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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28737701/application-of-extrusion-based-hydrogel-bioprinting-for-cartilage-tissue-engineering
#1
REVIEW
Fu You, B Frank Eames, Xiongbiao Chen
Extrusion-based bioprinting (EBB) is a rapidly developing technique that has made substantial progress in the fabrication of constructs for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) over the past decade. With this technique, cell-laden hydrogels or bio-inks have been extruded onto printing stages, layer-by-layer, to form three-dimensional (3D) constructs with varying sizes, shapes, and resolutions. This paper reviews the cell sources and hydrogels that can be used for bio-ink formulations in CTE application. Additionally, this paper discusses the important properties of bio-inks to be applied in the EBB technique, including biocompatibility, printability, as well as mechanical properties...
July 23, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28734756/3d-bioprinting-for-reconstructive-surgery-principles-applications-and-challenges
#2
REVIEW
Zita M Jessop, Ayesha Al-Sabah, Matthew D Gardiner, Emman Combellack, Karl Hawkins, Iain S Whitaker
Despite the increasing laboratory research in the growing field of 3D bioprinting, there are few reports of successful translation into surgical practice. This review outlines the principles of 3D bioprinting including software and hardware processes, biocompatible technological platforms and suitable bioinks. The advantages of 3D bioprinting over traditional tissue engineering techniques in assembling cells, biomaterials and biomolecules in a spatially controlled manner to reproduce native tissue macro-, micro- and nanoarchitectures are discussed, together with an overview of current progress in bioprinting tissue types relevant for plastic and reconstructive surgery...
June 9, 2017: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery: JPRAS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731220/mechanically-tunable-bioink-for-3d-bioprinting-of-human-cells
#3
Aurelien Forget, Andreas Blaeser, Florian Miessmer, Marius Köpf, Daniela F Duarte Campos, Nicolas H Voelcker, Anton Blencowe, Horst Fischer, V Prasad Shastri
This study introduces a thermogelling bioink based on carboxylated agarose (CA) for bioprinting of mechanically defined microenvironments mimicking natural tissues. In CA system, by adjusting the degree of carboxylation, the elastic modulus of printed gels can be tuned over several orders of magnitudes (5-230 Pa) while ensuring almost no change to the shear viscosity (10-17 mPa) of the bioink solution; thus enabling the fabrication of 3D structures made of different mechanical domains under identical printing parameters and low nozzle shear stress...
July 21, 2017: Advanced Healthcare Materials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28726575/bioprinting-pattern-dependent-electrical-mechanical-behavior-of-cardiac-alginate-implants-characterization-and-ex-vivo-phase-contrast-microtomography-assessment
#4
Mohammad Izadifar, Paul Babyn, Michael E Kelly, Dean Chapman, Xiongbiao Chen
Three-dimensional (3D)-bioprinting techniques may be used to modulate electrical/mechanical properties and porosity of hydrogel constructs for fabrication of suitable cardiac implants. Notably, characterization of these properties after implantation remains a challenge, raising the need for the development of novel quantitative imaging techniques for monitoring hydrogel implant behavior in-situ. This study aims to (i) assess the influence of hydrogel bioprinting patterns on electrical/mechanical behavior of cardiac implants based on a 3D-printing technique and (ii) investigate the potential of synchrotron X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (PCI-CT) for estimating elastic modulus/impedance/porosity and microstructural features of 3D-printed cardiac implants in-situ via an ex-vivo study...
July 20, 2017: Tissue Engineering. Part C, Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28724980/handheld-co-axial-bioprinting-application-to-in-situ-surgical-cartilage-repair
#5
Serena Duchi, Carmine Onofrillo, Cathal D O'Connell, Romane Blanchard, Cheryl Augustine, Anita F Quigley, Robert M I Kapsa, Peter Pivonka, Gordon Wallace, Claudia Di Bella, Peter F M Choong
Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is driving major innovations in the area of cartilage tissue engineering. Extrusion-based 3D bioprinting necessitates a phase change from a liquid bioink to a semi-solid crosslinked network achieved by a photo-initiated free radical polymerization reaction that is known to be cytotoxic. Therefore, the choice of the photocuring conditions has to be carefully addressed to generate a structure stiff enough to withstand the forces phisiologically applied on articular cartilage, while ensuring adequate cell survival for functional chondral repair...
