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Samuel J Watson, Robert G Sowden, Paul Jarvis
The chloroplast houses photosynthesis in all green plants, and is therefore of fundamental importance to the viability and productivity of plants, ecosystems, and agriculture. Chloroplasts are, however, extremely vulnerable to environmental stress, on account of the inherent volatility of oxygenic photosynthesis. To counteract this sensitivity, sophisticated systems of chloroplast stress acclimation have evolved, and many of these involve broad proteome changes. Here, we provide an overview of the interlocking and mutually dependent mechanisms of abiotic stress-induced chloroplast proteome remodelling...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Experimental Botany
Lesley W Chan, Daniel E Morse, Michael J Gordon
Near- and sub-wavelength photonic structures are used by numerous organisms (e.g., insects, cephalopods, fish, birds) to create vivid and often dynamically-tunable colors, as well as create, manipulate, or capture light for vision, communication, crypsis, photosynthesis, and defense. This review introduces the physics of moth eye (ME)-like, biomimetic nanostructures and discusses their application to reduce optical losses and improve efficiency of various optoelectronic devices, including photodetectors, photovoltaics, imagers, and light emitting diodes...
March 16, 2018: Bioinspiration & Biomimetics
Fabien Bernard, Sylvain Dumez, Sébastien Lemière, Anne Platel, Fabrice Nesslany, Annabelle Deram, Franck Vandenbulcke, Damien Cuny
Cadmium (Cd) is a highly toxic element for living organisms and is widespread in metal-contaminated soils. As organisms which can grow up on these polluted areas, plants have some protection mechanisms against Cd issues. Among the plant kingdom, the Brassicaceae family includes species which are known to be able to tolerate and accumulate Cd in their tissues. In this study, Brassica oleracea var. viridis cv "Prover" was exposed to a range of artificially Cd-contaminated soils (from 2.5 up to 20 mg kg-1 ) during 3, 10, and 56 days and the effects on life traits, photosynthesis activity, antioxidant enzymatic activities were studied...
March 15, 2018: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Raúl Cassia, Macarena Nocioni, Natalia Correa-Aragunde, Lorenzo Lamattina
Here, we review information on how plants face redox imbalance caused by climate change, and focus on the role of nitric oxide (NO) in this response. Life on Earth is possible thanks to greenhouse effect. Without it, temperature on Earth's surface would be around -19°C, instead of the current average of 14°C. Greenhouse effect is produced by greenhouse gasses (GHG) like water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2 ), methane (CH4 ), nitrous oxides (Nx O) and ozone (O3 ). GHG have natural and anthropogenic origin. However, increasing GHG provokes extreme climate changes such as floods, droughts and heat, which induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in plants...
2018: Frontiers in Plant Science
Xiulin Wang, Xiaxiang Zhang, Jing Chen, Xiao Wang, Jian Cai, Qin Zhou, Tingbo Dai, Weixing Cao, Dong Jiang
Drought is the major abiotic stress that decreases plant water status, inhibits photosynthesis, induces oxidative stress, restricts growth and finally lead to the reduction of wheat yield. It has been proven that drought priming during vegetative growth stage could enhance tolerance to drought stress at grain filling in wheat. However, whether drought priming imposed at grain filling in parental plants could induce drought tolerance in the offspring is not known. In this study, drought priming was successively applied in the first, the second and the third generation of wheat to obtain the plants of T1 (primed for one generation), T2 (primed for two generations), T3 (primed for three generations)...
2018: Frontiers in Plant Science
Peter L Cummins, Babu Kannappan, Jill E Gready
The ubiquitous enzyme Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (RuBisCO) fixes atmospheric carbon dioxide within the Calvin-Benson cycle that is utilized by most photosynthetic organisms. Despite this central role, RuBisCO's efficiency surprisingly struggles, with both a very slow turnover rate to products and also impaired substrate specificity, features that have long been an enigma as it would be assumed that its efficiency was under strong evolutionary pressure. RuBisCO's substrate specificity is compromised as it catalyzes a side-fixation reaction with atmospheric oxygen; empirical kinetic results show a trend to tradeoff between relative specificity and low catalytic turnover rate...
2018: Frontiers in Plant Science
Weiyang Chen, Longfa Fang, Xiahe Huang, Haitao Ge, Jinlong Wang, Xiaorong Wang, Yuanya Zhang, Na Sui, Wu Xu, Yingchun Wang
Differential expression of cold-responsive proteins is necessary for cyanobacteria to acclimate to cold stress frequently occurring in their natural habitats. Accumulating evidence indicates that cold-induced expression of certain proteins is dependent on light illumination, but a systematic identification of light-dependent and/or light-independent cold-responsive proteins in cyanobacteria is still lacking. Herein, we comprehensively identified cold-responsive proteins in a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Proteomics
Ciarán L Kelly, George M Taylor, Andrew Hitchcock, Antonio Torres-Méndez, John T Heap
Cyanobacteria are important for fundamental studies of photosynthesis and have great biotechnological potential. In order to better study and fully exploit these organisms, the limited repertoire of genetic tools and parts must be expanded. A small number of inducible promoters have been used in cyanobacteria, allowing dynamic external control of gene expression through the addition of specific inducer molecules. However, the inducible promoters used to date suffer from various drawbacks including toxicity of inducers, leaky expression in the absence of inducer and inducer photolability, the latter being particularly relevant to cyanobacteria which, as photoautotrophs, are grown under light...
