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3D bioprint

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28337147/3d-proximal-tubule-tissues-recapitulate-key-aspects-of-renal-physiology-to-enable-nephrotoxicity-testing
#1
Shelby M King, J William Higgins, Celina R Nino, Timothy R Smith, Elizabeth H Paffenroth, Casey E Fairbairn, Abigail Docuyanan, Vishal D Shah, Alice E Chen, Sharon C Presnell, Deborah G Nguyen
Due to its exposure to high concentrations of xenobiotics, the kidney proximal tubule is a primary site of nephrotoxicity and resulting attrition in the drug development pipeline. Current pre-clinical methods using 2D cell cultures and animal models are unable to fully recapitulate clinical drug responses due to limited in vitro functional lifespan, or species-specific differences. Using Organovo's proprietary 3D bioprinting platform, we have developed a fully cellular human in vitro model of the proximal tubule interstitial interface comprising renal fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and primary human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells to enable more accurate prediction of tissue-level clinical outcomes...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333087/magnetically-bioprinted-human-myometrial-3d-cell-rings-as-a-model-for-uterine-contractility
#2
Glauco R Souza, Hubert Tseng, Jacob A Gage, Arunmani Mani, Pujan Desai, Fransisca Leonard, Angela Liao, Monica Longo, Jerrie S Refuerzo, Biana Godin
Deregulation in uterine contractility can cause common pathological disorders of the female reproductive system, including preterm labor, infertility, inappropriate implantation, and irregular menstrual cycle. A better understanding of human myometrium contractility is essential to designing and testing interventions for these important clinical problems. Robust studies on the physiology of human uterine contractions require in vitro models, utilizing a human source. Importantly, uterine contractility is a three-dimensionally (3D)-coordinated phenomenon and should be studied in a 3D environment...
March 23, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28320774/3d-bioprint-me-a-socioethical-view-of-bioprinting-human-organs-and-tissues
#3
Niki Vermeulen, Gill Haddow, Tirion Seymour, Alan Faulkner-Jones, Wenmiao Shu
In this article, we review the extant social science and ethical literature on three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting. 3D bioprinting has the potential to be a 'game-changer', printing human organs on demand, no longer necessitating the need for living or deceased human donation or animal transplantation. Although the technology is not yet at the level required to bioprint an entire organ, 3D bioprinting may have a variety of other mid-term and short-term benefits that also have positive ethical consequences, for example, creating alternatives to animal testing, filling a therapeutic need for minors and avoiding species boundary crossing...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314117/three-dimensional-cell-cultures-in-drug-discovery-and-development
#4
Ye Fang, Richard M Eglen
The past decades have witnessed significant efforts toward the development of three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures as systems that better mimic in vivo physiology. Today, 3D cell cultures are emerging, not only as a new tool in early drug discovery but also as potential therapeutics to treat disease. In this review, we assess leading 3D cell culture technologies and their impact on drug discovery, including spheroids, organoids, scaffolds, hydrogels, organs-on-chips, and 3D bioprinting. We also discuss the implementation of these technologies in compound identification, screening, and development, ranging from disease modeling to assessment of efficacy and safety profiles...
March 1, 2017: SLAS Discov
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28289247/three-dimensional-bioprinting-strategies-for-tissue-engineering
#5
Yu Shrike Zhang, Rahmi Oklu, Mehmet Remzi Dokmeci, Ali Khademhosseini
Over the past decades, many approaches have been developed to fabricate biomimetic extracellular matrices of desired properties for engineering functional tissues. However, the inability of these techniques to precisely control the spatial architecture has posed a significant challenge in producing complex tissues. 3D bioprinting technology has emerged as a potential solution by bringing unprecedented freedom and versatility in depositing biological materials and cells in a well-controlled manner in the 3D volumes, therefore achieving precision engineering of functional tissues...
