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Madhab Lamichhane, Joseph C Gardiner, Nicole R Bianco, Steven J Szymkiewicz, Ranjan K Thakur
PURPOSE: The wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) is generally used for short periods of sudden cardiac death (SCD) risk; circumstances may occasionally result in prolonged use (over 1 year). The aim of this study was to determine the benefits and risks of prolonged use in patients with systolic heart failure (HF). METHODS: ZOLL's post-market US database included adult patients (≥18 years) with ischemic and/or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM, NICM) and at least 1 year of use...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology: An International Journal of Arrhythmias and Pacing
Shingo Sasaki, Yoshihiro Shoji, Yuji Ishida, Takahiko Kinjo, Yuichi Tsushima, Maiko Seno, Fumie Nishizaki, Taihei Itoh, Kei Izumiyama, Takashi Yokota, Hiroaki Yokoyama, Masahiro Yamada, Daisuke Horiuchi, Masaomi Kimura, Takumi Higuma, Hirofumi Tomita, Ken Okumura
BACKGROUND: The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) has been expected to play a role as an effective bridge therapy to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation in patients at high risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VA). Although WCD has been available since April 2014 in Japan, its usefulness remains unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: During the early period after hospitalization, patients at high risk of VA after excluding some elderly patients were prescribed WCD...
September 3, 2016: Journal of Cardiology
Nobuhiro Nishii
Arrhythmic management is needed after removal of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Patients completely dependent on CIEDs need temporary device back-up until new CIEDs are implanted. Various methods are available for device back-up, and the appropriate management varies among patients. The duration from CIED removal to implantation of a new CIED also differs among patients. Temporary pacing is needed for patients with bradycardia, a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) or catheter ablation is needed for patients with tachyarrhythmia, and sequential pacing is needed for patients dependent on cardiac resynchronization therapy...
August 2016: Journal of Arrhythmia
Parikshit S Sharma, Pierre Bordachar, Kenneth A Ellenbogen
The implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) has been an effective tool for prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in populations at high risk for life-threatening sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). However, ICD implantation is dependent on defining ventricular substrate, evaluating the future risk of SCD and estimation of the patient's overall survival. The ability to predict risk of SCD is often difficult. If ventricular dysfunction (a surrogate marker for the risk of SCD) improves, ICD therapy may not be indicated...
August 25, 2016: European Heart Journal
Aileen M Ferrick, David Tian, Vijaya Vudathaneni, Olga L Shevchuk, Neal J Ferrick, William Frishman
The use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) has favorably impacted the prevention and treatment of sudden cardiac death (SCD) associated with ventricular arrhythmias. However, there are situations where an ICD cannot be immediately implanted, even though the patient is at high risk for SCD. The wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) is a unique technology that can bridge this gap for patients. The WCD has been demonstrated to terminate ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation if worn and used correctly...
November 2016: Cardiology in Review
D Duncker, J Bauersachs, C Veltmann
In the majority of cases sudden cardiac death (SCD) is caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) represent an evidence-based and established method for prevention of SCD. For patients who do not fulfill the criteria for guideline-conform implantation of an ICD but still have an increased, e.g. transient risk for SCD, a wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) vest was developed to temporarily prevent SCD. Numerous studies have shown the safety and efficacy of the WCD, although there is still a gap in evidence concerning a reduction in overall mortality and improvement in prognosis...
September 2016: Der Internist
Nadine K Wäßnig, Michael Günther, Silvio Quick, Christian Pfluecke, Fabian Rottstädt, Steven J Szymkiewicz, Steven Ringquist, Ruth H Strasser, Uwe Speiser
BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) for use and effectiveness in preventing sudden death caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmia or fibrillation. METHODS: From April 2010 through October 2013, 6043 German WCD patients (median age, 57 years; male, 78.5%) were recruited from 404 German centers. Deidentified German patient data were used for a retrospective, nonrandomized analysis. RESULTS: Ninety-four patients (1...
August 30, 2016: Circulation
Vicky J Young, Syed F Ahmad, Jeremy K Brown, W Colin Duncan, Andrew W Horne
STUDY QUESTION: Is inhibitor of DNA-binding protein 2 (ID2) a mediator of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced Warburg-like effect seen in the peritoneum of women with endometriosis? SUMMARY ANSWER: The TGF-β1-induced changes in the metabolic phenotype of peritoneal mesothelial cells from women with endometriosis are mediated through the ID2 pathway. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: TGF-β1 induces the metabolic conversion of glucose to lactate via aerobic glycolysis (the 'Warburg effect') in the peritoneum of women with endometriosis, through increased expression of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-1α)...
September 2016: Molecular Human Reproduction
David E Kandzari, Ramu Perumal, Deepak L Bhatt
BACKGROUND: Autopsy studies imply that recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) accounts for the majority of sudden death early after acute MI, rather than primary arrhythmia. However, diagnosis of recurrent MI by autopsy is challenging and excludes electrocardiographic data to adjudicate arrhythmic causes. We examined the frequency of ischemia prior to treated ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF) and outcomes in patients using the wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) following acute MI...
July 2016: Clinical Cardiology
Alon Barsheshet, Theodora Vamvouris, Ilan Goldenberg
INTRODUCTION: Ventricular tachyarrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation) can lead to aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death in patients with poor left ventricular function early after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Although it has been shown that the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) can treat ventricular tachyarrhythmias and save lives in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, it's use during the early phase post AMI has not been shown to reduce mortality...