March 15, 2018: ACS Synthetic Biology
Kentaro Teramura, Tsunehiro Tanaka
Artificial photosynthesis has recently drawn an increasing amount of attention due to the fact that it allows for direct solar-to-chemical energy conversion. However, one of the basic steps of this process, namely the reduction of CO2 by H2 O to afford O2 and CO2 reduction products (CO2 RPs) such as HCOOH, CO, HCHO, CH3 OH, and CH4 , is very difficult to achieve. In contrast to the CO2 reduction in plants and homogenous systems, the reduction of CO2 to CO2 RPs over heterogeneous photocatalysts was challenged by the competing reduction of H+ to H2 ...
March 15, 2018: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics: PCCP
P Pramanik, Bidisha Chakrabarti, Arti Bhatia, S D Singh, A Maity, P Aggarwal, P Krishnan
An attempt has been made to study the effect of elevated temperature on soil hydrothermal regimes and winter wheat growth under simulated warming in temperature gradient tunnel (TGT). Results showed that bulk density (BDs) of 0, 0.9, and 2.5 °C were significantly different whereas BDs of 2.8 and 3.5 °C were not significantly different. Water filled pore space (WFPS) was maximum at 3.5 °C temperature rise and varied between 43.80 and 98.55%. Soil surface temperature (ST) at different dates of sowing increased with rise in sensor temperature and highest ST was observed at S5 sensors (3...
March 14, 2018: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Takeshi Takamatsu, Marouane Baslam, Takuya Inomata, Kazusato Oikawa, Kimiko Itoh, Takayuki Ohnishi, Tetsu Kinoshita, Toshiaki Mitsui
Chloroplasts, which perform photosynthesis, are one of the most important organelles in green plants and algae. Chloroplasts maintain an independent genome that includes important genes encoding their photosynthetic machinery and various housekeeping functions. Owing to its non-recombinant nature, low mutation rates, and uniparental inheritance, the chloroplast genome (plastome) can give insights into plant evolution and ecology and in the development of biotechnological and breeding applications. However, efficient methods to obtain high-quality chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) are currently not available, impeding powerful sequencing and further functional genomics research...
2018: Frontiers in Plant Science
Xue-Yan Liu, Keisuke Koba, Lina A Koyama, Sarah E Hobbie, Marissa S Weiss, Yoshiyuki Inagaki, Gaius R Shaver, Anne E Giblin, Satoru Hobara, Knute J Nadelhoffer, Martin Sommerkorn, Edward B Rastetter, George W Kling, James A Laundre, Yuriko Yano, Akiko Makabe, Midori Yano, Cong-Qiang Liu
Plant nitrogen (N) use is a key component of the N cycle in terrestrial ecosystems. The supply of N to plants affects community species composition and ecosystem processes such as photosynthesis and carbon (C) accumulation. However, the availabilities and relative importance of different N forms to plants are not well understood. While nitrate (NO3 - ) is a major N form used by plants worldwide, it is discounted as a N source for Arctic tundra plants because of extremely low NO3 - concentrations in Arctic tundra soils, undetectable soil nitrification, and plant-tissue NO3 - that is typically below detection limits...
March 14, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Christabel Y L Chan, Kum C Hiong, Mel V Boo, Celine Y L Choo, Wai P Wong, Shit F Chew, Yuen K Ip
Giant clams live in nutrient-poor reef waters of the Indo-Pacific and rely on symbiotic dinoflagellates ( Symbiodinium spp., also known as zooxanthellae) for nutrients. As the symbionts are nitrogen deficient, the host clam has to absorb exogenous nitrogen and supply it to them. This study aimed to demonstrate light-enhanced urea absorption in the fluted giant clam, Tridacna squamosa , and to clone and characterize the urea active transporter, DUR3-like, from its ctenidium (gill). Results indicate that T. squamosa could absorb exogenous urea, and the rate of urea uptake in light was significantly higher than that in darkness...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
Samuel H Taylor, Michael J Aspinwall, Chris J Blackman, Brendan Choat, David T Tissue, Oula Ghannoum
Atmospheric CO2 (ca) has increased since the last glacial period, increasing photosynthetic water use efficiency and improving plant productivity. Evolution of C4 photosynthesis at low ca led to decreased stomatal conductance (gs), which provided an advantage over C3 plants that may be reduced by rising ca. Using controlled environments, we determined how increasing ca affects C4 water use relative to C3 plants. Leaf gas exchange and mass per area (LMA) were measured for four C3 and four C4 annual, crop-related grasses at glacial (200), ambient (400), and super-ambient (640 µmol mol-1) ca...
