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K E Hargan, N Michelutti, K Coleman, C Grooms, J M Blais, L E Kimpe, G Gilchrist, M Mallory, J P Smol
Seabirds that congregate in large numbers during the breeding season concentrate marine-derived nutrients to their terrestrial nesting sites, and these nutrients disperse and enhance production in nearby terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. In the Canadian Arctic, large seabird colonies (>100,000 breeding pairs) nest on cliff faces that drain directly in the ocean, ultimately returning the nutrients back to the marine environment from which they were derived. However, strong winds blowing up cliff faces could transport nutrients up in elevation and onto surrounding terrestrial and aquatic environments...
October 22, 2016: Science of the Total Environment
Claude R Joiris, Karin Boos, Diederik D'Hert, Dominik A Nachtsheim
The at-sea distribution of top predators, seabirds and marine mammals, was determined in the high Arctic pack ice on board the icebreaker RV Polarstern in July to September 2014. In total, 1,620 transect counts were realised, lasting 30 min each. The five most numerous seabird species represented 74% of the total of 15,150 individuals registered: kittiwake Rissa tridactyla, fulmar Fulmarus glacialis, puffin Fratercula arctica, Ross's gull Rhodostethia rosea, and little auk Alle alle. Eight cetacean species were tallied for a total of 330 individuals, mainly white-beaked dolphin Lagenorhynchus albirostris and fin whale Balaenoptera physalus...
2016: Scientifica
Kyle D Custard, Kerri A Pratt, Siyuan Wang, Paul B Shepson
During springtime, unique halogen chemistry involving chlorine and bromine atoms controls the prevalence of volatile organic compounds, ozone, and mercury in the Arctic lower troposphere. In situ measurements of the chlorine monoxide radical (ClO) and its precursor Cl2, along with BrO and Br2, were conducted using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) during the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) near Barrow, Alaska in March 2012. To our knowledge, these data represent the first ClO measurements made using CIMS...
October 21, 2016: Environmental Science & Technology
Grete Mehus, Alf Gunnar Mehus, Sidsel Germeten, Nils Henriksen
INTRODUCTION: Snowmobiling among young people in Scandinavia frequently leads to accidents and injuries. Systematic studies of accidents exist, but few studies have addressed young drivers' experiences. The aim of this article is to reveal how young people experience and interpret accidents, and to outline a prevention strategy. METHODS: Thirty-one girls and 50 boys aged 16-23 years from secondary schools in Northern Norway and on Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, participated in 17 focus groups segregated by gender...
October 2016: Rural and Remote Health
Mincheol Kim, Ji Young Jung, Dominique Laffly, Hye Young Kwon, Yoo Kyung Lee
Primary succession after glacier retreat has been widely studied in plant communities, but bacterial succession is still poorly understood. In particular, few studies of microbial succession have been performed in the Arctic. We investigated the shifts in bacterial community structure and soil physicochemical properties along a successional gradient in a 100-year glacier foreland of the High Arctic. Multivariate analyses revealed that time after glacier retreat played a key role in associated bacterial community structure during succession...
October 17, 2016: FEMS Microbiology Ecology
Nicholas J Lunn, Sabrina Servanty, Eric V Regehr, Sarah J Converse, Evan Richardson, Ian Stirling
Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implementation of multistate capture-recapture models...
July 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Jiao Ren, Xiaoping Wang, Chuanfei Wang, Ping Gong, Xiruo Wang, Tandong Yao
Biomagnification of some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been found in marine and freshwater food chains; however, due to the relatively short food chains in high-altitude alpine lakes, whether trophic transfer would result in the biomagnification of POPs is not clear. The transfer of various POPs, including organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), along the aquatic food chain in Nam Co Lake (4700 m), in the central Tibetan Plateau, was studied. The POPs levels in the water, sediment and biota [plankton, invertebrates and fish (Gymnocypris namensis)] of Nam Co were generally low, with concentrations comparable to those reported for the remote Arctic...
