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respiratory physiology ventilation

Michael C Sklar, Karen Burns, Nuttapol Rittayamai, Ashley Lanys, Michela Rauseo, Lu Chen, Martin Dres, Guang-Qiang Chen, Ewan C Goligher, Neill Kj Adhikari, Laurent Brochard, Jan O Friedrich
Introduction Spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs) are designed to simulate conditions following extubation and it is essential to understand the physiological impact of different methods. We conducted a systematic review and pooled measures reflecting patient respiratory effort among studies comparing SBT methods in a meta-analysis. Methods We searched Medline, EMBASE, and Web of Science from inception to January 2016 to identify randomized and non-randomized clinical trials reporting physiological measurements of respiratory effort (pressure-time product, PTP) or work of breathing during at least 2 SBT techniques...
October 21, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Sanjoy K Sureka, Nitesh Patidar, Varun Mittal, Rakesh Kapoor, Aneesh Srivastava, Kamal Kishore, Sanjay Dhiraj, M S Ansari
OBJECTIVE: A safe and optimal pneumoperitoneal pressure (PP) for laparoscopic renal surgery in infants is difficult to define. In a broad sense, a safe and optimal PP should cause least intraoperative and postoperative physiological stress for the infants and should be optimal for surgeon's technical feasibility. Unfortunately, the safe and optimal PP in infant for transperitoneal laparoscopic surgery has not been established by well validated study. To determine safe and optimal PP for laparoscopic renal surgery (LRS) in infants less than 10 kg...
March 4, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Urology
Magnus von Seth, Miklós Lipcsey, Peter Engström, Anders Larsson, Lars Hillered, Enn Maripuu, Charles Widström, Jan Sjölin
Some experimental data suggest that rapid bolus administration of albumin causes less plasma-expanding effects than slow, continuous infusion. To determine whether rapid bolus administration, in comparison with slow infusion, results in greater extravasation of albumin in experimental septic shock we performed a randomized controlled trial with 32 endotoxemic pigs. The animals were monitored and ventilated with standard intensive care equipment and given 10 mL x kg 5% albumin labeled with Technetium-99m, either as a rapid 15-minute bolus (Bolus group, n = 16) or as a 2-hour (h) infusion (Infusion group, n = 16)...
October 5, 2016: Shock
Giovanna Chidini, Daniele De Luca, Giorgio Conti, Paolo Pelosi, Stefano Nava, Edoardo Calderini
OBJECTIVE: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist has been shown to improve patient-ventilator interaction in children with acute respiratory failure. Objective of this study was to compare the effect of noninvasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist versus noninvasive flow-triggered pressure support on patient-ventilator interaction in children with acute respiratory failure, when delivered as a first-line respiratory support. DESIGN: Prospective randomized crossover physiologic study...
September 30, 2016: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Alladi Mohan, G Sivaram Naik, J Harikrishna, D Prabath Kumar, M H Rao, Kvs Sarma, K K Guntupalli
BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Ingestion of Cleistanthus collinus causes hypokalemia and cardiac arrhythmias leading to mortality in most cases. We undertook this retrospective study to evaluate the clinical presentation and predictors of outcome in critically ill patients admitted with C. collinus poisoning. METHODS: The case records of 56 patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) of a tertiary care teaching hospital in south India (2000-2014) with C...
