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Benjamin J Wolf, Jiyoung Elizabeth Choi, Mark A Exley
iNKT cells are a subset of innate-like T cells that utilize an invariant TCR alpha chain complexed with a limited repertoire of TCR beta chains to recognize specific lipid antigens presented by CD1d molecules. Because iNKT cells have an invariant TCR, they can be easily identified and targeted in both humans and mice via standard reagents, making this a population of T cells that has been well characterized. iNKT cells are some of the first cells to respond during an infection. By making different types of cytokines in response to different infection stimuli, iNKT cells help determine what kind of immune response then develops...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Erhao Zhang, Jieyi Gu, Jianpeng Xue, Chenyu Lin, Chen Liu, Mengwei Li, Jingchao Hao, Sarra Setrerrahmane, Xiaowei Chi, Weiyan Qi, Jialiang Hu, Hanmei Xu
BACKGROUND: Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) presented on T cell surfaces enable redirection of T cell specificity, which has enormous promise in antitumor therapy. However, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells cause significant safety challenges, such as cytokine release syndrome and organ toxicities. To enhance the specificity and controllable activity of CAR-T cells, we report a novel switchable dual-receptor CAR-engineered T (sdCAR-T) cell and a new switch molecule of FITC-HM-3 bifunctional molecule (FHBM) in this study...
March 20, 2018: Journal of Hematology & Oncology
Sinem Civriz Bozdağ, Meltem Kurt Yüksel, Taner Demirer
Stem cells can be either totipotent, pluripotent, multipotent or unipotent. Totipotent cells have the capability to produce all cell types of the developing organism, including both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. The Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC) are the first defined adult stem cells (ASC) that give rise to all blood cells and immune system. Use of HSCs for treatment of hematologic malignancies, which is also called bone marrow (BM) transplantation or peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) transplantation is the pioneer of cellular therapy and translational research...
March 20, 2018: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Nan Chen, Xiaoyu Li, Navin K Chintala, Zachary E Tano, Prasad S Adusumilli
Uniform and strong expression of CD19, a cell surface antigen, on cells of B-cell lineage is unique to hematologic malignancies. Tumor-associated antigen (TAA) targets in solid tumors exhibit heterogeneity with regards to intensity and distribution, posing a challenge for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Novel CAR designs, such as dual TAA-targeted CARs, tandem CARs, and switchable CARs, in conjunction with inhibitory CARs, are being investigated as means to overcome antigen heterogeneity. In addition to heterogeneity in cancer-cell antigen expression, the key determinants for antitumor responses are CAR expression levels and affinity in T cells...
March 16, 2018: Current Opinion in Immunology
Zhongzhen Yi, Brooke L Prinzing, Felicia Cao, Stephen Gottschalk, Giedre Krenciute
Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in humans and is virtually incurable with conventional therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy targeting the glioblastoma antigen EphA2 is an attractive approach to improve outcomes because EphA2 is expressed highly in glioblastoma but only at low levels in normal brain tissue. Building upon our previous findings in this area, we generated and evaluated a panel of EphA2-specific CARs. We demonstrate here that T cells expressing CD28...
June 15, 2018: Molecular Therapy. Methods & Clinical Development
Michael C Milone, Vijay G Bhoj
Adoptive cellular therapy using T cells with tumor specificity derived from either natural T cell receptors (TCRs) or an artificial chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has reached late phase clinical testing, with two CAR T cell therapies achieving regulatory approval within the United States in 2017. The effective use of these therapies depends upon an understanding of their pharmacology, which is quite divergent from traditional small molecule or biologic drugs. We review the different types of T cell therapy under clinical development, the factors affecting cellular kinetics following infusion, and the relationship between these cellular kinetics and anti-cancer activity...
March 16, 2018: Molecular Therapy. Methods & Clinical Development
Mark Owyong, Gizem Efe, Michael Owyong, Aamna J Abbasi, Vaishnavi Sitarama, Vicki Plaks
There is a growing list of cancer immunotherapeutics approved for use in a population with an increasing number of aged individuals. Cancer immunotherapy (CIT) mediates tumor destruction by activating anti-tumor immune responses that have been silenced through the oncogenic process. However, in an aging individual, immune deregulation is positively correlated with age. In this context, it is vital to examine the age-related changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME) and specifically, those directly affecting critical players to ensure CIT efficacy...
