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chromosomal abnormalities in human development

Alexandre Webster, Melina Schuh
Eggs and sperm develop through a specialized cell division called meiosis. During meiosis, the number of chromosomes is reduced by two sequential divisions in preparation for fertilization. In human female meiosis, chromosomes frequently segregate incorrectly, resulting in eggs with an abnormal number of chromosomes. When fertilized, these eggs give rise to aneuploid embryos that usually fail to develop. As women become older, errors in meiosis occur more frequently, resulting in increased risks of infertility, miscarriage, and congenital syndromes, such as Down's syndrome...
September 27, 2016: Trends in Cell Biology
Anne Rochtus, Raf Winand, Griet Laenen, Elise Vangeel, Benedetta Izzi, Christine Wittevrongel, Yves Moreau, Carla Verpoorten, Katrien Jansen, Chris Van Geet, Kathleen Freson
BACKGROUND: Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations that arise from failure of neurulation during early embryonic development. The molecular basis underlying most human NTDs still remains largely unknown. Based on the hypothesis that folic acid prevents NTDs by stimulating methylation reactions, DNA methylation changes could play a role in NTDs. We performed a methylome analysis for patients with myelomeningocele (MMC). Using a candidate CpG analysis for HOX genes, a significant association between HOXB7 hypomethylation and MMC was found...
2016: Clinical Epigenetics
Konstantinos A Economou, Dimitra Christopikou, Erika Tsorva, Stephen Davies, Minas Mastrominas, Haris Cazlaris, Michael Koutsilieris, Panagoula Angelogianni, Dimitris Loutradis
PURPOSE: Artificial oocyte activation using calcium ionophores and enhancement of embryonic developmental potential by the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) have already been reported. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic effect of these two methods on aged human unfertilized oocytes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Then, we cultured the resulting embryos to the blastocyst stage and screened them for chromosomal abnormalities, to assess the safety of this protocol...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics
Yoo Hong Min, Wootae Kim, Ja-Eun Kim
Mitotic progression is crucial for the maintenance of chromosomal stability. A proper progression is ensured by the activities of multiple kinases. One of these enzymes, the serine/threonine kinase Aurora A, is required for proper mitosis through the regulation of centrosome and spindle assembly. In this study, we functionally characterized a newly developed Aurora kinase A inhibitor, TC-A2317. In human lung cancer cells, TC-A2317 slowed proliferation by causing aberrant formation of centrosome and microtubule spindles and prolonging the duration of mitosis...
October 4, 2016: Oncotarget
Joshua D Aaker, Benayahu Elbaz, Yuwen Wu, Timothy J Looney, Li Zhang, Bruce T Lahn, Brian Popko
The transcriptional program that controls oligodendrocyte maturation and central nervous system (CNS) myelination has not been fully characterized. In this study, we use high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze how the loss of a key transcription factor, zinc finger protein 191 (ZFP191), results in oligodendrocyte development abnormalities and CNS hypomyelination. Using a previously described mutant mouse that is deficient in ZFP191 protein expression (Zfp191(null)), we demonstrate that key transcripts are reduced in the whole brain as well as within oligodendrocyte lineage cells cultured in vitro To determine whether the loss of myelin seen in Zfp191(null) mice contributes indirectly to these perturbations, we also examined the transcriptome of a well-characterized mouse model of hypomyelination, in which the myelin structural protein myelin basic protein (MBP) is deficient...
October 2016: ASN Neuro
Arash Salmaninejad, Mohammad Reza Zamani, Mehrnaz Pourvahedi, Zahra Golchehre, Ali Hosseini Bereshneh, Nima Rezaei
UNLABELLED: Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are named based on their expression pattern that is restricted in a number of normal and abnormal tissues. Tumor cells frequently express antigens whose expression is typically restricted to germ cells. Their unique expression pattern is guaranteed by precise epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. Because of their tumor-limited, high immunogenicity, and biased expression, discovery of these molecules provides unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development in the field of cancer diagnosis and immunotherapy...
October 2016: Immunological Investigations
Hong-Yeoul Ryu, Nicole R Wilson, Sameet Mehta, Soo Seok Hwang, Mark Hochstrasser
Post-translational protein modification by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) regulates numerous cellular pathways, including transcription, cell division, and genome maintenance. The SUMO protease Ulp2 modulates many of these SUMO-dependent processes in budding yeast. From whole-genome RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we unexpectedly discovered that cells lacking Ulp2 display a twofold increase in transcript levels across two particular chromosomes: chromosome I (ChrI) and ChrXII. This is due to the two chromosomes being present at twice their normal copy number...