June 2016: Indian Journal of Medical Research
Eric Hermand, François J Lhuissier, Nicolas Voituron, Jean-Paul Richalet
We evaluated the mechanisms responsible for the instability of ventilation control system under simultaneous metabolic (exercise) and environmental (hypoxia) stresses, promoting the genesis of periodic breathing. A model following the main concepts of ventilatory control has been tested, including cardiovascular and respiratory parameters, characteristics of peripheral and central chemoreceptors, at mild exercise in hypoxia (FIO2=0.145). Interaction between O2 and CO2 sensing was introduced following three different modalities...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Theoretical Biology
Alexandra Jochmans-Lemoine, Manju Shahare, Jorge Soliz, Vincent Joseph
We previously reported that rats and mice that have been raised for more than 30 generations in La Paz, Bolivia (3600m), display divergent physiological responses to high altitude (HA), including improved respiratory and metabolic control in mice. In the present study we asked whether these traits would also be present in response to hypoxia at sea level (SL). To answer this question, we exposed rats (SD) and mice (FVB) to normoxia (21% O2) or hypoxia (15 and 12% O2) for 6 hours and measured ventilation and metabolic rate (whole body plethysmography), and expression of the transcription factor HIF-1α (ELISA and Mass Spectrometry) and other proteins whose expression are regulated by hypoxia (Glucose Transporter 1, Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 1, and Angiopoietin 2 - Mass Spectrometry) in the brainstem...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Experimental Biology
Philippe Jolliet, Lamia Ouanes-Besbes, Fekri Abroug, Jalila Ben Khelil, Mohamed Besbes, Aude Garnero, Jean-Michel Arnal, Fabrice Daviaud, Jean-Daniel Chiche, Benoît Lortat-Jacob, Jean-Luc Diehl, Nicolas Lerolle, Alain Mercat, Keyvan Razazi, Christian Brun-Buisson, Isabelle Durand-Zaleski, Joëlle Texereau, Laurent Brochard
RATIONALE: During non-invasive ventilation (NIV) for COPD exacerbations, Helium/Oxygen (He/O2) reduces work of breathing and hypercapnia more than Air/O2 but impact on clinical outcome remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether continuous administration of He/O2 for 72 hours, during and in-between NIV sessions, is superior to Air/O2 in reducing NIV failure (25% to 15%) in severe hypercapnic COPD exacerbations. METHODS: Prospective, randomized, open-label trial (16 intensive care units, 6 countries)...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Gonzalo Hernández, Concepción Vaquero, Laura Colinas, Rafael Cuena, Paloma González, Alfonso Canabal, Susana Sanchez, Maria Luisa Rodriguez, Ana Villasclaras, Rafael Fernández
Importance: High-flow conditioned oxygen therapy delivered through nasal cannulae and noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) may reduce the need for reintubation. Among the advantages of high-flow oxygen therapy are comfort, availability, lower costs, and additional physiopathological mechanisms. Objective: To test if high-flow conditioned oxygen therapy is noninferior to NIV for preventing postextubation respiratory failure and reintubation in patients at high risk of reintubation...
October 5, 2016: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Osama M Assad, Ayman A El Sayed, Mohamed A Khalil
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of pressure-controlled ventilation-volume guaranteed (PCV-VG) and volume controlled ventilation (VCV) on airway pressures and respiratory and circulatory indicators during laparoscopic surgery in Trendelenburg position. DESIGN: Prospective randomized comparative clinical study. SETTING: Tertiary hospital. PATIENTS: Forty ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients who underwent elective laparoscopic surgery in Trendelenburg position...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia
Kelly M Pennington, Erik K St Louis
Unilateral fixed mydriasis can be an ominous sign; however in many cases, it is benign and represents pharmacologic mediated action on the iris dilator or sphincter. Differentiation between pharmacologic mediated anisocoria and physiologic anisocoria can be challenging but may save on costly imaging. An 83 year-old woman was admitted with critical limb ischemia and subsequently developed respiratory failure treated with positive pressure ventilation and ipratropium nebulizers. She was noted to have left unilateral mydriasis without other neurologic deficits...
June 2016: General Medicine: Open Access
Jesper Roed Sorensen, Kristian Hillert Winther, Steen Joop Bonnema, Christian Godballe, Laszlo Hegedus
BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations...
September 27, 2016: Thyroid: Official Journal of the American Thyroid Association
Michal Gur, Karin Yaacoby-Bianu, Anat Ilivitzki, Ronen Bar-Yoseph, Vered Nir, Fahed Hakim, Yazeed Toukan, Lea Bentur
INTRODUCTION: Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a chronic airway disease following an insult to the lower respiratory tract. Lung clearance index (LCI) measures ventilation inhomogeneity and has been studied in cystic fibrosis (CF). We aimed to evaluate LCI in BO and to compare it to LCI in CF patients. METHODS: LCI was measured in BO patients, compared to CF patients, and correlated with spirometry and CT findings. RESULTS: Twenty BO patients and 26 CF patients (with similar mean age and BMI) underwent evaluation...
August 31, 2016: Lung
Samuel Helfer, Joseph Quackenbush, Michael Fletcher, David R Pendergast
BACKGROUND: Climbing and trekking at altitude are common recreational and military activities. Physiological effects of altitude are hypoxia and hyperventilation. The hyperventilatory response to altitude may cause respiratory muscle fatigue and reduce sustained submaximal exercise. Voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea respiratory muscle training (VIHT) improves exercise endurance at sea level and at depth. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that VIHT would improve exercise time at altitude [3600 m (11,811 ft)] compared to control and placebo groups...