2018: Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology
Nia Emami-Shahri, Julie Foster, Roxana Kashani, Patrycja Gazinska, Celia Cook, Jane Sosabowski, John Maher, Sophie Papa
The unprecedented efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy of CD19+ B-cell malignancy has established a new therapeutic pillar of hematology-oncology. Nonetheless, formidable challenges remain for the attainment of comparable success in patients with solid tumors. To accelerate progress and rapidly characterize emerging toxicities, systems that permit the repeated and non-invasive assessment of CAR T-cell bio-distribution would be invaluable. An ideal solution would entail the use of a non-immunogenic reporter that mediates specific uptake of an inexpensive, non-toxic and clinically established imaging tracer by CAR T cells...
March 14, 2018: Nature Communications
(no author information available yet)
CAR T cells directed against CSPG4 limit the growth of brain tumors in cultured neurospheres and glioma xenograft mouse models, with no signs of immune escape owing to loss of antigen expression.
March 14, 2018: Cancer Discovery
Brooke L Prinzing, Stephen M Gottschalk, Giedre Krenciute
The outcome for patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains poor, and there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutic approaches. T cells genetically modified with chimeric antigen receptor (CARs) hold the promise to improve outcomes since they recognize and kill cells through different mechanisms than conventional therapeutics. Areas covered: This article reviews CAR design, tumor associated antigens expressed by GBMs that can be targeted with CAR T cells, preclinical and clinical studies conducted with CAR T cells, and genetic approaches to enhance their effector function...
March 13, 2018: Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy
Albert T Gacerez, Charles L Sentman
Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy has shown promise against B cell malignancies in the clinic. However, limited success in patients with solid tumors has prompted the development of new CAR strategies. In this study, a B7H6-specific CAR was combined with different variants of T-bet, a transcription factor that acts as the master regulator to induce a Th1 phenotype in CD4+ T cells, to create more effective CAR T cells. Skewing CD4+ CAR T cells into a Th1 improved CAR T cell functional activity while promoting a robust proinflammatory response against B7H6-expressing tumors...
March 7, 2018: Cancer Gene Therapy
Jessica C Petrov, Masayuki Wada, Kevin G Pinz, Lulu E Yan, Kevin H Chen, Xiao Shuai, Hua Liu, Xi Chen, Lai-Han Leung, Huda Salman, Nabil Hagag, Fang Liu, Xun Jiang, Yupo Ma
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bears heterogeneous cells that can consequently offset killing by single-CAR-based therapy, which results in disease relapse. Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) associated with CD123 expression comprise a rare population that also plays an important role in disease progression and relapse. Here, we report on the robust anti-tumor activity of a compound CAR (cCAR) T-cell possessing discrete scFv domains targeting two different AML antigens, CD123, and CD33, simultaneously. We determined that the resulting cCAR T-cells possessed consistent, potent, and directed cytotoxicity against each target antigen population...
February 25, 2018: Leukemia: Official Journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K
Hisashi Yano, Shin Kaneko
Adoptive cell therapy using tumor-infiltrating T cells has shown durable responses in patients with melanoma, and immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells (TCR-T or CAR-T) is rapidly emerging as a promising treatment, especially for hematological malignancies. However, the progress is limited because of the lack of readily available good-quality human T cells. Although the efficacy of adoptive cell therapy correlates with the quality of infusing T cells, most antigen-specific T cells in patients with cancer have been exhausted...
2018: [Rinshō Ketsueki] the Japanese Journal of Clinical Hematology
Shinichi Kageyama
Cancer immunotherapies using gene-engineered T cells comprise adoptive transfer of T-cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene-transduced T cells. Although CD19-targeting CAR-T cell therapy is the most progressed, wherein B-cell malignancy is treated efficiently, it also induces cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity, which frequently leads to serious adverse events. Of note, TCR-T cell therapy has been primarily used to target melanoma, resulting in 30%-50% of tumor responses. In clinical trials that target NY-ESO-1-expressing synovial sarcoma, a high efficacy of 50%-60% has been obtained...
