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CPAP therapy

Seong Hwan Kim
Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes at optimal dosing, of which one should be a diuretic. Accordingly, it is not synonymous with uncontrolled hypertension. Among a variety of risk factors, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is a common type of sleep-disordered breathing, has been recognized a well-established risk factor for resistant hypertension. Indeed, both European and American guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension stated that OSA is a modifiable cause of resistant hypertension...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Martin Wolley, Diane Cowley, Ashraf Ahmed, Richard Gordon, Michael Stowasser
OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is known to commonly co-exist with primary aldosteronism (PA), but it is unknown if treatment via mineralocorticoid receptor blockade or adrenalectomy (for aldosterone producing adenoma, APA), improves sleep apnoea parameters in these patients. We therefore aimed to determine if specific medical or surgical treatment of PA improves OSA, as measured by the apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI). DESIGN AND METHOD: Patients undergoing diagnostic workup for PA were recruited if they had symptoms suggestive of OSA...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Gang Deng, Zhan-Dong Qiu, Da-Yong Li, Yu Fang, Su-Ming Zhang
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Aldosterone was reported to be increased in patients with OSA and correlated with OSA severity. Many studies investigated the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on plasma aldosterone concentrations (PAC) in OSA patients. The results, however, were inconsistent. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of CPAP therapy on PAC by performing a meta-analysis. Literature search was carried out in electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Cochrane Library, Embase and Web of Science...
October 2016: Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Medical Sciences
Domenico Maurizio Toraldo, Michele De Benedetto, Luana Conte, Francesco De Nuccio
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive interruptions of breathing, causing a Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia (CIH) that can be a key step in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Nowadays, in fact, there is scientific evidence showing the close relationship between OSA and atherosclerosis, even in those patients who do not show co-morbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), cigarette smoking and obesity, which normally are able to activate the endothelium...
October 7, 2016: Current Vascular Pharmacology
E Sh Bairambekov, A V Pevzner, A Yu Litvin, O A Fomicheva
The case history of a 46-year-old patient with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was analyzed. The examination revealed fourth-degree obesity, prior myocardial infarction, persistent atrial fibrillation with nocturnal asystoles lasting as long as 14.3 sec. During selected drug therapy and regular application of secondary ventilation (continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy) used to correct breathing problems, there was a reduction in the signs of circulatory deficiency, cessation of cardiac pauses, and recovery of sinus rhythm...
2016: Terapevticheskiĭ Arkhiv
Diane C Lim, Allan I Pack
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a worldwide disease whose prevalence is increasing as obesity rates increase. The link between obesity and OSA is likely to be the deposition of fat in the tongue, compromising upper airway size. The role of obesity varies in different ethnic groups, with Chinese being particularly sensitive to increases in weight. OSA lends itself to a personalized approach to diagnosis and therapy. For example, different clinical OSA subtypes likely benefit from therapy in different ways. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation is a useful second-line therapy in patients who cannot tolerate continous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines or intraoral devices...
October 5, 2016: Annual Review of Medicine
José Serrano-Pariente, Vicente Plaza, Joan B Soriano, Mercè Mayosc, Antolín López-Viña, César Picado, Laura Vigil
BACKGROUND: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in asthma patients with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) seems to have a favorable impact on asthma, but data are inconsistent due to methodological limitations of previous studies METHODS: Prospective, multicenter study. We examined asthma outcomes after six months of CPAP in 99 adult asthma patients (mean age 57 years) with OSAS (respiratory disturbance index ≥20). Asthma control and quality of life were assessed with the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ), respectively...
October 12, 2016: Allergy
Samuel A Mickelson
Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition, primarily caused by narrowing of the nasal and pharyngeal airway. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is considered the first line of therapy, but long-term compliance is only about 40%, often because of nasal obstruction. Any nasal obstruction can worsen CPAP compliance. Treatment of the nasal obstruction with topical nasal steroid sprays or nasal dilators has been shown to improve sleep disordered breathing. Surgical treatment of nasal obstruction, has been shown to improve sleep disordered breathing, as well as CPAP requirement and compliance with CPAP...
October 6, 2016: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
Katarzyna Foryś, Mariusz Foryś, Katarzyna Piotrowicz
The obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a mortality risk factor of the cardiovascular system diseases. One of the elements of this relationship is the occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias. The arrhytmias in question are resistant to drug therapy so it is suggested to consider electrotherapy. However, the coexistence of OSA and thus recurrent episodes of nocturnal hypoxia, may have significant impact on the diagnosis and the treatment applied as shown in the following cases. In some cases, the decision of electrotherapy should be preceded by the use of therapy with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)...