July 2016: Expert Review of Medical Devices
Madhab Lamichhane, Abdul Safadi, Phani Surapaneni, Negar Salehi, Ranjan K Thakur
The United States Food and Drug Administration has approved the wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) for use in patients who are at high risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and who do not yet have an established indication for an implantation cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or have contraindications for device implantation for various reasons. The WCD is typically used for primary prevention in (1) high-risk patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35 % after recent acute myocardial infarction (MI) during the 40-day ICD waiting period, (2) before and after coronary artery bypass graft or percutaneous coronary intervention during the 90-day ICD waiting period, (3) after recently diagnosed nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NICM) during the 3- to 9-month medical therapy optimization period, or (4) for those with inherited proarrhythmic conditions such as long QT syndrome or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy...
August 2016: Current Cardiology Reports
Christopher S Simpson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 12, 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Negar Salehi, Mojdeh Nasiri, Nicole R Bianco, Madalina Opreanu, Vini Singh, Vaibhav Satija, Aravdeep S Jhand, Lilit Karapetyan, Abdul Rahman Safadi, Phani Surapaneni, Ranjan K Thakur
BACKGROUND: The wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) is often used in patients at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) who are not yet candidates for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Newly diagnosed cardiomyopathy may be reversible, and a WCD may protect patients during the initial period of risk. We evaluate the benefit and compliance of the WCD in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). METHODS: We reviewed a national database of patients with NICM who used WCDs and who self-reported a history of excess alcohol use, although other causes of cardiomyopathy could not be excluded...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Jun Kishihara, Shinichi Niwano, Hironori Nakamura, Tazuru Igarashi, Naruya Ishizue, Tamami Fujiishi, Jun Oikawa, Masami Murakami, Hidehira Fukaya, Junya Ako
The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) represents an alternative clinical approach to prevent sudden cardiac death as a bridge to therapy when making a final decision regarding the need for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), especially in patients who are in the so-called gray zone according to ICD guidelines. Although the WCD system was introduced in Japan in April 2014, data regarding its usage and experience are limited. We report the first case of appropriate shock therapy using the WCD in an outpatient setting in Japan...
February 2016: Journal of Arrhythmia
Radosław Lenarczyk, Tatjana S Potpara, Kristina H Haugaa, Antonio Hernández-Madrid, Elena Sciaraffia, Nikolaos Dagres
The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to collect data on the use of wearable cardioverter-defibrillators (WCDs) among members of the EHRA electrophysiology research network. Of the 50 responding centres, 23 (47%) reported WCD use. Devices were fully reimbursed in 17 (43.6%) of 39 respondents, and partially reimbursed in 3 centres (7.7%). Eleven out of 20 centres (55%) reported acceptable patients' compliance (WCD worn for >90% of time). The most common indications for WCD (8 out of 10 centres; 80%) were covering the period until re-implantation of ICD explanted due to infection, in patients with left ventricular impairment due to myocarditis or recent myocardial infarction and those awaiting heart transplantation...
January 2016: Europace: European Pacing, Arrhythmias, and Cardiac Electrophysiology
Jayasmita Jana, Mainak Ganguly, Bodhisatwa Das, Santanu Dhara, Yuichi Negishi, Tarasankar Pal
We report a simple one-pot synthesis of highly fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) via modified hydrothermal (MHT) treatment of alkaline solution of dopamine and cysteine. These CDs (λex=320 nm, λem=390 nm, and quantum yield ∼ 5.1%) are of ∼ 2-3 nm in diameter. Further attempt of synthesizing CDs in some common water-miscible solvents ends up the fact that the MHT product from acetone medium is nonfluorescent. However, CDs, produced in aqueous medium, are so stable that they can be dried as a deliverable solid (WCD) without any alteration of fluorescing property if reversibly dispersed in water...
April 1, 2016: Talanta
Afsaneh Alavi, Arnon D Cohen, Wayne Gulliver, Alain Brassard, William B Danby, Christos C Zouboulis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2016: Experimental Dermatology
Mohammad Movahedi, Marie-Eve Beauchamp, Michal Abrahamowicz, David W Ray, Kaleb Michaud, Sofia Pedro, William G Dixon
OBJECTIVE: To quantify the risk of incident diabetes mellitus (DM) associated with the dosage, duration, and timing of glucocorticoid (GC) use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We undertook a cohort study using 2 databases: a UK primary care database (the Clinical Practice Research Datalink [CPRD]) including 21,962 RA patients (1992-2009) and the US National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases (NDB) including 12,657 RA patients (1998-2013). Information on the dosage and timing of GC use was extracted...
May 2016: Arthritis & Rheumatology
Mahmoud Rafieian-Kopaie, Hamid Nasri
On February, 2014 World Cancer Day (WCD) was established to raise alertness of cancer and to encourage its prevention, detection, and treatment. In fact, WCD is celebrated every year on the 4(th) of February all over the world to commemorate all the accomplishments of the WHO. In this paper, we aimed to present the scientific evidence for the role of antioxidants in cancer. Damage to cells by reactive oxygen species, especially the damage to DNA, has been found to play a crucial role in the development of cancer...
2015: International Journal of Preventive Medicine
Yu-Feng Yang, Ying-Yang Liao, Xian-Lian Liu, Shu-Guang Su, Lin-Zhu Li, Ning-Fu Peng
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate possible prognostic factors regarding regression and relapse of complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH) and well-differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma (WDC) treated with conservative treatment. METHODS: The retrospective study reviewed clinicopathologic, treatment, regression and relapse data from patients diagnosed with CAH or WDC who were treated with conservative treatment at 4 institutions. Potential factor evaluation was performed. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analyses...
December 2015: Gynecologic Oncology
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