October 14, 2016: Environmental Pollution
Gunilla Malm, Trine B Haugen, Lars Rylander, Aleksander Giwercman
A high sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) is associated with reduced fertility. DFI is influenced by the balance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidants. A circannual variation in melatonin, an antioxidant and free radical scavenger, could thus impact semen quality and fertility. The association between the major melatonin metabolite, urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), and DFI was analyzed in 110 Oslo men (south of the Arctic Circle) and 86  Tromsoe men (north of the Arctic Circle). Two semen analyses, summer and winter, and four urine samples (early/late summer; early/late winter), were analyzed...
October 14, 2016: Asian Journal of Andrology
Magali Lucia, Hallvard Strøm, Paco Bustamante, Geir W Gabrielsen
The ivory gull is a high-Arctic species considered endangered in most parts of its breeding range. Ivory gulls must cope with both the reduction of sea ice cover triggered by climate change and increasing contaminant loads due to changes in global contaminant pathways. The objective of this study was to assess the concentration of 14 essential and nonessential trace elements at four colonies of ivory gulls breeding on Barentsøya, Svalbard, and the relationship between contaminant exposure and the diet of individuals...
October 15, 2016: Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Birgit M Braune, Mark L Mallory
Polychorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) such as the non-ortho PCBs (nPCBs) persist in the environment despite international measures to ban their emissions. We determined congener patterns and temporal trends for PCDDs, PCDFs, nPCBs as well as their toxic equivalents (TEQs) in eggs of thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) and northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) sampled from Prince Leopold Island in the Canadian Arctic between 1975 and 2014...
October 11, 2016: Environmental Pollution
Benjamin H Kaffenberger, David Shetlar, Scott Norton, Misha Rosenbach
Global temperatures continue to rise, reaching new records almost every year this decade. Although the causes are debated, climate change is a reality. Consequences of climate change include melting of the arctic ice cap, rising of sea levels, changes in precipitation patterns, and increased severe weather events. This article updates dermatologists about the effects of climate change on the epidemiology and geographic ranges of selected skin diseases in North America. Although globalization, travel, and trade are also important to changing disease and vector patterns, climate change creates favorable habitats and expanded access to immunologically naïve hosts...
October 11, 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
J A Kuhn, R Knudsen, R Kristoffersen, P-A Amundsen
Some fish parasites constitute severe management problems as they may cause mortality of their fish host or are important zoonoses of humans. Parasite assessments are therefore critical to keep track of infections. If conventional sampling techniques can be simplified, parasite assessments might be easier to obtain, less time-consuming and more extensive. In this study, we compare the assessed number of Diphyllobothrium spp. cysts (CYST) with the counted number of Diphyllobothrium spp. plerocercoid larvae recovered using a conventional digestive technique (LARV)...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Fish Diseases
Y Chen, Kevin K Lehmann, Y Peng, L M Pratt, J R White, S B Cadieux, B Sherwood Lollar, G Lacrampe-Couloume, T C Onstott
In this study, near-infrared continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy was applied to the measurement of the δ(2)H of methane (CH4). The cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS) system consisted of multiple DFB laser diodes to optimize selection of spectral line pairs. By rapidly switching measurements between spectral line peaks and the baseline regions, the long-term instrumental drift was minimized, substantially increasing measurement precision. The CRDS system coupled with a cryogenic pre-concentrator measured the δ(2)H of terrestrial atmospheric CH4 from 3 standard liters of air with a precision of ±1...
October 2016: Astrobiology
Dolores E Hill, Jitender P Dubey
Foodborne infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and foodborne parasitic diseases, though not as widespread as bacterial and viral infections, are common on all continents and in most ecosystems, including arctic, temperate, and tropical regions. Outbreaks of disease resulting from foodstuffs contaminated by parasitic protozoa have become increasingly recognized as a problem in the United States and globally. Increased international trade in food products has made movement of these organisms across national boundaries more frequent, and the risks associated with infections have become apparent in nations with well-developed food safety apparatus in place...