2016: Wiadomości Lekarskie: Organ Polskiego Towarzystwa Lekarskiego
Mark I Boulos, Sara Elias, Anthony Wan, James Im, Fadi Frankul, Mina Atalla, Sandra E Black, Vincenzo S Basile, Arun Sundaram, Julia J Hopyan, Karl Boyle, David J Gladstone, Richard H Swartz, Brian J Murray
BACKGROUND: Home sleep apnea testing (HSAT) is an alternative to polysomnography for the detection of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We assessed the feasibility of HSAT as an unattended screening tool for patients with a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). AIMS: The primary outcome was the feasibility of unattended HSAT, as defined by analyzability of the data. Secondary outcomes included determining (1) predictors of obtaining nonanalyzable sleep data and (2) time to OSA detection and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) initiation...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases: the Official Journal of National Stroke Association
R Sahni, X Ameer, K Ohira-Kist, J-T Wung
OBJECTIVES: Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is effective in conjunction with tracheal intubation (TI) and mechanical ventilation (MV) for treating arterial pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF) in near-term and term newborns. Non-invasive respiratory support with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is increasingly used to avoid morbidity associated with TI and MV, yet the effectiveness of iNO delivery via nasal CPAP remains unknown. To evaluate the effectiveness of iNO delivered via the bubble nasal CPAP system in term and preterm newborns with HRF...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
Conor P Kerley, Katrina Hutchinson, Jessica Bramham, Aisling McGowan, John Faul, Liam Cormican
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Our group and others have reported a high rate of vitamin D deficiency in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), where vitamin D levels (25(OH)D) correlate negatively with OSAS severity and some of its associated metabolic alterations. Data regarding vitamin D supplementation in OSAS are lacking. We wanted to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 supplementation on OSAS symptoms and metabolic parameters. METHODS: We conducted a pilot, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of daily supplementation with 4,000 IU vitamin D3 (D3) or placebo (PL)...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Gyambo Sithey, Li Ming Wen, Patrick Kelly, Mu Li
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to identify clinical predictors associated with changes in settings for pediatric invasive and noninvasive positive airway pressure therapy, which could help inform the allocation of limited polysomnogram (PSG) resources. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in children who underwent one or more PSGs for technology titration. Children were included if they were using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, bilevel positive airway pressure (BPAP) therapy, or invasive positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) the night of the PSG...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Jeremy E Orr, Carolina Smales, Thomas H Alexander, Carl Stepnowsky, Giora Pillar, Atul Malhotra, Kathleen F Sarmiento
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common among veterans of the military, with sleep disturbance as a hallmark manifestation. A growing body of research has suggested a link between obstructive sleep apnea and PTSD, potentially due to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) related sleep disruption, or via other mechanisms. We examined the hypothesis that treatment of OSA with positive airway pressure would reduce PTSD symptoms over 6 months. METHODS: A prospective study of Veterans with confirmed PTSD and new diagnosis of OSA not yet using PAP therapy were recruited from a Veteran's Affairs sleep medicine clinic...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Katherine E Zychowski, Bethany Sanchez, Rodrigo P Pedrosa, Geraldo Lorenzi-Filho, Luciano F Drager, Vsevolod Y Polotsky, Matthew J Campen
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by intermittent airway obstruction and systemic hypoxia during sleep, which can contribute to an increase in reactive oxygen species, vascular remodeling, vasoconstriction and ultimately cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a clinical therapy that maintains airway patency and mitigates several symptoms of OSA. However, it is currently unknown whether CPAP therapy also reduces the overall inflammatory potential in the circulation; to address this in an unbiased manner, we applied a novel endothelial biosensor approach, the serum cumulative inflammatory potential (SCIP) assay...
September 22, 2016: Atherosclerosis
Zhijun Li, Tingyu Tang, Wenjuan Wu, Liang Gu, Jianzong Du, Tian Zhao, Xiaoxi Zhou, Haiyan Wu, Guangyue Qin
PURPOSE: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that erectile dysfunction (ED) is common in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We also assessed the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for ED and sex hormone levels in patients with severe OSA and ED. METHODS: A total of 153 OSA patients and 60 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained, and blood samples were collected for analysis of sex hormones after polysomnography...
October 2016: Respiratory Medicine
C Heiser, B Hofauer
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease in western industrialized countries with increasing prevalence. Gold standard of therapy is nocturnal positive pressure ventilation by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Due to complications and side effects of ventilation, therapy adherence is limited. Recently an alternative surgical treatment has become available for these patients, which uses established techniques to stimulate the hypoglossus nerve to open the upper airway during sleep. The aim of this work is to provide an overview of the history and current state of scientific knowledge of this therapy in the treatment of OSA...
September 29, 2016: HNO
Steven Kwasi Korang, Joshua Feinberg, Jørn Wetterslev, Janus C Jakobsen
BACKGROUND: Asthma is one of the most common reasons for hospital admission among children and constitutes a significant economic burden. Use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) in the care of children with acute asthma has increased even though evidence supporting the intervention has been considered weak and clinical guidelines do not recommend the intervention. NPPV might be an effective intervention for acute asthma, but no systematic review has been conducted to assess the effects of NPPV as an add-on therapy to usual care in children with acute asthma...
September 30, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Vincent Rigo, Caroline Lefebvre, Isabelle Broux
: Less invasive surfactant therapies (LIST) use surfactant instillation through a thin tracheal catheter in spontaneously breathing infants. This review and meta-analysis investigates respiratory outcomes for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome treated with LIST rather than administration of surfactant through an endotracheal tube. Randomised controlled trial (RCT) full texts provided outcome data for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), death or BPD, early CPAP failure, invasive ventilation requirements and usual neonatal morbidities...
September 27, 2016: European Journal of Pediatrics
Murat Can, Fırat Uygur, Hakan Tanrıverdi, Bilgehan Acıkgoz, Barıs Alper, Berrak Guven
Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep disorder characterized by repeated episodes of apnea and hypopnea during sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective method for treating OSAS and alleviating the patients' symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 3-month CPAP therapy on serum levels of IL-23 in patients with OSAS. Twenty-three patients with newly diagnosed moderate-to-severe OSAS who had not yet started nasal CPAP treatment were prospectively enrolled...
September 24, 2016: Immunologic Research
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