July 19, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28715377/creation-of-cardiac-tissue-exhibiting-mechanical-integration-of-spheroids-using-3d-bioprinting
#6
Chin Siang Ong, Takuma Fukunishi, Andrew Nashed, Adriana Blazeski, Huaitao Zhang, Samantha Hardy, Deborah DiSilvestre, Luca Vricella, John Conte, Leslie Tung, Gordon Tomaselli, Narutoshi Hibino
This protocol describes 3D bioprinting of cardiac tissue without the use of biomaterials, using only cells. Cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts are first isolated, counted and mixed at desired cell ratios. They are co-cultured in individual wells in ultra-low attachment 96-well plates. Within 3 days, beating spheroids form. These spheroids are then picked up by a nozzle using vacuum suction and assembled on a needle array using a 3D bioprinter. The spheroids are then allowed to fuse on the needle array...
July 2, 2017: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28707625/bioprinting-of-functional-vascularized-mouse-thyroid-gland-construct
#7
Elena A Bulanova, Elizaveta V Koudan, Jonathan Degosserie, Charlotte Heymans, Frederico DAS Pereira, Vladislav A Parfenov, Yi Sun, Qi Wang, Suraya A Akhmedova, Irina K Sviridova, Natalia S Sergeeva, Georgy A Frank, Yusef D Khesuani, Christophe E Pierreux, Vladimir A Mironov
Bioprinting can be defined as additive biofabrication of 3D tissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids, capable of self-assembly, as building blocks. Thyroid gland, a relatively simple endocrine organ, is suitable for testing the proposed bioprinting technology. Here we report the bioprinting of functional vascularized mouse thyroid gland construct from embryonic tissue spheroids as a proof of concept. Based on the self-assembly principle, we generated thyroid tissue starting from thyroid spheroids (TS) and allantoic spheroids (AS), as a source of thyrocytes and endothelial cells (EC), respectively...
July 14, 2017: Biofabrication
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28697953/3d-in-vitro-models-of-liver-fibrosis
#8
Leo A van Grunsven
Animal testing is still the most popular preclinical assesment model for liver fibrosis. To develop efficient anti-fibrotic therapies, robust and representative in vitro models are urgently needed. The most widely used in vitro fibrosis model is the culture-induced activation of primary rodent hepatic stellate cells. While these cultures have contributed greatly to the current understanding of hepatic stellate cell activation, they seem to be inadequate to cover the complexity of this regenerative response...
July 8, 2017: Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676704/biomaterial-free-three-dimensional-bioprinting-of-cardiac-tissue-using-human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived-cardiomyocytes
#9
Chin Siang Ong, Takuma Fukunishi, Huaitao Zhang, Chen Yu Huang, Andrew Nashed, Adriana Blazeski, Deborah DiSilvestre, Luca Vricella, John Conte, Leslie Tung, Gordon F Tomaselli, Narutoshi Hibino
We have developed a novel method to deliver stem cells using 3D bioprinted cardiac patches, free of biomaterials. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), fibroblasts (FB) and endothelial cells (EC) were aggregated to create mixed cell spheroids. Cardiac patches were created from spheroids (CM:FB:EC = 70:15:15, 70:0:30, 45:40:15) using a 3D bioprinter. Cardiac patches were analyzed with light and video microscopy, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, cell viability assays and optical electrical mapping...