March 10, 2018: Journal of Experimental Botany
S Suresh, Gautam E Unni, M Satyanarayana, A Sreekumaran Nair, V P Mahadevan Pillai
Engineering photons on a nanoscale via guidance and localization by metal nanostructures has a profound influence on the performance of devices that try to mimic the process of photosynthesis. The conventional route for the synthesis of plasmonic nanoparticles and their integration into the porous structure of the photoanode either directly or after being capped with a dielectric material not only adds to the complexity but also to the cost of the cell. The present study introduces the concept of a plasmonic blocking layer that concurrently acts as a light harvester and an electron-blocking layer in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), wherein the plasmonic silver nanoparticles are incorporated into an Nb2 O5 blocking layer by a simple one-step process...
March 14, 2018: Dalton Transactions: An International Journal of Inorganic Chemistry
Ratnesh Singh, Tyler Jones, Ching Man Wai, John Jifon, Chifumi Nagai, Ray Ming, Qingyi Yu
Sugarcane is among the most efficient crops in converting solar energy into chemical energy. However, due to its complex genome structure and inheritance, the genetic and molecular basis of biomass yield in sugarcane is still largely unknown. We created an F2 segregating population by crossing S. officinarum and S. spontaneum and evaluated the biomass yield of the F2 individuals. The F2 individuals exhibited clear transgressive segregation in biomass yield. We sequenced transcriptomes of source and sink tissues from 12 selected extreme segregants to explore the molecular basis of high biomass yield for future breeding of high-yielding energy canes...
March 13, 2018: Scientific Reports
Tao Wei, Kejun Deng, Hongbin Wang, Lipeng Zhang, Chunguo Wang, Wenqin Song, Yong Zhang, Chengbin Chen
In our previous study, drought-resistant transgenic plants of Salvia miltiorrhiza were produced via overexpression of the transcription factor AtDREB1A. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underpinning elevated drought tolerance in transgenic plants, in the present study we compared the global transcriptional profiles of wild-type (WT) and AtDREB1A -expressing transgenic plants using RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). Using cluster analysis, we identified 3904 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Compared with WT plants, 423 unigenes were up-regulated in pRD29A::AtDREB1A-31 before drought treatment, while 936 were down-regulated and 1580 and 1313 unigenes were up- and down-regulated after six days of drought...
March 12, 2018: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Katharine L Cary, Jarmila Pittermann
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The pygmy forest, a plant community of severely stunted conifers and ericaceous angiosperms, occurs on patches of highly acidic, nutrient-poor soils along the coast of Northern California, USA. This system is an excellent opportunity to study the effect of severe nutrient deficiency on leaf physiology in a naturally-occurring ecosystem. In this study, we seek to understand the physiological mechanisms stunting the plants' growth and their implications for whole plant function...
January 2018: American Journal of Botany
Anushree Sanyal, Jonathan Lenoir, Carmel O'Neill, Frederic Dubois, Guillaume Decocq
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Nearly all seed plants rely on stored seed reserves before photosynthesis can commence. Natural selection for seed oil traits must have occurred over 319 million years of evolution since the first seed plant ancestor. Accounting for the biogeographic distribution of seed oil traits is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms of adaptive evolution in seed plants. However, the evolution of seed oils is poorly understood. We provide evidence of the adaptive nature of seed oil traits at the intraspecific and interspecific levels in Brassicaceae-an oilseed-rich and economically important plant family...
January 2018: American Journal of Botany
Zhenyi Li, Hongyu Xu, Yue Li, Xiufu Wan, Zhao Ma, Jing Cao, Zhensong Li, Feng He, Yufei Wang, Liqiang Wan, Zongyong Tong, Xianglin Li
The induction of miR399 and miR398 and the inhibition of miR156, miR159, miR160, miR171, miR2111, and miR2643 were observed under Pi deficiency in alfalfa. The miRNA-mediated genes involved in basic metabolic process, root and shoot development, stress response and Pi uptake. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) deficiency is known to be a limiting factor in plant development and growth. However, the underlying miRNAs associated with the Pi deficiency-responsive mechanism in alfalfa are unclear. To elucidate the molecular mechanism at the miRNA level, we constructed four small RNA (sRNA) libraries from the roots and shoots of alfalfa grown under normal or Pi-deficient conditions...
March 12, 2018: Plant Molecular Biology
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