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Wall deformity

Akitoshi Inoue, Shinichi Ohta, Norihisa Nitta, Masahiro Yoshimura, Tomoharu Shimizu, Masaji Tani, Ryoji Kushima, Kiyoshi Murata
PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility of assessing advanced T-stage (T3-T4) colorectal carcinomas by correlating MRI with histopathological findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population comprised 31 patients with 32 lesions (22 colon and 10 rectal carcinomas). The relationship between the tumor and bowel layers on T2- and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images (T2WI, CE-T1WI), bowel wall deformity, and the linear architecture of subserosal fat on T2WI scans was independently assessed by two radiologists...
October 18, 2016: Japanese Journal of Radiology
Shao-Rui Liu, Xue-Fei Song, Zheng-Kang Li, Qin Shen, Xian-Qun Fan
OBJECTIVE: With orbital floor fracture incidence rates increasing year by year, many patients require surgical treatment to improve diplopia, limitation of extraocular muscle movement (EOM), enophthalmos, and midface appearance. With the use of high-density polyethylene, titanium screws, titanium plate, and titanium mesh to repair an orbital floor fracture, enophthalmos and midfacial deformity correction procedures have made great progress. However, attenuating diplopia and the limitation of EOM are still difficult problems to prevent...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Tingyan Xu, Jingping Sun, Alex Pui-Wai Lee, Yan Yang, Xingsheng Yang, Yan Li, Cheuk-Man Yu, Jiguang Wang
OBJECTIVE: Hypertension (HTN) leads to left ventricular (LV) remodeling, which results in diastolic dysfunction in the presence of preserved ejection fraction (EF). The goal of this study was to explore the subclinical left ventricular systolic dysfunction and mechanism of preserved EF using layer-specific quantification of myocardial deformation in patients with HTN. DESIGN AND METHOD: The routine 2D (frame rate >50 Hz) data sets were acquired using GE E9 system in 120 hypertensive patients (73 male, 54 ± 13years, blood pressure = 165 ± 20/ 96 ± 117 mmHg) and 120 age and gender matched normal subjects (124 ± 9/80 ± 8mmHg)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Patricia Reant, Alexandre Metras, Dominique Detaille, Annabel Reynaud, Philippe Diolez, Beatrice Jaspard-Vinassa, Raymond Roudaut, Alexandre Ouattara, Laurent Barandon, Pierre Dos Santos, Stephane Lafitte
BACKGROUND: Left ventricular (LV) afterload could be associated with reduced myocardial contractility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative impact of increased afterload on LV myocardial deformation indices in chronic aortic constriction, with regard to hypertrophy, myocardial fibrosis, and mitochondrial function, and to differentiate acute versus chronic afterload effect. METHODS: Young pigs underwent aortic banding (n = 11) or sham (n = 7) operations...
October 14, 2016: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Anton H Schwabegger
Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum (MIRPE) or similar procedures for pectus excavatum (PE) repair, nowadays no longer performed by one single speciality, may not always achieve sufficient aesthetic results, particularly in the infrapectoral or infraxiphoidal region. Reasons for this include the diaphragm inhibiting correct positioning of the bars, as well as asymmetric deformities which may still be present after remodelling attempts. Furthermore, some cases develop a mild recurrence or partial concavity once the correction bar is removed...
September 2016: Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Donald Nuss, Robert J Obermeyer, Robert E Kelly
Historically, pectus excavatum (PE) was reported to be congenital, but in our experience only 22% are noticed in the first decade of life. Thus far, genetic studies support an autosomal recessive heritability, which coincides with only 40% of our patients having some positive family history, but is also contradictory given a constant sex ratio of 4:1 in favor of males. This inconsistency may be explained by the effect of more than one pectus disease-associated allele. Once the deformity is noticed, it tends to progress slowly until puberty, when rapid progression is often seen...
September 2016: Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Robert E Kelly, Robert J Obermeyer, Donald Nuss
BACKGROUND: Recently, technical improvement in the ability to measure lung function and the severity of chest deformity have enabled progress in understanding the mechanism of limitations of lung function in pectus excavatum. METHODS: After establishing that most patients with pectus excavatum do have symptoms of exercise intolerance, easy fatigability, and shortness of breath with exertion, lung function has been evaluated by a variety of methods in different centers...
