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Alzheimer's dementia

Raquel Marin, Noemí Fabelo, Virginia Martín, Paula Garcia-Esparcia, Isidre Ferrer, David Quinto-Alemany, Mario Díaz
Lipid rafts are highly dynamic membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. Compelling evidence has demonstrated that alterations in lipid rafts are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such Alzheimer's disease, but at present, whether alterations in lipid raft microdomains occur in other types of dementia such dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) remains unknown. Our analyses reveal that lipid rafts from DLB exhibit aberrant lipid profiles including low levels of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (mainly docosahexaenoic acid), plasmalogens and cholesterol, and reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes...
September 6, 2016: Neurobiology of Aging
(no author information available yet)
Dementia prevalence estimates vary among population-based studies, depending on the definitions of dementia, methodologies and data sources and types of costs they use. A common approach is needed to avoid confusion and increase public and stakeholder confidence in the estimates. Since 1994, five major studies have yielded widely differing estimates of dementia prevalence and monetary costs of dementia in Canada. These studies variously estimated the prevalence of dementia for the year 2011 as low as 340 170 and as high as 747 000...
October 2016: Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention in Canada
Dennis Chan, Laura Marie Gallaher, Kuven Moodley, Ludovico Minati, Neil Burgess, Tom Hartley
This protocol describes the administration of the 4 Mountains Test (4MT), a short test of spatial memory, in which memory for the topographical layout of four mountains within a computer-generated landscape is tested using a delayed match-to-sample paradigm. Allocentric spatial memory is assessed by altering the viewpoint, colors and textures between the initially presented and target images. Allocentric spatial memory is a key function of the hippocampus, one of the earliest brain regions to be affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and impairment of hippocampal function predates the onset of dementia...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Jeffrey Cummings, Philip Scheltens, Ian McKeith, Rafael Blesa, John E Harrison, Paulo H F Bertolucci, Kenneth Rockwood, David Wilkinson, Wouter Wijker, David A Bennett, Raj C Shah
BACKGROUND: Souvenaid® (uridine monophosphate, docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, choline, phospholipids, folic acid, vitamins B12, B6, C, and E, and selenium), was developed to support the formation and function of neuronal membranes. OBJECTIVE: To determine effect sizes observed in clinical trials of Souvenaid and to calculate the number needed to treat to show benefit or harm. METHODS: Data from all three reported randomized controlled trials of Souvenaid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia (Souvenir I, Souvenir II, and S-Connect) and an open-label extension study were included in analyses of effect size for cognitive, functional, and behavioral outcomes...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Maria Anderson, Feng Xu, Ming-Hsuan Ou-Yang, Judianne Davis, William E Van Nostrand, John K Robinson
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) depositions in both the brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature are recognized as important pathological components that contribute to the cognitive impairments found in individuals with AD. Because pharmacological options have been minimally effective in treating cognitive impairment to date, interest in the development of preventative lifestyle intervention strategies has increased in the field...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Xianbo Zhuang, Yanxiu Chen, Xianpeng Zhuang, Tao Xing, Tuanzhi Chen, Guisheng Jiang, Xiafeng Yang
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is often associated with declined visual processing abilities. Here we tested whether the functions of center-surround suppression- a hallmark property in the visual system- are altered by AD. To this end, we recruited three groups of participants (AD, elderly, and young) in a motion direction discrimination task, in which we measured the temporal duration threshold of a  drifting Gabor with varying stimulus sizes. We first replicated the phenomena of center-surround suppression that the required duration for discriminating a high contrast grating decreases with increasing stimulus size...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Katherine Amy Lin, Colin Rundel, P Murali Doraiswamy
BACKGROUND: Prior studies have noted gender differences in cognition, imaging, and pathological markers in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects. Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), a major controlling factor in the proportion of bioavailable versus bound testosterone and estrogen, has been proposed to contribute to links between hormones and dementia, but has not yet been investigated fully in a prospective biomarker trial. OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether, among subjects with MCI, SHBG levels predict future rate of cognitive decline...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Song Hee Lee, Bo Young Choi, Jin Hee Kim, A Ra Kho, Min Sohn, Hong Ki Song, Hui Chul Choi, Sang Won Suh
Choline alfoscerate (α-GPC) is a common choline compound and acetylcholine precursor in the brain, which has been shown to be effective in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. α-GPC has been shown to enhance memory and cognitive function in stroke and Alzheimer's patients but currently remains untested in patients suffering from epilepsy. This study aimed to evaluate whether α-GPC treatment after seizure can ameliorate seizure-induced cognitive impairment and neuronal injury. The potential therapeutic effects of α-GPC on seizure-induced cognitive impairment were tested in an animal model of pilocarpine-induced seizure...