July 4, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676662/directing-the-self-assembly-of-tumour-spheroids-by-bioprinting-cellular-heterogeneous-models-within-alginate-gelatin-hydrogels
#10
Tao Jiang, Jose G Munguia-Lopez, Salvador Flores-Torres, Joel Grant, Sanahan Vijayakumar, Antonio De Leon-Rodriguez, Joseph M Kinsella
Human tumour progression is a dynamic process involving diverse biological and biochemical events such as genetic mutation and selection in addition to physical, chemical, and mechanical events occurring between cells and the tumour microenvironment. Using 3D bioprinting we have developed a method to embed MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells, and IMR-90 fibroblast cells, within a cross-linked alginate/gelatin matrix at specific initial locations relative to each other. After 7 days of co-culture the MDA-MB-231 cells begin to form multicellular tumour spheroids (MCTS) that increase in size and frequency over time...
July 4, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28675678/3d-bioprinting-and-the-current-applications-in-tissue-engineering
#11
REVIEW
Ying Huang, Xiao-Fei Zhang, Guifang Gao, Tomo Yonezawa, Xiaofeng Cui
Bioprinting as an enabling technology for tissue engineering possesses the promises to fabricate highly mimicked tissue or organs with digital control. As one of the biofabrication approaches, bioprinting has the advantages of high throughput and precise control of both scaffold and cells. Therefore, this technology is not only ideal for translational medicine but also for basic research applications. Bioprinting has already been widely applied to construct functional tissues such as vasculature, muscle, cartilage, and bone...
July 4, 2017: Biotechnology Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28670447/short-term-hypoxic-preconditioning-promotes-prevascularization-in-3d-bioprinted-bone-constructs-with-stromal-vascular-fraction-derived-cells
#12
Mitchell A Kuss, Robert Harms, Shaohua Wu, Ying Wang, Jason B Untrauer, Mark A Carlson, Bin Duan
Reconstruction of complex, craniofacial bone defects often requires autogenous vascularized bone grafts, and still remains a challenge today. In order to address this issue, we isolated the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) from adipose tissues and maintained the phenotypes and the growth of endothelial lineage cells within SVF derived cells (SVFC) by incorporating an endothelial cell medium. We 3D bioprinted SVFC within our hydrogel bioinks and conditioned the constructs in either normoxia or hypoxia. We found that short-term hypoxic conditioning promoted vascularization-related gene expression, whereas long-term hypoxia impaired cell viability and vascularization...
June 5, 2017: RSC Advances
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28669949/-three-dimensional-bioprinted-microstructure-promotes-proliferation-and-viability-of-murine-epithelial-stem-cells-in-vitro
#13
Yu-Fan Liu, Sha Huang, Bin Yao, Zhao Li, Xiang Li, Xiao-Bing Fu, Xu Wu
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of different microstructures prepared by three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting on proliferation and viability of the murine epithelial stem cells in vitro. METHODS: 3D cell-laden microstructures were constructed using 3 different printing nozzles with diameters of 210, 340, and 420 µm. Fluorescence microscopy and the live/dead assay kit were used to observe the proliferation and viability of the murine epithelial stem cells in the microstructures...
June 20, 2017: Nan Fang Yi Ke da Xue Xue Bao, Journal of Southern Medical University
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28665236/formation-of-adipose-stromal-vascular-fraction-cell-laden-spheroids-using-a-3d-bioprinter-and-superhydrophobic-surfaces
#14
Brian Gettler, Joseph Zakhari, Piyani Gandhi, Stuart K Williams
The therapeutic infusion of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells (SVF) for the treatment of multiple diseases, has progressed to numerous human clinical trials; however, the often poor retention of the cells following implantation remains a common drawback of direct cell injection. One solution to cellular retention at the injection site has been the use of biogels to encapsulate cells within a microenvironment prior to and upon implantation. The current study utilized 3D bioprinting technology to evaluate the ability to form SVF laden spheroids with collagen I as a gel forming biomatrix...
