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Dress syndrom

Chonlaphat Sukasem, Chonlawat Chaichan, Thapanat Nakkrut, Patompong Satapornpong, Kanoot Jaruthamsophon, Thawinee Jantararoungtong, Napatrupron Koomdee, Suthida Sririttha, Sadeep Medhasi, Sarawut Oo-Puthinan, Ticha Rerkpattanapipat, Jettanong Klaewsongkram, Pawinee Rerknimitr, Papapit Tuchinda, Leena Chularojanamontri, Napatra Tovanabutra, Apichaya Puangpetch, Wichai Aekplakorn
The HLA-B ∗ 15:02 allele has been reported to have a strong association with carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) in Thai patients. The HLA-B alleles associated with carbamazepine-induced maculopapular exanthema (MPE) and the drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) among the Thai population have never been reported. The aim of the present study was to carry out an analysis of the involvement of HLA-B alleles in carbamazepine-induced cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs) in the Thai population...
2018: Journal of Immunology Research
Wimonchat Tangamornsuksan, Manupat Lohitnavy
Importance: Dapsone-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is a life-threatening adverse drug reaction. Based on available epidemiologic studies, HLA genotypes may play an important role in DHS. Objective: To assess the association between HLA-B*1301 and dapsone-induced cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs). Data Sources: Human studies investigating associations between HLA-B*1301 and dapsone-induced cADRs were systematically searched without language restriction from the inception of each database until September 12, 2017, in PubMed, the Human Genome Epidemiology Network), and the Cochrane Library...
March 14, 2018: JAMA Dermatology
Abhishek De, Murlidhar Rajagopalan, Aarti Sarda, Sudip Das, Projna Biswas
Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, is also known as drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome and by various other names. It is now recognised as one of the severe cutaneous adverse reaction (SCAR) and can be potentially life-threatening. Historically, it was most frequently linked with phenytoin and was initially described as phenytoin hypersensitivity syndrome. However, it was later found to be caused by various other medications. Anticonvulsants and sulfonamides are the most common offender...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Dermatology
Fanping Yang, Sheng-An Chen, Xiaojin Wu, Qingyuan Zhu, Xiaoqun Luo
Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is characterised by skin rash and multivisceral involvement. The liver is the organ most frequently affected and the degree of liver function impairment often correlates with the mortality rate of DRESS. We aimed to examine the expression of cytotoxic proteins, including soluble Fas ligand (sFasL), TNF-α, granulysin, perforin, and granzyme B in the sera and skin lesions of patients with DRESS and evaluate their clinical significance. Our cohort consisted of 21 patients with DRESS and control groups including 39 patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, 21 patients with maculopapular eruption, and 29 normal controls...
February 1, 2018: European Journal of Dermatology: EJD
Sapan Kumar Behera, Saibal Das, Alphienes Stanley Xavier, Sandhiya Selvarajan
Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a serious and potentially fatal adverse effect to therapeutic medications. The incidence of this condition varies among different ethnicities because of the difference in the genetic makeup. Though fever, rash and eosinophilia are essential features for the diagnosis of this syndrome, these vary from patient to patient along with the involvement of various organs such as liver, kidney, lungs, pancreas, etc. Some of the atypical features are dysphagia, agranulocytosis, and chylous ascites...
March 8, 2018: Hospital Practice (Minneapolis)
Gordon Parker
OBJECTIVES: To detail some serious lamotrigine side effects and their management, and raise awareness about the possible lack of quality control of some brands of lamotrigine. METHODS: A literature review is provided and some personal observations added. RESULTS: While most psychiatrists are aware of the risks of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), awareness of two other serious side effects - toxic epidermal necrosis (TEN) and drug-related eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) - is seemingly lower...
February 1, 2018: Australasian Psychiatry: Bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Min-Suk Yang, Ju-Young Kim, Min-Gyu Kang, Suh-Young Lee, Jae-Woo Jung, Sang-Heon Cho, Kyung-Up Min, Hye-Ryun Kang
Background/Aims: There are only a few reports on the direct costs of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), including drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), despite the tremendous negative impact these reactions can have on patients. We estimated the direct costs of treating SCARs. Methods: Patients admitted to a tertiary teaching hospital for the treatment of SCARs from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010 were included...
February 23, 2018: Korean Journal of Internal Medicine
Yesenia Bello-Hernández, Jessica Espinoza-Hernández, Gabriela Moreno-Coutiño
Topiramate is an antiepileptic drug that can also be used for migraine prophylaxis, weight control, and even for methamphetamine dependence; the dosage margin is wide, and the list of side effects is shorter than with other anticonvulsants. We present the case of a 35-year-old man with a disseminated rash of the trunk and extremities after treatment with 25 mg of topiramate daily as a prophylactic migraine treatment. This case report is useful, as this patient was not polymedicated and had a score of 7 on the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale...
