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R Crippa, M Paglia, F Ferrante, A Ottonello, F Angiero
: BACKGROUND Often breastfeeding problems experienced by mothers and their babies may be attributed to the abnormal attachment of the infant's tongue (ankyloglossia) and/or maxillary lip-tie. Proper breastfeeding depends upon an infant's ability to correctly latch onto its mother's breast. If born with oral soft tissue abnormalities such as tongue-tie or lip-tie, it may be almost impossible for the infant to breastfeed. During the oral evaluation of an infant presenting with breastfeeding problems, one factor that is often overlooked and undiagnosed - and thus untreated - is the attachment of the upper lip to the maxillary gingival tissue...
September 2016: European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry: Official Journal of European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry
Elvira Ferrés-Amat, Tomasa Pastor-Vera, Paula Rodríguez-Alessi, Eduard Ferrés-Amat, Javier Mareque-Bueno, Eduard Ferrés-Padró
The problems of suction in newborns give rise to multiple consequences for both the mother and the newborn. The objective of this paper is to present a case of ankyloglossia ("tongue-tie") and the suction problems that were treated by a multidisciplinary team. The subject is a 17-day-old male patient, with ankyloglossia and suction problems during breastfeeding (pain in the breastfeeding mother, poor weight gain, and long breastfeeds). The patient followed the circuit established in our centre between the services of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Breastfeeding and Speech Therapy and Orofacial Rehabilitation (CELERE)...
2016: Case Reports in Pediatrics
Bobak A Ghaheri, Melissa Cole, Sarah C Fausel, Maria Chuop, Jess C Mace
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Numerous symptoms may arise that prevent mother-infant dyads from maintaining desired breastfeeding intervals. Investigations into treatments that positively influence breastfeeding outcomes allow for improved patient counseling for treatment decisions to optimize breastfeeding quality. This investigation aimed to determine the impact of surgical tongue-tie/lip-tie release on breastfeeding impairment. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, cohort study from June 2014 to April 2015 in a private practice setting...
September 19, 2016: Laryngoscope
H Karayilmaz, Öe Güngör, S Hanimeli, B Yagmur
Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited disorder affecting the skin and mucous membranes, characterized by blister formation following minor trauma. It is a chronic mechanobullous disease related to the specific abnormal or absent proteins. The disease is associated with conspicuous clinical and oral manifestations. The oral involvement of EB includes generalized enamel hypoplasia, dental caries, limited mouth opening, ankyloglossia, microstomia and obliteration of the vestibule. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a hereditary disorder with dental enamel defects and enamel hypoplasia both in deciduous and permanent dentition...
February 26, 2016: West Indian Medical Journal
Lara Benoiton, Maggie Morgan, Katherine Baguley
OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have shown an association between ankyloglossia (tongue tie) and upper-lip ties to breastfeeding difficulties. Treatment is commonly multidisciplinary involving lactation consultants and surgical management with tongue tie and upper lip tie release. There is currently limited data looking at posterior ankyloglossia and upper lip ties. METHODS: Consecutive patients seen at an ENT outpatient clinic for ankyloglossia and upper-lip ties from May 2014-August 2015 were assessed for an outpatient frenotomy...
September 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Gabriel Ferreira Nicoloso, Iuri Silveira dos Santos, Jorge Abel Flores, Bruno Lopes da Silveira, Marta Dutra Machado Oliveira
Ankyloglossia entails short lingual frenum, impairing satisfactory tongue movement and leading to problems related to deglutition, feeding and diction. This clinical report uses laser technology, rather than traditional surgical procedure with scalpel, to perform a lingual frenulotomy on a 9-year old child diagnosed with ankyloglossia, aiming to investigate more conservative and less traumatic dental procedures. Due to the many advantages of the laser device, such as bloodless surgical field, absence of sutures, minimal swelling and post-surgical pain, the high intensity diode laser is a viable alternative technique in soft tissue surgeries...
2016: Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
A Claire Kenny-Scherber, Jack Newman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: Canadian Family Physician Médecin de Famille Canadien
K S Joseph, Brooke Kinniburgh, Amy Metcalfe, Neda Razaz, Yasser Sabr, Sarka Lisonkova
BACKGROUND: Routine surveillance of congenital anomalies has shown recent increases in ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) in British Columbia, Canada. We examined the temporal trends in ankyloglossia and its surgical treatment (frenotomy). METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort study involving all live births in British Columbia from Apr. 1, 2004, to Mar. 31, 2014, with data obtained from the province's Perinatal Data Registry. Spatiotemporal trends in ankyloglossia and frenotomy, and associations with maternal and infant characteristics, were quantified using logistic regression analysis...
January 2016: CMAJ Open
Sophie Shay, Alisha N West
Ankyloglossia superior (palatoglossal adhesion) is an extremely rare congenital condition with only 14 previously reported cases. When found in conjunction with other congenital abnormalities, such as cleft palate, gastrointestinal malformations, and limb malformations, this anomaly is considered part of ankyloglossia superior syndrome. We present a case of a newborn female found to have ankyloglossia superior syndrome. Surgical repair is also described. We review the available literature and discuss theories regarding the etiology of ankyloglossia superior syndrome...