2018: [Rinshō Ketsueki] the Japanese Journal of Clinical Hematology
Stephen J Bagley, Arati S Desai, Gerald P Linette, Carl H June, Donald M O'Rourke
In patients with certain hematologic malignancies, the use of autologous T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has led to unprecedented clinical responses. Although progress in solid tumors has been elusive, recent clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of CAR T cell therapy for glioblastoma. In addition, despite formidable barriers to T cell localization and effector function in glioblastoma, signs of efficacy have been observed in select patients...
March 2, 2018: Neuro-oncology
Keishi Adachi, Yosuke Kano, Tomohiko Nagai, Namiko Okuyama, Yukimi Sakoda, Koji Tamada
Infiltration, accumulation, and survival of chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells in solid tumors is crucial for tumor clearance. We engineered CAR-T cells to express interleukin (IL)-7 and CCL19 (7 × 19 CAR-T cells), as these factors are essential for the maintenance of T-cell zones in lymphoid organs. In mice, 7 × 19 CAR-T cells achieved complete regression of pre-established solid tumors and prolonged mouse survival, with superior anti-tumor activity compared to conventional CAR-T cells. Histopathological analyses showed increased infiltration of dendritic cells (DC) and T cells into tumor tissues following 7 × 19 CAR-T cell therapy...
March 5, 2018: Nature Biotechnology
Wei Xiong, Yuhui Chen, Xi Kang, Zhiying Chen, Peilin Zheng, Yi-Hsin Hsu, Joon Hee Jang, Lidong Qin, Hao Liu, Gianpietro Dotti, Dongfang Liu
Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cell therapy has the potential to improve the overall survival of patients with malignancies by enhancing the effectiveness of CAR T cells. Precisely predicting the effectiveness of various CAR T cells represents one of today's key unsolved problems in immunotherapy. Here, we predict the effectiveness of CAR-modified cells by evaluating the quality of the CAR-mediated immunological synapse (IS) by quantitation of F-actin, clustering of tumor antigen, polarization of lytic granules (LGs), and distribution of key signaling molecules within the IS...
March 1, 2018: Molecular Therapy: the Journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
Katarzyna C Pituch, Jason Miska, Giedre Krenciute, Wojciech K Panek, Gina Li, Tania Rodriguez-Cruz, Meijing Wu, Yu Han, Maciej S Lesniak, Stephen Gottschalk, Irina V Balyasnikova
In order to fully harness the potential of immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells, pre-clinical studies must be conducted in immunocompetent animal models that closely mimic the immunosuppressive malignant glioma (MG) microenvironment. Thus, the goal of this project was to study the in vivo fate of T cells expressing CARs specific for the MG antigen IL13Rα2 (IL13Rα2-CARs) in immunocompetent MG models. Murine T cells expressing IL13Rα2-CARs with a CD28.ζ (IL13Rα2-CAR.CD28...
February 8, 2018: Molecular Therapy: the Journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
Fabio Cerignoli, Yama A Abassi, Brandon J Lamarche, Garret Guenther, David Santa Ana, Diana Guimet, Wen Zhang, Jing Zhang, Biao Xi
A growing understanding of the molecular interactions between immune effector cells and target tumor cells, coupled with refined gene therapy approaches, are giving rise to novel cancer immunotherapeutics with remarkable efficacy in the clinic against both solid and liquid tumors. While immunotherapy holds tremendous promise for treatment of certain cancers, significant challenges remain in the clinical translation to many other types of cancers and also in minimizing adverse effects. Therefore, there is an urgent need for functional potency assays, in vitro and in vivo, that could model the complex interaction of immune cells with tumor cells and can be used to rapidly test the efficacy of different immunotherapy approaches, whether it is small molecule, biologics, cell therapies or combinations thereof...
2018: PloS One
Rohtesh S Mehta, Katayoun Rezvani
Adoptive cell therapy has emerged as a powerful treatment for advanced cancers resistant to conventional agents. Most notable are the remarkable responses seen in patients receiving autologous CD19-redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells for the treatment of B lymphoid malignancies; however, the generation of autologous products for each patient is logistically cumbersome and has restricted widespread clinical use. A banked allogeneic product has the potential to overcome these limitations, yet allogeneic T-cells (even if human leukocyte antigen-matched) carry a major risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
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