October 17, 2016: Brain Research
Xue-Yuan Li, Wei-Wei Men, Hua Zhu, Jian-Feng Lei, Fu-Xing Zuo, Zhan-Jing Wang, Zhao-Hui Zhu, Xin-Jie Bao, Ren-Zhi Wang
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using (18)F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr)...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
K Rygiel
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease, in which an accumulation of toxic amyloid beta in the brain precedes the emergence of clinical symptoms. AD spectrum consists of presymptomatic, early symptomatic, and symptomatic phase of dementia. At present, no pharmacotherapy exists to modify or reverse a course of AD, and only symptomatic treatments are available. Many elderly patients, diagnosed with multiple medical conditions (such as cardiovascular diseases, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cerebrovascular diseases) are at increased risk of the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), AD, and vascular dementia...
October 2016: Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Carlo Wilke, Frank Gillardon, Christian Deuschle, Markus A Hobert, Iris E Jansen, Florian G Metzger, Peter Heutink, Thomas Gasser, Walter Maetzler, Cornelis Blauwendraat, Matthis Synofzik
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Reduced progranulin levels are a hallmark of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) caused by loss-of-function (LoF) mutations in the progranulin gene (GRN). However, alterations of central nervous progranulin expression also occur in neurodegenerative disorders unrelated to GRN mutations, such as Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesised that central nervous progranulin levels are also reduced in GRN-negative FTD. METHODS: Progranulin levels were determined in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum in 75 subjects (37 FTD patients and 38 controls)...
October 20, 2016: Neuro-degenerative Diseases
Marissa B Guzzo, Hoa T Nguyen, Thanh H Pham, Monika Wyszczelska-Rokiel, Hieronim Jakubowski, Kerstin A Wolff, Sam Ogwang, Joseph L Timpona, Soumya Gogula, Michael R Jacobs, Markus Ruetz, Bernhard Kräutler, Donald W Jacobsen, Guo-Fang Zhang, Liem Nguyen
The methylfolate trap, a metabolic blockage associated with anemia, neural tube defects, Alzheimer's dementia, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer, was discovered in the 1960s, linking the metabolism of folate, vitamin B12, methionine and homocysteine. However, the existence or physiological significance of this phenomenon has been unknown in bacteria, which synthesize folate de novo. Here we identify the methylfolate trap as a novel determinant of the bacterial intrinsic death by sulfonamides, antibiotics that block de novo folate synthesis...
October 2016: PLoS Pathogens
Poonam Piplani, Chhanda Charan Danta
BACKGROUND: In 2016, the statistical reports stated that Alzheimer is not just memory loss but it kills and has become the 6th leading cause of death. The number of dementia patients is increasing rapidly and expected to rise to 131.5 million by 2050. Still there is not a drug candidate that can cure the cognitive deficits completely. OBJECTIVE: Series of novel piperazine derivatives have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for cognition enhancing activity...
October 14, 2016: Central Nervous System Agents in Medicinal Chemistry
M Florencia Iulita, Hélène Girouard
Hypertension and dementia are two of the most prevalent and damaging diseases associated with aging. Chronic hypertension, particularly during mid-life, is a strong risk factor for late-life cognitive decline and impairment. Hypertension is also the number one risk factor for stroke and a major contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Despite the vast epidemiologic and mechanistic evidence linking hypertension to cognitive impairment, and the positive effects of blood pressure lowering on reducing the risk of post-stroke dementia, uncertainty remains about the benefit of antihypertensive medication on other forms of dementia...
