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Manish Raturi, Shamee Shastry, Mohandoss Murugesan, Poornima B Baliga, Kalyana Chakravarthy
BACKGROUND: Conventional coagulation screening tests such as Prothrombin time, International normalized ratio (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time are often used to predict bleeding in various clinical situations. We aimed to observe the effect of Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) on these parameters. Methods: Patients' demographics, pre- and post-transfusion coagulation parameters were noted to assess the level of correction. The magnitude of improvement in INR was determined using the formula given by Holland and Brooks...
January 2018: Asian Journal of Transfusion Science
Jacob Arnold, Jennifer Tango, Ian Walker, Chris Waranch, Joshua McKamie, Zafrina Poonja, Anne Messman
Introduction: Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS) addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. Methods: A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians) Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases...
March 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Lianne Remijn, Lenie van den Engel-Hoek, Ton Satink, Bert J M de Swart, Maria W G Nijhuis-van der Sanden
OBJECTIVE: The impact of difficulties with eating and drinking in adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy is unknown. The purpose of this study is to find out which difficulties adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy experience with eating and drinking in daily life and how they deal with these difficulties. The study also explores how they think about themselves with respect to eating and what does or does not help regarding social participation. METHOD: We collected the data from ten participants with spastic cerebral palsy (aged 15-23 years) living in the Netherlands...
March 21, 2018: Disability and Rehabilitation
Hilary Weingarden, Ashley M Shaw, Katharine A Phillips, Sabine Wilhelm
Shame is a distressing emotion experienced when individuals judge themselves in a broadly negative and critical manner. Clinical descriptions of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) emphasize the centrality of shame, yet research on shame in BDD remains scarce. This study is the largest investigation of shame in clinically diagnosed individuals with BDD, and it is the first to examine whether shame changes with treatment. Eighty-three adults with BDD were treated with 14 weeks of open-label escitalopram. Shame was measured using the Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form...
March 19, 2018: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
(no author information available yet)
Reports an error in "Assault-related shame mediates the association between negative social reactions to disclosure of sexual assault and psychological distress" by Christopher R. DeCou, Trevor T. Cole, Shannon M. Lynch, Maria M. Wong and Kathleen C. Matthews ( Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy , 2017[Mar], Vol 9[2], 166-172). In the article, there was an error in the coding of missing values thus effecting the abstract, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections. The frequency counts for sexual assault victimization, reactions to social disclosure, and assault-related shame were calculated incorrectly due to an error in the coding of missing values, and have been corrected in the description of participants and in the results and discussion sections...
March 2018: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy
Blake M Riek, Christin C DeWit
The current study examines age-related differences and similarities in forgiveness seeking. Students in third, seventh, and 12th grade imagined themselves committing various transgressions and the characteristics of these transgression (e.g., severity of consequences, type of offense) were manipulated. Across the age groups, forgiveness seeking was predicted by guilt, whereas withdrawal was predicted by shame. For all age groups, forgiveness seeking was more likely to occur when the offense was an active one rather than a failure to act...
March 1, 2018: Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin
Molly J Dingel, Jenny Ostergren, Kathleen Heaney, Barbara A Koenig, Jennifer McCormick
The gene has infiltrated the way citizens perceive themselves and their health. However, there is scant research that explores the ways genetic conceptions infiltrate individuals' understanding of their own health as it relates to a behavioral trait, like addiction. Do people seeking treatment for addiction ground their self-perception in biology in a way that shapes their experiences? We interviewed 63 participants in addiction treatment programs, asking how they make meaning of a genetic understanding of addiction in the context of their recovery, and in dealing with the stigma of addiction...
December 2017: BioSocieties
Amy E Mitchell, Koa Whittingham, Stanley Steindl, James Kirby
To evaluate the acceptability and potential utility of a small package of online resources designed to improve self-compassion for mothers of infants. A within-groups repeated-measures study design was used. A community sample of 262 mothers who were ≤ 24 months post-partum were given access to a set of online resources (two videos plus a tip sheet) that outlined simple techniques for increasing self-compassion drawn from compassion-focused therapy (CFT). Participants completed pre-intervention assessment, followed by post-intervention assessment 1 month later...
March 17, 2018: Archives of Women's Mental Health
Gwyn Bevan, Alice Evans, Sabina Nuti
This paper explores what motivates improved health care performance. Previously, many have thought that performance would either improve via choice and competition or by relying on trust and altruism. But neither assumption is supported by available evidence. So instead we explore a third approach of reciprocal altruism with sanctions for unacceptably poor performance and rewards for high performance. These rewards and sanctions, however, are not monetary, but in the form of reputational effects through public reporting of benchmarking of performance...
March 16, 2018: Health Economics, Policy, and Law
Sara Johnsdotter
Purpose of Review: The purpose of this review was to explore current research on the impact of migration on issues related to female genital cutting and sexuality. Recent Findings: There is growing evidence that migration results in a broad opposition to female genital cutting among concerned migrant groups in western countries. In addition, after migration, affected women live in the midst of a dominant discourse categorizing them as "mutilated" and sexually disfigured...