August 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Christopher Lotz, Norbert Roewer, Ralf M Muellenbach
Mechanical ventilation is the most commonly used form of respiratory support to restore or maintain adequate gas exchange. However, mechanical ventilation does not provide a physiological form of breathing. Neither does it provide an optimal ventilation / perfusion ratio due to passive movement of the diagphragm favoring the non-dependent parts of the lung. Furthermore, patients are in danger of ventilator-associated/induced lung injury (VALI/VILI). Hence, lung protective ventilation is mandatory in patients with an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and should likewise be used in the operating room...
September 2016: Anästhesiologie, Intensivmedizin, Notfallmedizin, Schmerztherapie: AINS
David Ae Imber, Massimiliano Pirrone, Changsheng Zhang, Daniel F Fisher, Robert M Kacmarek, Lorenzo Berra
With a rising incidence of obesity in the United States, anesthesiologists are faced with a larger volume of obese patients coming to the operating room as well as obese patients with ever-larger body mass indices (BMIs). While there are many cardiovascular and endocrine issues that clinicians must take into account when caring for the obese patient, one of the most prominent concerns of the anesthesiologist in the perioperative setting should be the status of the lung. Because the pathophysiology of reduced lung volumes in the obese patient differs from that of the ARDS patient, the best approach to keeping the obese patient's lung open and adequately ventilated during mechanical ventilation is unique...
September 13, 2016: Respiratory Care
Anna Brzęk, Anna Famuła, Anna Kowalczyk, Ryszard Plinta
BACKGROUND: Wind instruments musicians are particularly prone to excessive respiratory efforts. Prolonged wind instruments performing may lead to changes in respiratory tracts and thus to respiratory muscles overload. It may result in decreasing lung tissue pliability and, as a consequence, in emphysema. Aim of the research has been to describe basic spirometric parameters for wind players and causes of potential changes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Slow and forced spirometry with the use of Micro Lab Viasys (Micro Medical, Great Britain) was conducted on 31 wind musicians (group A)...
2016: Medycyna Pracy
Jonathan Messika, David Hajage, Nataly Panneckoucke, Serge Villard, Yolaine Martin, Emilie Renard, Annie Blivet, Jean Reignier, Natacha Maquigneau, Annabelle Stoclin, Christelle Puechberty, Stéphane Guétin, Aline Dechanet, Amandine Fauquembergue, Stéphane Gaudry, Didier Dreyfuss, Jean-Damien Ricard
BACKGROUND: Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) tolerance is a key factor of NIV success. Hence, numerous sedative pharmacological or non-pharmacological strategies have been assessed to improve NIV tolerance. Music therapy in various health care settings has shown beneficial effects. In invasively ventilated critical care patients, encouraging results of music therapy on physiological parameters, anxiety, and agitation have been reported. We hypothesize that a musical intervention improves NIV tolerance in comparison to conventional care...
2016: Trials
Jorge López, Sarah N Fernández, Rafael González, María J Solana, Javier Urbano, Jesús López-Herce
AIMS: Actual resuscitation guidelines recommend 10 respirations per minute (rpm) for advanced pediatric life support. This respiratory rate (RR) is much lower than what is physiological for children. The aim of this study is to compare changes in ventilation, oxygenation, haemodynamics and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rates with three RR. METHODS: An experimental model of asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) in 46 piglets (around 9.5 kg) was performed. Resuscitation with three different RR (10, 20 and 30 rpm) was carried out...
2016: PloS One
Jerry A Nick, Silvia M Caceres, Jennifer E Kret, Katie R Poch, Matthew Strand, Anna V Faino, David P Nichols, Milene T Saavedra, Jennifer L Taylor-Cousar, Mark W Geraci, Ellen L Burnham, Michael B Fessler, Benjamin T Suratt, Edward Abraham, Marc Moss, Kenneth C Malcolm
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) severity may be influenced by heterogeneity of neutrophil activation. Interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) are a broad gene family induced by Type I interferons, often as a response to viral infections, which evokes extensive immunomodulation. We tested the hypothesis that over- or under-expression of immunomodulatory ISG by neutrophils is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles of circulating neutrophils isolated from patients with sepsis-induced ARDS (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 19) were used to characterize ISG expression...
2016: PloS One
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