate-entry students at an Irish medical school. Data about participants' demographics and educational background, study habits (including time management), and use of online media was collected using a self-report questionnaire...
2016: International Journal of Medical Education
Caragh Brosnan, Erica Southgate, Sue Outram, Heidi Lempp, Sarah Wright, Troy Saxby, Gillian Harris, Anna Bennett, Brian Kelly
CONTEXT: Students from backgrounds of low socio-economic status (SES) or who are first in family to attend university (FiF) are under-represented in medicine. Research has focused on these students' pre-admission perceptions of medicine, rather than on their lived experience as medical students. Such research is necessary to monitor and understand the potential perpetuation of disadvantage within medical schools. OBJECTIVES: This study drew on the theory of Bourdieu to explore FiF students' experiences at one Australian medical school, aiming to identify any barriers faced and inform strategies for equity...
August 2016: Medical Education
Anne Matlow, Ming-Ka Chan, Jordan David Bohnen, Daniel Mark Blumenthal, Melchor Sánchez-Mendiola, Diane de Camps Meschino, Lindy Michelle Samson, Jamiu Busari
Purpose Physicians are often ill-equipped for the leadership activities their work demands. In part, this is due to a gap in traditional medical education. An emergent international network is developing a globally relevant leadership curriculum for postgraduate medical education. The purpose of this article is to share key learnings from this process to date. Design/methodology/approach The Toronto International Summit on Leadership Education for Physicians (TISLEP) was hosted by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and the University of Toronto's Faculty of Medicine and Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation...
July 4, 2016: Leadership in Health Services
Yin Mo, Sophia Archuleta, Sharon Salmon, Dale Fisher
Medical trainees face multiple barriers to participation in major outbreak responses such as that required for Ebola Virus Disease through 2014-2015 in West Africa. Hurdles include fear of contracting and importing the disease, residency requirements, scheduling conflicts, family obligations and lack of experience and maturity. We describe the successful four-week deployment to Liberia of a first year infectious diseases trainee through the mechanism of the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network of the World Health Organization...
2016: PLoS Currents
Donna Mazloomdoost, Gregory Kanter, Robert C Chan, Nicolette Deveaneau, Allison M Wyman, Emily C Von Bargen, Zaid Chaudhry, Solafa Elshatanoufy, Jeannine M Miranne, Christine M Chu, Rachel N Pauls, Lily A Arya, Danielle D Antosh
BACKGROUND: Internet resources are becoming increasingly important for patients seeking medical knowledge. It is imperative to understand patient use and preferences for using the Internet and social networking websites to optimize patient education. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate social networking and Internet use among women with pelvic floor complaints to seek information for their conditions, as well as describe the likelihood, preferences, and predictors of website usage...
June 16, 2016: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Kate Renton, Hilary Quinton, Anton-Paul Thomas Mayer
BACKGROUND: The use of simulation-based medical/nursing teaching is increasingly widespread. Simulation-based teaching offers an immersive learning experience where professionals can practice communication and practical skills in a safe, authentic environment. We designed a paediatric palliative simulation study day primarily aimed at nursing staff who manage these patients in the community/hospice. We believe this is the first of its kind in the UK. AIMS: To establish whether attendance at a paediatric palliative simulation study day improved confidence and knowledge in management of common and/or difficult situations in palliative care...
June 17, 2016: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
Maggie Bartlett, Katie Pritchard, Leo Lewis, Richard B Hays, Robert K Mckinley
INTRODUCTION: One approach to facilitating student interactions with patient pathways at Keele University School of Medicine, England, is the placement of medical students for 25% of their clinical placement time in general practices. The largest component is a 15-week 'student attachment' in primary care during the final year, which required the development of a new network of teaching practices in a rural district of England about 90 km (60 mi) from the main campus in North Staffordshire...