June 30, 2017: Tissue Engineering. Part C, Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28662187/scientometric-and-patentometric-analyses-to-determine-the-knowledge-landscape-in-innovative-technologies-the-case-of-3d-bioprinting
#15
Marisela Rodríguez-Salvador, Rosa María Rio-Belver, Gaizka Garechana-Anacabe
This research proposes an innovative data model to determine the landscape of emerging technologies. It is based on a competitive technology intelligence methodology that incorporates the assessment of scientific publications and patent analysis production, and is further supported by experts' feedback. It enables the definition of the growth rate of scientific and technological output in terms of the top countries, institutions and journals producing knowledge within the field as well as the identification of main areas of research and development by analyzing the International Patent Classification codes including keyword clusterization and co-occurrence of patent assignees and patent codes...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28660387/3d-bioprinting-technology-scientific-aspects-and-ethical-issues
#16
REVIEW
Sara Patuzzo, Giada Goracci, Rosagemma Ciliberti, Luca Gasperini
The scientific development of 3D bioprinting is rapidly advancing. This innovative technology involves many ethical and regulatory issues, including theoretical, source, transplantation and enhancement, animal welfare, economic, safety and information arguments. 3D bioprinting technology requires an adequate bioethical debate in order to develop regulations in the interest both of public health and the development of research. This paper aims to initiate and promote ethical debate. The authors examine scientific aspects of 3D bioprinting technology and explore related ethical issues, with special regard to the protection of individual rights and transparency of research...
June 28, 2017: Science and Engineering Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647084/bioprinted-three-dimensional-human-tissues-for-toxicology-and-disease-modeling
#17
REVIEW
Deborah G Nguyen, Stephen L Pentoney
The high rate of attrition among clinical-stage therapies, due largely to an inability to predict human toxicity and/or efficacy, underscores the need for in vitro models that better recapitulate in vivo human biology. In much the same way that additive manufacturing has revolutionized the production of solid objects, three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is enabling the automated production of more architecturally and functionally accurate in vitro tissue culture models. Here, we provide an overview of the most commonly used bioprinting approaches and how they are being used to generate complex in vitro tissues for use in toxicology and disease modeling research...
March 2017: Drug Discovery Today. Technologies
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639943/bioprintable-form-of-chitosan-hydrogel-for-bone-tissue-engineering
#18
T Tolga Demirtas, Gülseren Irmak, Menemse Gumusderelioglu
Bioprinting can be defined as the 3D patterning of living cells and other biologics by using a computer-aided layer-by-layer deposition approach. Presence of cells within the ink to usage of a "bio-ink" presents the potential to print of living tissues and organ analogs that can be implanted into damaged/diseased tissue to promote highly controlled cell-based regeneration. In this study, it was shown for the first time that chitosan solution and its composite with nanostructured bone-like hydroxyapatite (HA) can be mixed with cells and printed successfully...
June 22, 2017: Biofabrication
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28634958/bioprinting-cartilage-tissue-from-mesenchymal-stem-cells-and-peg-hydrogel
#19
Guifang Gao, Karen Hubbell, Arndt F Schilling, Guohao Dai, Xiaofeng Cui
Bioprinting based on thermal inkjet printing is one of the most attractive enabling technologies for tissue engineering and regeneration. During the printing process, cells, scaffolds , and growth factors are rapidly deposited to the desired two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) locations. Ideally, the bioprinted tissues are able to mimic the native anatomic structures in order to restore the biological functions. In this study, a bioprinting platform for 3D cartilage tissue engineering was developed using a commercially available thermal inkjet printer with simultaneous photopolymerization ...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28634957/bioprinting-of-3d-tissue-models-using-decellularized-extracellular-matrix-bioink
#20
Falguni Pati, Dong-Woo Cho
Bioprinting provides an exciting opportunity to print and pattern all the components that make up a tissue-cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) material-in three dimensions (3D) to generate tissue analogues. A large number of materials have been used for making bioinks; however, majority of them cannot represent the complexity of natural ECM and thus are unable to reconstitute the intrinsic cellular morphologies and functions. We present here a method for making of bioink from decellularized extracellular matrices (dECMs) and a protocol for bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with this novel bioink...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
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