March 13, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28280669/in-vivo-chondrogenesis-in-3d-bioprinted-human-cell-laden-hydrogel-constructs
#6
Thomas Möller, Matteo Amoroso, Daniel Hägg, Camilla Brantsing, Nicole Rotter, Peter Apelgren, Anders Lindahl, Lars Kölby, Paul Gatenholm
BACKGROUND: The three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology allows creation of 3D constructs in a layer-by-layer fashion utilizing biologically relevant materials such as biopolymers and cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of 3D bioprinting in a clinically relevant setting to evaluate the potential of this technique for in vivo chondrogenesis. METHODS: Thirty-six nude mice (Balb-C, female) received a 5- × 5- × 1-mm piece of bioprinted cell-laden nanofibrillated cellulose/alginate construct in a subcutaneous pocket...
February 2017: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Global Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28269205/gelatin-methacrylamide-hydrogel-with-graphene-nanoplatelets-for-neural-cell-laden-3d-bioprinting
#7
Wei Zhu, Brent T Harris, Lijie Grace Zhang
Nervous system is extremely complex which leads to rare regrowth of nerves once injury or disease occurs. Advanced 3D bioprinting strategy, which could simultaneously deposit biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components in a layer-by-layer manner, may be a promising solution to address neural damages. Here we presented a printable nano-bioink composed of gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA), neural stem cells, and bioactive graphene nanoplatelets to target nerve tissue regeneration in the assist of stereolithography based 3D bioprinting technique...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259198/the-2016-tedd-annual-meeting-27-october-2016-zhaw-w%C3%A3-denswil
#8
Elsbeth Heinzelmann
The focus of the 2016 TEDD Annual Meeting - the Competence Centre for Tissue Engineering for Drug Development and Substance Testing - was on current segments of the 3D cell culture market, especially scaffold-free and scaffold-based cell culture, as well as bioprinting, and the use of recellularized tissues. Particular emphasis was placed on metabolic tissue engineering, specifically the generation of human brown fat cells from progenitor cells. Let's take a look behind the scenes of the latest developments...
February 22, 2017: Chimia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28255127/-progress-in-application-of-3d-bioprinting-in-cartilage-regeneration-and-reconstruction-for-tissue-engineering
#9
Junlin Liao, Shaohua Wang, Jia Chen, Hongju Xie, Jianda Zhou
Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting provides an advanced technology for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine because of its ability to produce the models or organs with higher precision and more suitable for human body. It has been successfully used to produce a variety of cartilage scaffold materials. In addition, 3D bioprinter can directly to print tissue and organs with live chondrocytes. In conclusion, 3D bioprinting may have broad prospect for cartilage regeneration and reconstruction in tissue engineering...
February 28, 2017: Zhong Nan da Xue Xue Bao. Yi Xue Ban, Journal of Central South University. Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251176/bioprinting-the-cancer-microenvironment
#10
Yu Shrike Zhang, Margaux Duchamp, Rahmi Oklu, Leif W Ellisen, Robert Langer, Ali Khademhosseini
Cancer is intrinsically complex, comprising both heterogeneous cellular compositions and microenvironmental cues. During the various stages of cancer initiation, development, and metastasis, cell-cell interactions (involving vascular and immune cells besides cancerous cells) as well as cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions (e.g., alteration in stiffness and composition of the surrounding matrix) play major roles. Conventional cancer models both two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) present numerous limitations as they lack good vascularization and cannot mimic the complexity of tumors, thereby restricting their use as biomimetic models for applications such as drug screening and fundamental cancer biology studies...