April 2016: Rural and Remote Health
Cassandra D L Fritz, Valerie G Press, Darrell Nabers, Dana Levinson, Holly Humphrey, Monica B Vela
OBJECTIVE: Medical schools may find implementing pipeline programs for minority pre-medical students prohibitive due to a number of factors including the lack of well-described programs in the literature, the limited evidence for program development, and institutional financial barriers. Our goals were to (1) design a pipeline program based on educational theory; (2) deliver the program in a low cost, sustainable manner; and (3) evaluate intermediate outcomes of the program. METHODS: SEALS is a 6-week program based on an asset bundles model designed to promote: (1) socialization and professionalism, (2) education in science learning tools, (3) acquisition of finance literacy, (4) the leveraging of mentorship and networks, and (5) social expectations and resilience, among minority pre-medical students...
June 2016: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Joanne Noone, Peggy Wros, David Cortez, Rana Najjar, Leela Magdaleno
BACKGROUND: A lack of diversity in the nursing workforce nationally has been identified by Oregon state leaders as a factor contributing to health inequity. METHOD: The goal of Advancing Health Equity Through Student Empowerment and Professional Success (HealthE STEPS) is to graduate nursing students from disadvantaged backgrounds to improve health equity within their communities. A comprehensive plan of evidence-based strategies was developed based on social determinants of health and addresses academic socialization, learning support, financial resources, networking, curriculum development, and campus culture...
June 1, 2016: Journal of Nursing Education
Ali Al-Hazmi
OBJECTIVE: To identify what educational resources are used by medical students for their personal study during Primary health care (PHC) clinical rotation and the reasons for making these choices at King Saud University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A survey of 176 male and female medical students was conducted during PHC rotation. A self-administered questionnaire ascertained the type of educational source with reason and preferred type of teaching method. Responses by male and female students were compared by using Pearson's Chi-square tests...
March 2016: Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences Quarterly
Robert B Trelease
Until the late-twentieth century, primary anatomical sciences education was relatively unenhanced by advanced technology and dependent on the mainstays of printed textbooks, chalkboard- and photographic projection-based classroom lectures, and cadaver dissection laboratories. But over the past three decades, diffusion of innovations in computer technology transformed the practices of anatomical education and research, along with other aspects of work and daily life. Increasing adoption of first-generation personal computers (PCs) in the 1980s paved the way for the first practical educational applications, and visionary anatomists foresaw the usefulness of computers for teaching...
May 10, 2016: Anatomical Sciences Education
John Gerard Scott Goldie
BACKGROUND: The emergence of the internet, particularly Web 2.0 has provided access to the views and opinions of a wide range of individuals opening up opportunities for new forms of communication and knowledge formation. Previous ways of navigating and filtering available information are likely to prove ineffective in these new contexts. Connectivism is one of the most prominent of the network learning theories which have been developed for e-learning environments. It is beginning to be recognized by medical educators...
October 2016: Medical Teacher
Catherine M Hennessy, Emma Kirkpatrick, Claire F Smith, Scott Border
Neuroanatomy is a difficult subject in medical education, with students often feeling worried and anxious before they have even started, potentially decreasing their engagement with the subject. At the University of Southampton, we incorporated the use of Twitter as a way of supporting students' learning on a neuroanatomy module to evaluate how it impacted upon their engagement and learning experience. The #nlm2soton hashtag was created and displayed (via a widget) on the university's virtual learning environment (VLE) for a cohort of 197 Year 2 medical students studying neuroanatomy...
April 5, 2016: Anatomical Sciences Education
Philip G Boysen, Laurie Daste, Theresa Northern
BACKGROUND: Demographics are changing on a global scale. In the United States, an aging population continues to work, either by preference or because of insufficient resources to retire. Of even greater importance, a younger generation, referred to as the Millennial Generation, will soon predominate in the workforce and even now accounts for nearly 100% of resident physicians. By the year 2020, there will be 5 generations in the workplace. METHODS: This paper defines and details the characteristics of the 5 generations and examines how the vision, attitudes, values, and expectations of the most recent generations will reshape the workforce and graduate medical education...
2016: Ochsner Journal
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