October 19, 2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Seu Ping Guiraud, Ivan Montoliu, Laeticia Da Silva, Loïc Dayon, Antonio Núñez Galindo, John Corthésy, Martin Kussmann, Francois-Pierre Martin
The methionine cycle is a key pathway contributing to the regulation of human health, with well-established involvement in cardiovascular diseases and cognitive function. Changes in one-carbon cycle metabolites have also been associated with mild cognitive decline, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer's disease. Today, there is no single analytical method to monitor both metabolites and co-factors of the methionine cycle. To address this limitation, we here report for the first time a new method for the simultaneous quantitation of 17 metabolites in the methionine cycle, which are homocysteic acid, taurine, serine, cysteine, glycine, homocysteine, riboflavin, methionine, pyridoxine, cystathionine, pyridoxamine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, S-adenosylmethionine, betaine, choline, dimethylglycine, and 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid...
October 18, 2016: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Laura M Gault, Robert A Lenz, Craig W Ritchie, Andreas Meier, Ahmed A Othman, Qi Tang, Scott Berry, Yili Pritchett, Weining Z Robieson
BACKGROUND: Results from a phase 2a study indicated that treatment with the novel α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist ABT-126 25 mg once daily (QD) was associated with a trend for improvement in cognition in subjects with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's dementia (AD). A phase 2b program was designed to evaluate a broader dose range of ABT-126 as monotherapy in subjects with mild-to-moderate AD. The program consisted of a double-blind, placebo and active controlled study of ABT-126 (dose range 25-75 mg) and an open-label extension study (75 mg)...
October 18, 2016: Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
Eric D Hamlett, Edward J Goetzl, Aurélie Ledreux, Vitaly Vasilevko, Heather A Boger, Angela LaRosa, David Clark, Steven L Carroll, Maria Carmona Iragui, Juan Fortea, Elliott J Mufson, Marwan Sabbagh, Abdul H Mohammed, Dean Hartley, Eric Doran, Ira T Lott, Ann-Charlotte Granholm
INTRODUCTION: Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) exhibit Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology and dementia early in life. Blood biomarkers of AD neuropathology would be valuable, as non-AD intellectual disabilities of DS and AD dementia overlap clinically. We hypothesized that elevations of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and phosphorylated-tau in neuronal exosomes may document preclinical AD. METHODS: AD neuropathogenic proteins Aβ1-42, P-T181-tau, and P-S396-tau were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in extracts of neuronal exosomes purified from blood of individuals with DS and age-matched controls...
October 15, 2016: Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
Jeremy J Pruzin, Julie A Schneider, Ana W Capuano, Sue E Leurgans, Lisa L Barnes, Rexford S Ahima, Steven E Arnold, David A Bennett, Zoe Arvanitakis
We examined the relationship of diabetes and hemoglobin A1C (A1C) to 2 common causes of dementia. The study included 1228 subjects who underwent annual clinical evaluations and a brain autopsy at death, as part of a Rush longitudinal cohort study of aging. A total of 433 subjects had A1C data available. Neuropathologic evaluations documented the size and location of infarcts. Modified silver stain-based Alzheimer disease (AD) measures included global and regional scores. We used regression analyses to examine associations of diabetes and A1C with overall and regional neuropathology...
October 17, 2016: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
Chiara Zucchella, Michelangelo Bartolo, Sara Bernini, Marta Picascia, Paola Malinverni, Elena Sinforiani
INTRODUCTION: The relationship between cognitive and functional impairment in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) at the earliest stages of the disease is not well characterized. This study aimed at investigating such relationships along AD evolution by means of the Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD). METHODS: Consecutive pairs of AD outpatients and their primary informal caregivers were enrolled. Patients were evaluated by means of the Mini Mental State Examination and neuropsychological tests...
October 17, 2016: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
Tengfei Guo, Matthias Brendel, Timo Grimmer, Axel Rominger, Igor Yakushev
: Knowledge about spatial and temporal patterns of beta-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is essential for understanding Alzheimer's disease (AD) and for design of anti-amyloid drug trials. Here, we tested if the regional pattern of longitudinal Aβ accumulation can be predicted by baseline amyloid PET. METHODS: Analyzed were baseline and 2 years follow-up (18)F-florbetapir PET data from 58 patients with incipient and manifest dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). By determining how fast amyloid deposits in a given region relative to the whole brain grey matter, a pseudo-temporal accumulation rate for each region was calculated...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Nuclear Medicine: Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
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