October 10, 2016: ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28227435/gelatin-methacrylamide-hydrogel-with-graphene-nanoplatelets-for-neural-cell-laden-3d-bioprinting
#11
Wei Zhu, Brent T Harris, Lijie Grace Zhang, Wei Zhu, Brent T Harris, Lijie Grace Zhang, Wei Zhu, Brent T Harris, Lijie Grace Zhang
Nervous system is extremely complex which leads to rare regrowth of nerves once injury or disease occurs. Advanced 3D bioprinting strategy, which could simultaneously deposit biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components in a layer-by-layer manner, may be a promising solution to address neural damages. Here we presented a printable nano-bioink composed of gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA), neural stem cells, and bioactive graphene nanoplatelets to target nerve tissue regeneration in the assist of stereolithography based 3D bioprinting technique...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223179/biological-aspects-of-axonal-damage-in-glaucoma-a-brief-review
#12
REVIEW
Ernst R Tamm, C Ross Ethier, John E Dowling, Crawford Downs, Mark H Ellisman, Steven Fisher, Brad Fortune, Marcus Fruttiger, Tatjana Jakobs, Geoffrey Lewis, Claire H Mitchell, John Morrison, Sansar C Sharma, Ian Sigal, Michael Sofroniew, Lin Wang, Janey Wiggs, Samuel Wu, Richard H Masland
Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a critical risk factor in glaucoma, and the available evidence derived from experimental studies in primates and rodents strongly indicates that the site of IOP-induced axonal damage in glaucoma is at the optic nerve head (ONH). However, the mechanisms that cause IOP-induced damage at the ONH are far from understood. A possible sequence of events could originate with IOP-induced stress in the ONH connective tissue elements (peripapillary sclera, scleral canal and lamina cribrosa) that leads to an increase in biomechanical strain...
February 20, 2017: Experimental Eye Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192772/direct-3d-bioprinting-of-prevascularized-tissue-constructs-with-complex-microarchitecture
#13
Wei Zhu, Xin Qu, Jie Zhu, Xuanyi Ma, Sherrina Patel, Justin Liu, Pengrui Wang, Cheuk Sun Edwin Lai, Maling Gou, Yang Xu, Kang Zhang, Shaochen Chen
Living tissues rely heavily on vascular networks to transport nutrients, oxygen and metabolic waste. However, there still remains a need for a simple and efficient approach to engineer vascularized tissues. Here, we created prevascularized tissues with complex three-dimensional (3D) microarchitectures using a rapid bioprinting method - microscale continuous optical bioprinting (μCOB). Multiple cell types mimicking the native vascular cell composition were encapsulated directly into hydrogels with precisely controlled distribution without the need of sacrificial materials or perfusion...
April 2017: Biomaterials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187519/development-of-a-novel-alginate-polyvinyl-alcohol-hydroxyapatite-hydrogel-for-3d-bioprinting-bone-tissue-engineered-scaffolds
#14
Stephanie T Bendtsen, Sean P Quinnell, Mei Wei
Three-dimensional printed biomaterials used as personalized tissue substitutes have the ability to promote and enhance regeneration in areas of defected tissue. The challenge with 3D printing for bone tissue engineering remains the selection of a material with optimal rheological properties for printing in addition to biocompatibility and capacity for uniform cell incorporation. Hydrogel biomaterials may provide sufficient printability to allow cell encapsulation and bioprinting of scaffolds with uniform cell distribution...
February 10, 2017: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28185142/print-me-an-organ-ethical-and-regulatory-issues-emerging-from-3d-bioprinting-in-medicine
#15
Frederic Gilbert, Cathal D O'Connell, Tajanka Mladenovska, Susan Dodds
Recent developments of three-dimensional printing of biomaterials (3D bioprinting) in medicine have been portrayed as demonstrating the potential to transform some medical treatments, including providing new responses to organ damage or organ failure. However, beyond the hype and before 3D bioprinted organs are ready to be transplanted into humans, several important ethical concerns and regulatory questions need to be addressed. This article starts by raising general ethical concerns associated with the use of bioprinting in medicine, then it focuses on more particular ethical issues related to experimental testing on humans, and the lack of current international regulatory directives to guide these experiments...