August 15, 2016: Genes & Development
Haojian Zhang, Shaoguang Li
Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder derived from a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), harboring Philadelphia chromosome (Ph chromosome). Formation of the Ph chromosome is caused by a reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 9 and 22 t(9;22)(q34;q11), resulting in a fusion protein known as BCR-ABL which has constitutive tyrosine kinase activity and promotes the proliferation of leukemia cells via multiple mechanisms. Studies on CML have led to the identification of the first cancer-associated chromosomal abnormality and the subsequent development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that inhibit BCR-ABL kinase activity in CML...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Edgar S Wills, Wybrich R Cnossen, Joris A Veltman, Rob Woestenenk, Marloes Steehouwer, Jody Salomon, René H M Te Morsche, Meritxell Huch, Jayne Y Hehir-Kwa, Martijn J Banning, Rolph Pfundt, Ronald Roepman, Alexander Hoischen, Joost P H Drenth
Autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease (ADPLD) is caused by variants in PRKCSH, SEC63, and LRP5, whereas autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is caused by variants in PKD1 and PKD2. Liver cyst development in these disorders is explained by somatic loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) of the wild-type allele in the developing cyst. We hypothesize that we can use this mechanism to identify novel disease genes that reside in LOH regions. In this study, we aim to map abnormal genomic regions using high-density SNP microarrays to find novel PLD genes...
August 24, 2016: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
Daryl A Scott, Andres Hernandez-Garcia, Mahshid S Azamian, Valerie K Jordan, Bum Jun Kim, Molly Starkovich, Jinglan Zhang, Lee-Jun Wong, Sandra A Darilek, Amy M Breman, Yaping Yang, James R Lupski, Amyn K Jiwani, Bibhuti Das, Seema R Lalani, Alejandro D Iglesias, Jill A Rosenfeld, Fan Xia
BACKGROUND: The non-POU domain containing octamer-binding gene (NONO) is located on chromosome Xq13.1 and encodes a member of a small family of RNA-binding and DNA-binding proteins that perform a variety of tasks involved in RNA synthesis, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. Loss-of-function variants in NONO have been described as a cause of intellectual disability in males but have not been described in association with congenital heart defects or cardiomyopathy. In this article, we seek to further define the phenotypic consequences of NONO depletion in human subjects...
August 22, 2016: Journal of Medical Genetics
Tomer Halevy, Shira Akov, Martina Bohndorf, Barbara Mlody, James Adjaye, Nissim Benvenisty, Michal Goldberg
Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) results from the absence of the NBS1 protein, responsible for detection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NBS is characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition. Here, we show successful reprogramming of NBS fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (NBS-iPSCs). Our data suggest a strong selection for karyotypically normal fibroblasts to go through the reprogramming process. NBS-iPSCs then acquire numerous chromosomal aberrations and show a delayed response to DSB induction...
August 30, 2016: Cell Reports
Yi-Meng Zhou, Xiao-Yong Dai, Ri-Tai Huang, Song Xue, Ying-Jia Xu, Xing-Biao Qiu, Yi-Qing Yang
Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is the most prevalent form of primary cardiomyopathy in humans and is a leading cause of heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Genetic abnormalities have been demonstrated to be a major contributor to the development of DCM. However, DCM is a genetically heterogeneous disease, and the genetic basis underlying DCM in a significant proportion of patients remains unclear. In the current study, the coding exons and splicing junction sites of the T‑Box 20 (TBX20) gene, which encodes a T‑box transcription factor essential for cardiac morphogenesis and structural remodeling, were sequenced in 115 unrelated patients with idiopathic DCM, and a novel heterozygous mutation, p...
October 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Dominique Bluteau, Julien Masliah-Planchon, Connor Clairmont, Alix Rousseau, Raphael Ceccaldi, Catherine Dubois d'Enghien, Olivier Bluteau, Wendy Cuccuini, Stéphanie Gachet, Régis Peffault de Latour, Thierry Leblanc, Gérard Socié, André Baruchel, Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet, Alan D D'Andrea, Jean Soulier
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, chromosome instability, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), and a strong predisposition to cancer. Twenty FA genes have been identified, and the FANC proteins they encode cooperate in a common pathway that regulates DNA crosslink repair and replication fork stability. We identified a child with severe BMF who harbored biallelic inactivating mutations of the translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) gene REV7 (also known as MAD2L2), which encodes the mutant REV7 protein REV7-V85E...