July 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Phoebus Tsaousoglou, Nikolaos Topouzelis, Ioannis Vouros, Anton Sculean
BACKGROUND: Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital oral anomaly with short, tight, and thick lingual frenulum. It may be asymptomatic or can cause movement limitations of the tongue, speech and articulation difficulties, breastfeeding difficulties in neonates, as well as periodontal and malocclusion problems. The etiopathogenesis of ankyloglossia is unknown; it can occur either as a sole anomaly in the vast majority or in association with other craniofacial anomalies. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this paper were (1) to provide a comprehensive review on the criteria for clinical assessment and diagnosis, etiology and inheritance, and the therapeutic options of ankyloglossia; and (2) to demonstrate the treatment of ankyloglossia by means of frenuloplasty in three cases...
2016: Quintessence International
M Basalamah, K Baroudi
Practitioners and policy-makers need information about the relative frequency of dental anomalies among children in their region. This study investigated the prevalence of different oral anomalies among schoolchildren in Sana'a city, Yemen. A sample of 1000 private and public schoolchildren aged 4-12 years were examined by the same examiner using disposable tongue blades. The total prevalence of oral anomalies was 15.1%, most commonly in boys (male:female ratio 3.2:1) aged 7-12 years. The most prevalent dental anomaly related to hard tissues was tooth hypoplasia (2...
January 2016: Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal, la Revue de Santé de la Méditerranée Orientale
Christine Manipon
BACKGROUND: Our current culture defines breastfeeding and the use of human breast milk as the preferred criterion standard for infant nutrition. Medical and health professionals have a responsibility to support breastfeeding in the mother-infant dyad. This includes the recognition of anatomical barriers to breastfeeding such as a tongue-tie, ankyloglossia. PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to enrich and expand the clinical knowledge of health professionals about the physical assessment of ankyloglossia and its impact on breastfeeding...
April 2016: Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses
Sody A Naimer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2016: Canadian Family Physician Médecin de Famille Canadien
Kritika Jangid, Aurelian Jovita Alexander, Nadathur Doraiswamy Jayakumar, Sheeja Varghese, Pratibha Ramani
Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital anomaly affecting the tongue, which is characterized by thick, short lingual frenulum. This condition causes many difficulties such as limited tongue protrusion, breastfeeding difficulties, speech impairment and lack of self-confidence. It is very rarely associated with any other congenital craniofacial disorders such as cleft lip, X-linked cleft palate, Van der Woude syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Orofacial digital syndrome, Beckwith Weidman syndrome or Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome...
November 2015: Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology
Joeseph Adragna, Morteza Khodaee
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: Journal of Family & Community Medicine
Ashley McPhie, Kimberly Merkel, Michele Lossius, Beverly P Giordano, Maria N Kelly
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: Journal of Pediatric Health Care
Anna Cecilia Vaz, Pavithra M Bai
CONTEXT: Tongue-tie (more formally known as ankyloglossia) is a congenital anomaly characterized by an abnormally short lingual frenulum, which may restrict mobility of the tongue tip impairing its ability to fulfill its functions. The clinical significance of ankyloglossia is varied; rarely symptomatic to a host of problems including infant feeding difficulties, speech disorders, malocclusions, and others. AIMS: The need of this study was to evaluate the occurrence and severity of tongue-tie and its association with the type of malocclusions in two populations and also to correlate the various malocclusion traits with the grades of tongue-tie...
September 2015: Indian Journal of Dental Research: Official Publication of Indian Society for Dental Research
Elvira Ferrés-Amat, Tomasa Pastor-Vera, Eduard Ferrés-Amat, Javier Mareque-Bueno, Jordi Prats-Armengol, Eduard Ferrés-Padró
BACKGROUND: Partial ankyloglossia is a limitation which restricts the possibility of protrusion and elevation of the tip of the tongue due to the shortness of either the lingual frenulum or the genioglossus muscles or both. The principal objective of this paper is to present our protocol of action for the treatment of ankyloglossia. The specific objectives are to study patients with ankyloglossia treated by the Service of Maxillofacial Surgery and the Service of Speech Therapy of our pediatric Hospital, describe the diagnostic procedures, the pre-surgical intervention, the surgical technique undertaken and the post-surgical rehabilitation taking into account the level of collaboration of the patients, and finally, describe the surgical complications and the referral of patients...
January 2016: Medicina Oral, Patología Oral y Cirugía Bucal
Arundeep K Lamba, Kamal Aggarwal, Farrukh Faraz, Shruti Tandon, Kirti Chawla
Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is the result of a short and tight lingual frenum causing difficulty in speech, feeding problems in infants due to the limitation of tongue movement. This report presents a case of a 22-year-old female with tongue-tie who complained of difficulty in speech following which she underwent frenectomy procedure with erbium, chromium: yattrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser without any complications. She was referred to the speech therapist after the procedure.
July 2015: Indian Journal of Dentistry
A Veyssiere, J D Kun-Darbois, C Paulus, A Chatellier, A Caillot, H Bénateau
Ankyloglossia is a common condition. Its prevalence is between 3.2% and 4.8% depending on the series and is largely underestimated given the fact of non-diagnosis when the symptoms are limited. It is defined as a short lingual frenulum resulting in a limitation of the lingual mobility. It is due to a defect in cellular apoptosis embryogenesis between the floor of the mouth and tongue. The result is a fibrous and short lingual frenulum. Several classifications were used to make the diagnosis. However, these are the clinical implications, particularly on food and primarily breastfeeding in the baby and phonation in older children that will motivate the management...
September 2015: Revue de Stomatologie, de Chirurgie Maxillo-faciale et de Chirurgie Orale
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