August 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Spyridon Ntougias, Żaneta Polkowska, Sofia Nikolaki, Eva Dionyssopoulou, Panagiota Stathopoulou, Vangelis Doudoumis, Marek Ruman, Katarzyna Kozak, Jacek Namieśnik, George Tsiamis
Two thirds of Svalbard archipelago islands in the High Arctic are permanently covered with glacial ice and snow. Polar bacterial communities in the southern part of Svalbard were characterized using an amplicon sequencing approach. A total of 52,928 pyrosequencing reads were analyzed in order to reveal bacterial community structures in stream and lake surface water samples from the Fuglebekken and Revvatnet basins of southern Svalbard. Depending on the samples examined, bacterial communities at a higher taxonomic level mainly consisted either of Bacteroidetes, Betaproteobacteria, and Microgenomates (OP11) or Planctomycetes, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes members, whereas a population of Microgenomates was prominent in 2 samples...
September 30, 2016: Microbes and Environments
Marlene Z Bloom
It was four months in Alaska, in the middle of winter, that changed Joseph Marek's view of what it means to be a pharmacist. Marek was on his last rotation in pharmacy school when he experienced the kind of practice that he wanted for himself. He found that kind of practice as a consultant pharmacist, and next month, Marek, 49, will become the 2016-2017 president of the American Society of Consulting Pharmacists. Working at the Public Health Service (PHS) in the Arctic Circle in 1990, he dispensed and carried out clinical duties with the chief pharmacist and provided care to the native Inuit population through the Indian Health Service...
2016: Consultant Pharmacist: the Journal of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists
Morgan Lizabeth Bender, Marianne Frantzen, Ireen Vieweg, Inger-Britt Falk-Petersen, Helge Kreutzer Johnsen, Geir Rudolfsen, Knut Erik Tollefsen, Paul Dubourg, Jasmine Nahrgang
Increasing human activities in the Arctic raise the risk of petroleum pollution, thus posing an elevated risk for Arctic organisms to be chronically exposed to petroleum compounds. The endocrine disrupting properties of some of these compounds (i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs]) present in crude oil may have negative effects on the long and energy intensive reproductive development of polar cod (Boreogadus saida), an Arctic keystone species. In the present study, selected reproductive parameters were examined in feral polar cod exposed to crude oil via a natural diet (0...
October 4, 2016: Aquatic Toxicology
Mindy L Richlen, Oliver Zielinski, Lars Holinde, Urban Tillmann, Allan Cembella, Yihua Lyu, Donald M Anderson
The bloom-forming dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense has been extensively studied due its toxin-producing capabilities and consequent impacts to human health and economies. This study investigated the prevalence of resting cysts of A. fundyense in western Greenland and Iceland to assess the historical presence and magnitude of bloom populations in the region, and to characterize environmental conditions during summer, when bloom development may occur. Analysis of sediments collected from these locations showed that Alexandrium cysts were present at low to moderate densities in most areas surveyed, with highest densities observed in western Iceland...
2016: Marine Ecology Progress Series
Liliya V Vasileva, Damianka P Getova, Nina D Doncheva, Andrey S Marchev, Milen I Georgiev
: Rhodiola rosea L., family Crassulaceae also known as Golden Root or Arctic root is one of the most widely used medicinal plants with effect on cognitive dysfunction, psychological stress and depression. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a standardized commercial Rhodiola extract on learning and memory processes in naive rats as well as its effects in rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty male Wistar rats were used in the study...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
C Verde, D Giordano, C M Bellas, G di Prisco, A M Anesio
The large diversity of marine microorganisms harboured by oceans plays an important role in planet sustainability by driving globally important biogeochemical cycles; all primary and most secondary production in the oceans is performed by microorganisms. The largest part of the planet is covered by cold environments; consequently, cold-adapted microorganisms have crucial functional roles in globally important environmental processes and biogeochemical cycles cold-adapted extremophiles are a remarkable model to shed light on the molecular basis of survival at low temperature...
2016: Advances in Microbial Physiology
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