September 2016: Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Hyung Joo Park, Kyung Soo Kim
BACKGROUND: Simple external compression of pectus carinatum seems to have its limitations, particularly the repair of asymmetric pectus carinatum or excavatum/carinatum complex. We devised the sandwich technique (press-molding) to remodel the entire chest wall. The purpose of this study is to introduce the sandwich technique and appraise the early results. METHODS: Between January 2007 and January 2016, 523 consecutive patients with pectus carinatum and its variants were analyzed retrospectively...
September 2016: Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Donald Nuss, Robert J Obermeyer, Robert E Kelly
Repair of pectus excavatum began at the beginning of the 20(th) century before endotracheal intubation was standard practice. Surgeons therefore developed techniques that corrected the deformity using an open procedure via the anterior chest wall. Initial techniques were unsatisfactory, but by the 1930s the partial rib resection and sternal osteotomy technique had been developed and was used in combination with external traction post-operatively to prevent the sternum from sinking back into the chest. In 1949, Ravitch recommended complete resection of the costal cartilages and complete mobilization of the sternum without external traction, and in 1961 Adkins and Blades introduced the concept of a substernal strut for sternal support...
September 2016: Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Aran Kanagaratnam, Steven Phan, Vakhtang Tchantchaleishvilli, Kevin Phan
BACKGROUND: Pectus excavatum is the most common congenital chest wall deformity. The two most common surgical techniques for its correction are the modified Ravitch technique and the minimally invasive Nuss technique. Despite both procedures being used widely, data comparing them are scarce. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies to evaluate these procedures. A systematic search of the literature was performed from six electronic databases...
September 2016: Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Sergio Ruiz de Galarreta, Raúl Antón, Aitor Cazon, Gorka S Larraona, Ender A Finol
An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent focal dilatation of the abdominal aorta at least 1.5 times its normal diameter. The criterion of maximum diameter is still used in clinical practice, although numerical studies have demonstrated the importance of other biomechanical factors. Numerical studies, however, must be validated experimentally before they can be clinically implemented. We have developed a methodology for manufacturing anisotropic AAA replicas with non-uniform wall thickness. Different composites were fabricated and tested, and one was selected in order to manufacture a phantom with the same properties...
October 10, 2016: Medical Engineering & Physics
P Gouda, J Chua, D Langan, T Hannon, A Scott, A O'Regan
BACKGROUND: While domiciliary non-invasive ventilation (NIV) was initially used in the treatment of respiratory failure resulting from chest wall deformity, the main indication is now chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with recurrent exacerbations associated with type 2 respiratory failure. A longitudinal study of domiciliary NIV provides insights into the evolution of this treatment in the west of Ireland. METHODS: The cohort of patients receiving new prescriptions for domiciliary NIV from Galway University Hospital from 2000 to 2012 was reviewed using study coordinator chart reviews and telephone follow-ups...
October 15, 2016: Irish Journal of Medical Science
Sabha Bhatti, Srikanth Vallurupalli, Stephanie Ambach, Adam Magier, Evan Watts, Vien Truong, Abdul Hakeem, Wojciech Mazur
Cardiac MRI is frequently used in the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. Feature tracking is a novel method of analyzing myocardial strain at the myocardial borders. We investigated myocardial deformation mechanics of both the right and left ventricles in patients with multiple myeloma with suspected cardiac amyloidosis. Comprehensive strain analysis was performed in 43 patients with multiple myeloma and suspected cardiac amyloidosis. MRI strain by feature tracking was measured using 2D cardiac performance analysis MR software (Tomtec, Germany)...
October 14, 2016: International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging
Jaya Kumar Alageshan, Yashodhan Hatwalne, Murugappan Muthukumar
When an entangled interpenetrating collection of long flexible polymer chains dispersed in a suitable solvent is cooled to low enough temperatures, thin lamellar crystals form. Remarkably, these lamellae are sectored, with several growth sectors that have differing melting temperatures and growth kinetics, eluding so far an understanding of their origins. We present a theoretical model to explain this six-decade-old challenge by addressing the elasticity of fold surfaces of finite-sized lamella in the presence of disclination-type topological defects arising from anisotropic line tension...