September 1, 2016: Journal of Clinical Investigation
Csaba Galambos, Angela D Minic, Douglas Bush, Dominique Nguyen, Blair Dodson, Gregory Seedorf, Steven H Abman
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infants with Down syndrome (DS) or Trisomy 21, are at high risk for developing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but mechanisms that increase susceptibility are poorly understood. Laboratory studies have shown that early disruption of angiogenesis during development impairs vascular and alveolar growth and causes PAH. Human chromosome 21 encodes known anti-angiogenic factors, including collagen18a1 (endostatin, ES), ß-amyloid peptide (BAP) and Down Syndrome Critical Region 1 (DSCR-1)...
2016: PloS One
S Garcia-Herrero, A Cervero, E Mateu, P Mir, M E Póo, L Rodrigo, M Vera, C Rubio
Preimplantation development comprises the initial stages of mammalian development, before the embryo implants into the mother's uterus. In normal conditions, after fertilization the embryo grows until reaching blastocyst stage. The blastocyst grows as the cells divide and the cavity expands, until it arrives at the uterus, where it "hatches" from the zona pellucida to implant into the uterine wall. Nevertheless, embryo quality and viability can be affected by chromosomal abnormalities, most of which occur during gametogenesis and early embryo development; human embryos produced in vitro are especially vulnerable...
2016: Current Topics in Developmental Biology
M S H Ko
Zygotic genome activation (ZGA, a.k.a. zygotic gene activation) is a critical event in development, when the paternally derived genome and maternally derived genome begin to be activated and transcribed after fertilization. Major ZGA occurs at the two-cell stage in mice and the four- to eight-cell stage in human preimplantation embryos. It has been thought that ZGA exists to provide RNAs and proteins supporting embryonic development after supplies stored in oocytes are used up; however, this paradigm does not seem to explain recent findings...
2016: Current Topics in Developmental Biology
Tanvi Arora, Renu Dhir
The genetic defects in the humans are uncovered by studying the chromosomes, as they are the genetic information carriers. They are non-rigid objects and they appear in different orientations when they are imaged. To find out the genetic defects, the chromosomes are pre-processed so that they are not touching, overlapping, and bent, and the noise is also discarded. The presence of bends, overlaps, or touches makes it difficult to uncover the genetic abnormalities. So there is a need for development of an efficient technique to classify the segmented chromosomes into different types and then pre-process them in order to correct their orientation...
July 29, 2016: Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing
Ozlem Giray Bozkaya, Esra Ataman, Ozge Aksel Kilicarslan, Tufan Cankaya, Ayfer Ulgenalp
Aniridia is a congenital, panocular abnormality which is characterized by partial or complete absence of iris and various degrees of iris hypoplasia. Mutations in the PAX6 gene are found in ~90% of cases with aniridia. The human PAX6 gene is located at chromosome 11p13 and encodes a transcriptional regulator that has crucial roles in the development of the eyes, central nervous system and pancreatic islets. The present study performed a clinical and genomic analysis of two families containing multiple cases of aniridia...
September 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Hai Long, Heng Yin, Ling Wang, M Eric Gershwin, Qianjin Lu
One of the major disappointments in human autoimmunity has been the relative failure on genome-wide association studies to provide "smoking genetic guns" that would explain the critical role of genetic susceptibility to loss of tolerance. It is well known that autoimmunity refers to the abnormal state that the dysregulated immune system attacks the healthy cells and tissues due to the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. Its clinical outcomes are generally characterized by the presence of autoreactive immune cells and (or) the development of autoantibodies, leading to various types of autoimmune disorders...
July 5, 2016: Journal of Autoimmunity
Kee Hang Lee, Hyun Nam, Da Eun Jeong, Sung Soo Kim, Hye Jin Song, Hee Jang Pyeon, Kyeongjin Kang, Seung-Cheol Hong, Do-Hyun Nam, Kyeung Min Joo
Stem cells and therapeutic genes are emerging as a new therapeutic approach to treat various neurodegenerative diseases with few effective treatment options. However, potential formation of tumors by stem cells has hampered their clinical application. Moreover, adequate preclinical platforms to precisely test tumorigenic potential of stem cells are controversial. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of various animal models for in vivo stem cell tumorigenicity testing to identify the most sensitive platform...
2016: PloS One
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