2018: Current Sexual Health Reports
Cristiano Scandurra, Vincenzo Bochicchio, Anna Lisa Amodeo, Concetta Esposito, Paolo Valerio, Nelson Mauro Maldonato, Dario Bacchini, Roberto Vitelli
Transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) people are a highly-stigmatized population. For this reason, they might internalize society's normative gender attitudes and develop negative mental health outcomes. As an extension of the minority stress model, the psychological mediation framework sheds light on psychological processes through which anti-transgender discrimination might affect mental health. Within this framework, the current study aimed at assessing in 149 TGNC Italian individuals the role of internalized transphobia as a mediator between anti-transgender discrimination and mental health, considering resilience as the individual-level coping mechanism buffering this relationship...
March 13, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Carmen H Logie, Candice L Lys, Nicole Schott, Lisa Dias, Makenzie R Zouboules, Kayley Mackay
Scant research has addressed health and well-being among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) persons in the Arctic. The Northwest Territories (NWT) has among Canada's highest rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). LGBTQ persons in NWT are at the nexus of LGBTQ and Arctic health disparities. Yet little is known of their sexual health needs. This qualitative study explored the sexual health needs of LGBTQ persons in the NWT. We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 51 participants, including 16 LGBTQ youth aged 15-24, 21 LGBTQ adults aged 25 and above, and 14 key informants who worked with LGBTQ persons...
March 13, 2018: Global Public Health
Margaret McCartney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 12, 2018: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Gadi Zerach, Yossi Levi-Belz
OBJECTIVES: We aim to examine the link between exposure to potentially morally injurious events (PMIEs) and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS). We also aim to explore the mediating roles of depressive attributions, trauma-related guilt and shame, and self-disgust in the relationship between PMIEs and PTSS among combat veterans. METHOD: A volunteers' sample of 191 Israeli combat veterans responded to self-report questionnaires in a cross-sectional design study...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Yogev Kivity, Jonathan D Huppert
BACKGROUND: Models of social anxiety emphasize the role of emotion dysregulation, but the nature of these impairments needs clarification. METHODS: We utilized a mixed-method approach to examine impairments in cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression in social anxiety disorder. Forty nine treatment-seeking individuals diagnosed with social anxiety disorder and 35 healthy controls completed self-reports and a lab-based task of suppression and reappraisal...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Affective Disorders
Andrew C Porter, Rachel L Zelkowitz, David A Cole
This study examined the unique associations of shame-proneness and self-criticism to symptoms of disordered eating and depression among 186 undergraduate students. The study also tested the degree to which self-criticism and shame-proneness accounted for the association between disordered eating and depressive symptoms. Both shame-proneness and self-criticism were significantly related to disordered eating and depressive symptoms. Self-criticism was significantly associated with disordered eating and depressive symptoms, over-and-above shame-proneness, but the reverse was not true...
March 3, 2018: Eating Behaviors
Constance Ann Thomas
Incivility is of great concern in nursing, yet little is known about nursing students' encounters with incivility during clinical education. The lived experience of nursing students who encountered uncivil acts (n = 12) was explored through narrative interviews. Themes describing incivility emerged, including covert criticism and open shaming. Students experienced emotional and physical turmoil, and mixed messages that created a paradox. Further research is needed to understand components of incivility and the negative remnants left by uncivil encounters on nursing students...
April 2018: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Katarzyna Naylor, Anna Torres, Robert Gałązkowski, Kamil Torres
INTRODUCTION: Paramedics are at risk of occupational exposure, increased by the immediacy of provided treatment. However, the issue has not been acknowledged by any research in Europe up to date. METHODS: The research aimed at assessing the occupational blood exposure among paramedics in Poland. Respondents represented 21 Polish medical institutions. Their participation was voluntary and anonymous. Paramedics were provided with a self-directed job specific questionnaire adapted to Polish conditions from an original North American version...
March 9, 2018: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics: JOSE
Mario Liong, Grand H-L Cheng
Scholars are divided as to whether sexting-an unprecedented sexual activity using digital media-is objectifying or sexually liberating. One notion is that sexting involves the representation of an individual's sexuality in the presence of others and thus reinforces objectification. Another perspective contends that the self-portrayal of the body in sexting facilitates the exploration of sexual subjectivity and is, therefore, sexually liberating. By testing a model of sexting, objectified body consciousness (body surveillance, body shame, and body control beliefs), and comfort with nudity (indicator of sexual liberation) on 361 college students in Hong Kong, the current study revealed that, across genders, sexters demonstrated higher levels of body surveillance, body shame, and comfort with nudity than nonsexters...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Sex Research
Georgia Smith, Hannah Farrimond
Amid fears about the medicalisation of old age, the high prevalence of sleeping medication use in older cohorts is a significant public health concern. Long-term use is associated with a plethora of negative effects, such as cognitive impairment and risk of addiction. However, little is known about the lived experience of older adults using sleeping medication longer term. Episodic interviews lasting approximately 90 minutes were conducted with 15 independently living adults, aged 65-88 years, who were using sedative-hypnotic or tricyclic sleeping medication for more than 11 years on average...
March 1, 2018: Health (London)
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