September 2016: Physical Review. E
L L Xiao, Y Liu, S Chen, B M Fu
Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to the microvessel wall largely depends on the blood hydrodynamic conditions, one of which is the blood viscosity. Since blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, whose viscosity increases with hematocrit, in the microvessels at low shear rate. In this study, the effects of hematocrit, vessel size, flow rate and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on adhesion of a CTC in the microvessels were numerically investigated using dissipative particle dynamics. The membrane of cells was represented by a spring-based network connected by elastic springs to characterize its deformation...
October 13, 2016: Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology
Jakob Buchheim, Hyung Gyu Park
Polymer melt infiltration is one of the feasible methods for manufacturing filter membranes out of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on large scales. Practically, however, its process suffers from low yields, and the mechanism behind this failure is rather poorly understood. Here, we investigate a failure mechanism of polymer melt infiltration of vertical aligned (VA-) CNTs. In penetrating the VA-CNT interstices, polymer melts exert a capillarity-induced attractive force laterally on CNTs at the moving meniscus, leading to locally agglomerated macroscale bunches...
October 13, 2016: Nanotechnology
Yong-Jiang Zhang, Fulton E Rockwell, Adam C Graham, Teressa Alexander, N Michele Holbrook
We report a novel form of xylem dysfunction in angiosperms: reversible collapse of the xylem conduits of the smallest vein orders that demarcate and intrusively irrigate the areoles of Quercus rubra leaves. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy revealed gradual increases in collapse from ~ -2 MPa down to ~ -3 MPa, saturating thereafter (to -4 MPa). Over this range cavitation remained negligible in these veins. Imaging of rehydration experiments showed spatially variable recovery from collapse within 20 seconds, and complete recovery after two minutes...
October 12, 2016: Plant Physiology
Hua Shen, Yong Zhu, Kai-Rong Qin
The electrical conductivity of pulsatile blood flow in arteries is an important factor for the application of the electrical impedance measurement system in clinical settings. The electrical conductivity of pulsatile blood flow depends not only on blood-flow-induced red blood cell (RBC) orientation and deformation but also on artery wall motion. Numerous studies have investigated the conductivity of pulsatile blood based on a rigid tube model, in which the effects of wall motion on blood conductivity are not considered...
October 8, 2016: Medical Engineering & Physics
Aniruddha Samanta, Himel Chakraborty, Manjima Bhattacharya, Jiten Ghosh, Monjoy Sreemany, Sandip Bysakh, Ramkrishna Rane, Alphonsa Joseph, Ghanshyam Jhala, Subroto Mukherjee, Mitun Das, Anoop K Mukhopadhyay
AISI 316L is a well known biocompatible, austenitic stainless steel (SS). It is thus a bio-steel. Considering its importance as a bio-prosthesis material here we report the plasma nitriding of AISI 316L (SS) followed by its microstructural and nanotribological characterization. Plasma nitriding of the SS samples was carried out in a plasma reactor with a hot wall vacuum chamber. For ease of comparison these plasma nitrided samples were termed as SSPN. The experimental results confirmed the formations of an embedded nitrided metal layer zone (ENMLZ) and an interface zone (IZ) between the ENMLZ and the unnitrided bulk metallic layer zone (BMLZ) in the SSPN sample...
September 15, 2016: Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
Tao Feng, David A Hoagland, Thomas P Russell
At appropriate conditions, water-dispersed acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) co-assemble at the oil/water interface with toluene-dissolved amine-terminated polystyrene (PS-NH2) to form composite thin films displaying pronounced interfacial viscoelasticity. To probe this viscoelasticity, the films were examined under dilatational deformations of pendant drop tensiometry/rheometry, with storage and loss moduli recorded against frequency ω (0.003 < ω < 3 Hz) and time-dependent relaxation modulus recorded against time t (0...
October 6, 2016: Soft Matter
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