February 9, 2017: Science and Engineering Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28140346/increased-lipid-accumulation-and-adipogenic-gene-expression-of-adipocytes-in-3d-bioprinted-nanocellulose-scaffolds
#16
I Henriksson, P Gatenholm, D A Hägg
Compared to standard 2D culture systems, new methods for 3D cell culture of adipocytes could provide more physiologically accurate data and a deeper understanding of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. By resuspending living cells in a bioink of nanocellulose and hyaluronic acid, we were able to print 3D scaffolds with uniform cell distribution. After one week in culture, cell viability was 95%, and after two weeks the cells displayed a more mature phenotype with larger lipid droplets than standard 2D cultured cells...
February 21, 2017: Biofabrication
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28128224/pyrintegrin-induces-soft-tissue-formation-by-transplanted-or-endogenous-cells
#17
Bhranti S Shah, Mo Chen, Takahiro Suzuki, Mildred Embree, Kimi Kong, Chang H Lee, Ling He, Lusai Xiang, Jeffrey A Ahn, Sheng Ding, Jeremy J Mao
Focal adipose deficiency, such as lipoatrophy, lumpectomy or facial trauma, is a formidable challenge in reconstructive medicine, and yet scarcely investigated in experimental studies. Here, we report that Pyrintegrin (Ptn), a 2,4-disubstituted pyrimidine known to promote embryonic stem cells survival, is robustly adipogenic and induces postnatal adipose tissue formation in vivo of transplanted adipose stem/progenitor cells (ASCs) and recruited endogenous cells. In vitro, Ptn stimulated human adipose tissue derived ASCs to differentiate into lipid-laden adipocytes by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα), with differentiated cells increasingly secreting adiponectin, leptin, glycerol and total triglycerides...
January 27, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28120756/-3d-bioprinting-in-regenerative-medicine-and-tissue-engineering
#18
Jean-Christophe Fricain, Hugo De Olivera, Raphaël Devillard, Jérome Kalisky, Murielle Remy, Virginie Kériquel, Damien Le Nihounen, Agathe Grémare, Vera Guduric, Alexis Plaud, Nicolas L'Heureux, Joëlle Amédée, Sylvain Catros
Additive manufacturing covers a number of fashionable technologies that attract the interest of researchers in biomaterials and tissue engineering. Additive manufacturing applied to regenerative medicine covers two main areas: 3D printing and biofabrication. If 3D printing has penetrated the world of regenerative medicine, bioassembly and bioimprinting are still in their infancy. The objective of this paper is to make a non-exhaustive review of these different complementary aspects of additive manufacturing in restorative and regenerative medicine or for tissue engineering...
January 2017: Médecine Sciences: M/S
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28120511/collagen-heparin-sulfate-scaffolds-fabricated-by-a-3d-bioprinter-improved-mechanical-properties-and-neurological-function-after-spinal-cord-injury-in-rats
#19
Chong Chen, Ming-Liang Zhao, Ren-Kun Zhang, Gang Lu, Chang-Yu Zhao, Feng Fu, Hong-Tao Sun, Sai Zhang, Yue Tu, Xiao-Hong Li
Effective treatments promoting axonal regeneration and functional recovery for spinal cord injury (SCI) are still in the early stages of development. Most approaches have been focused on providing supportive substrates for guiding neurons and overcoming the physical and chemical barriers to healing that arise after SCI. Although collagen has become a promising natural substrate with good compatibility, its low mechanical properties restrict its potential applications. The mechanical properties mainly rely on the composition and pore structure of scaffolds...
January 25, 2017: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28106947/3d-bioprinting-and-its-in-vivo-applications
#20
REVIEW
Nhayoung Hong, Gi-Hoon Yang, JaeHwan Lee, GeunHyung Kim
The purpose of 3D bioprinting technology is to design and create functional 3D tissues or organs in situ for in vivo applications. 3D cell-printing, or additive biomanufacturing, allows the selection of biomaterials and cells (bioink), and the fabrication of cell-laden structures in high resolution. 3D cell-printed structures have also been used for applications such as research models, drug delivery and discovery, and toxicology. Recently, numerous attempts have been made to fabricate tissues and organs by using various 3D printing techniques...
January 20, 2017: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B, Applied Biomaterials
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