January 2018: Skin Appendage Disorders
E D Shirley, V Mai, K M Neal, G M Kiebzak
Purpose: Acute compartment syndrome often requires additional surgery to achieve wound closure. Little information exists regarding the expected number of surgeries, techniques and complications after closure in paediatric patients. Methods: A retrospective chart review identified patients treated for acute compartment syndrome at four hospitals over a ten-year period. The cause of injury, type of dressing, number of surgeries, type of closure and complications were recorded...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Children's Orthopaedics
Jared James, Yasser M Sammour, Andrew R Virata, Terri A Nordin, Igor Dumic
BACKGROUND DRESS is a rare, life threatening syndrome that occurs following exposure to certain medications, most commonly antibiotics and antiepileptics. While sulfonamide antibiotics are frequently implicated as causative agents for DRESS syndrome, furosemide, a nonantibiotic sulfonamide, has not been routinely reported as the causative agent despite its widespread use. CASE REPORT A 63 year old male who started furosemide for lower extremity edema 10 weeks prior presented with diarrhea, fever of 39.4°C, dry cough and maculopapular rash involving >50% of his body...
February 14, 2018: American Journal of Case Reports
Dorota Mehrholz, Anna Emilia Urban, Marta Herstowska, Roman Nowicki, Wiesław Cubała, Wioletta Barańska-Rybak
OBJECTIVES: DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic syndrome) is qualified as hypersensitivity after drug reaction. This syndrome may occur due to any medication intake. There are three main groups of symptoms defining DRESS: skin lesions, hematological abnormalities and internal organ involvement. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed on a group of 261 patients with drug reactions hospitalized in the Clinic of Dermatology from 2004 until 2017...
December 30, 2017: Psychiatria Polska
U D Kombila, W Ka, F B R Mbaye, N F Diouf, L Fall, P Ouedraogo, A N E Koutonin, Y Dia Kane, N Oumar Toure Badiane
INTRODUCTION: The Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom (DRESS) is a severe drug-induced reaction. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 35-year-old man treated by RHEZ for a first episode of a smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and who developed a DRESS syndrome due to pyrazinamide after twenty days of treatment, associated with a viral reactivation to Human Herpes Virus 6 (HHV6). He had a skin eruption, liver involvement and hypereosinophilia...
January 2018: Revue des Maladies Respiratoires
Tomasz Miłek, Krzysztof Baranowski, Piotr Zydlewski, Piotr Ciostek, Krzysztof Mlosek, Wojciech Olszewski
Introduction: It has been demonstrated that plasma growth factor (PGF) responsible for proliferation of smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts significantly shortens treatment duration. Aim: To determine the role of human growth factor in the healing of ulcers due to ischaemic diabetic foot syndrome (DFS) following previous angioplasty of the blood vessels of the lower leg and foot. Material and methods: The study group included 50 patients with ischaemic diabetic foot complicated by lower leg ulcers in which angioplasty of the stenotic arteries in the distal lower leg and foot was performed...
December 2017: Postȩpy Dermatologii i Alergologii
Timothy J Watts, Philip H Li, Rubaiyat Haque
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 30, 2018: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in Practice
H Ben Romdhane, Z Chadli, N Ben Fredj, A Chaabane, N A Boughattas, K Aouam
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 30, 2018: Médecine et Maladies Infectieuses
Linda Chan, Charles Chan, David K Cook
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: JAAD Case Reports
Jianhua Liang, Hui Qu, Xiaowen Wang, Aiping Wang, Lingling Liu, Ping Tu, Ruoyu Li, Mingyue Wang
Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a hypersensitivity reaction characterized by maculopapular rash, exfoliative dermatitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, eosinophilia, and involvement of internal organs. Evidence for reactivation of herpes family viruses has been observed in some DRESS patients, and activated CD8+ T lymphocytes are largely directed against Epstein-Barr virus. Here, we report two cases complicated with this infection. Both patients received antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs...
February 2018: Annals of Dermatology
Irvin Suástegui-Rodríguez, Karin Ivette Campos-Jiménez, Judith Domínguez-Cherit, Silvia Méndez-Flores Malvido-Torres
Adverse cutaneous reactions to drugs are any undesirable change in the structure or function of the skin. These are among the adverse side effects to common drugs. The most commonly implicated drugs are antibiotics and anticonvulsants. Cutaneous clinical manifestations are diverse ranging from mild or moderate reactions, such as urticaria and maculopapular rash, to severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR), which are known due to their high morbidity and mortality (among these: Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS)...
January 2018: Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social
Cynthia M Magro, Brianne H Daniels, A Neil Crowson
Atypical lymphocytic infiltrates of the skin comprise a broad spectrum of entities ranging from benign infiltrates to those that are malignant. Many of these infiltrates are in fact reactive lymphomatoid ones related to drug therapy falling under the general category of drug associated pseudolymphoma. Within this nosologic umbrella are nodular and diffuse infiltrates resembling low grade T and B cell lymphoma consistent with lymphocytoma cutis, drug associated reversible T cell dyscrasias which draw a strong morphologic and phenotypic parallel with mycosis fungoides and the various pre-lymphomatous T cell dyscrasias, and angiocentric CD30 positive infiltrates mirroring lymphomatoid papulosis...
January 17, 2018: Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology
E Özkaya, S Kılıç
Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are the mainstay of treatment for 1% of the human population suffering from epilepsy.1 They are also increasingly used for several non-epileptic neurological conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia, neuropathic pain syndromes, migraine and psychiatric disorders.2 Three percent of patients who receive AEDs experience adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR),3 which can range across a wide spectrum from mild to moderate eruptions, such as maculopapular rash and, urticaria, to severe and life-threatening conditions, such as drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN)...
January 22, 2018: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
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