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Atypical HUS

Serkan Yıldız, Fatih Demirkan
Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) are disorders characterized by endothelial cell activation, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and organ failure of variable intensity. The pathophysiology of various types of TMAs have become an interesting field of study. Alternative complement system activation plays an important role in several pathophysiological conditions. Complement activation is also described in an increasing number of TMAs. Inherited defects in complement regulatory genes and acquired autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins have been described...
February 21, 2018: Transfusion and Apheresis Science
Ratna Basak, Xiaotong Wang, Caitlin Keane, Robert Woroniecki
A 17-year-old girl presented with fever, myalgia, vomiting for 1 month and oliguria and dyspnoea for 4 days. She was tachycardic,hypertensive, with pedal oedema and decreased breath sounds. She had high serum creatinine (3 mg/dL), anaemia, thrombocytopenia, leucocytosis and eosinophilia with schistocytes. Lactate dehydrogenase, transaminases were high , with low haptoglobin and high ferritin (5269 ng/mL). Complement C3/C4 and fibrinogen were normal. Urinalysis showed large blood and protein and stool studies were negative...
February 11, 2018: BMJ Case Reports
Lucy Fox, Solomon J Cohney, Joshua Y Kausman, Jake Shortt, Peter D Hughes, Erica M Wood, Nicole M Isbel, Theo de Malmanche, Anne Durkan, Pravin Hissaria, Piers Blombery, Thomas D Barbour
Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) arises in a variety of clinical circumstances with the potential to cause significant dysfunction of the kidneys, brain, gastrointestinal tract and heart. TMA should be considered in all patients with thrombocytopenia and anaemia, with an immediate request to the haematology laboratory to look for red cell fragments on a blood film. Whilst TMA of any aetiology generally demands prompt treatment, this is especially so in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS), where organ failure may be precipitous, irreversible and fatal...
February 8, 2018: Nephrology
Anwesha A Mukherjee, Amit D Kandhare, Subhash L Bodhankar
BACKGROUND: Hemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is progressive renal failure disease and determination of their quality of life (QoL) on the basis of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are becoming increasingly important in the economic evaluations for its treatment with eculizumab (ECU). AIM: To perform the systematic evaluation of QoL in HUS patients treated with ECU on the basis of Evaluating Measures of Patient Reported Outcomes (EMPRO) tool. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Google Scholar till September 2016 by two independent researchers...
November 2018: Renal Failure
Johanna A Kremer Hovinga, Silvan R Heeb, Magdalena Skowronska, Monica Schaller
Thrombotic microangiopathies are rare disorders characterized by the concomitant occurrence of severe thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and a variable degree of ischemic end organ damage. The latter particularly affects the brain, the heart and the kidneys. The primary forms, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), although in their clinical presentation often overlapping, have distinctive pathophysiologies. TTP is the consequence of a severe ADAMTS13 deficiency, immune-mediated due to circulating autoantibodies (iTTP), or caused by mutations in the ADAMTS13 gene (cTTP)...
January 22, 2018: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis: JTH
Akira Ashida, Hideki Matsumura, Toshihiro Sawai, Rika Fujimaru, Yuko Fujii, Akihiko Shirasu, Hyogo Nakakura, Kazumoto Iijima
BACKGROUND: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) includes hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). This study examined the epidemiological characteristics of pediatric patients with TMA classified according to etiology. METHODS: The survey evaluated 258 Japanese pediatric patients diagnosed with TMA between 2012 and 2015. RESULTS: The primary diseases responsible for TMA were categorized as TTP (15 cases), Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli-associated HUS (STEC-HUS) (166 cases), atypical HUS (aHUS) (40 cases), and secondary TMA (27 cases)...
January 19, 2018: Clinical and Experimental Nephrology
Martina Gaggl, Christof Aigner, Dorottya Csuka, Ágnes Szilágyi, Zoltán Prohászka, Renate Kain, Natalja Haninger, Maarten Knechtelsdorfer, Raute Sunder-Plassmann, Gere Sunder-Plassmann, Alice Schmidt
Atypical HUS (aHUS) is a disorder most commonly caused by inherited defects of the alternative pathway of complement, or the proteins that regulate this pathway, and life-threatening episodes of aHUS can be provoked by pregnancy. We retrospectively and prospectively investigated 27 maternal and fetal pregnancy outcomes in 14 women with aHUS from the Vienna Thrombotic Microangiopathy Cohort. Seven pregnancies (26%) were complicated by pregnancy-associated aHUS (p-aHUS), of which three appeared to be provoked by infection, bleeding, and curettage, and three individuals were considered to have preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome before the definitive diagnosis of p-aHUS was made...
December 27, 2017: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: JASN
Vinod Krishnappa, Mohit Gupta, Mohamed Elrifai, Bahar Moftakhar, Michael J Ensley, Tushar J Vachharajani, Sidharth Kumar Sethi, Rupesh Raina
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) affecting multiple organ systems. Recently, aHUS has been shown to be associated with uncontrolled complement activation due to mutations in the alternative pathway of complement components paving the way for targeted drug therapy. By meta-analysis of case reports, we discuss the impact of new treatment strategies on the resolution time of aHUS symptoms and mortality, and the distribution of genetic mutations...
December 17, 2017: Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis
Lambertus van den Heuvel, Kristian Riesbeck, Omaima El Tahir, Valentina Gracchi, Mariann Kremlitzka, Servaas A Morré, A Marceline van Furth, Birendra Singh, Marcin Okrój, Nicole van de Kar, Anna M Blom, Elena Volokhina
Most cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) are caused by infection with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Genetic defects causing uncontrolled complement activation are associated with the more severe atypical HUS (aHUS). Non-EHEC infections can trigger the disease, however, complement defects predisposing to such infections have not yet been studied. We describe a 2-month-old patient infected with different Gram-negative bacterial species resulting in aHUS. Serum analysis revealed slow complement activation kinetics...
January 2018: Journal of Human Genetics
M Rizwan, K E Maduemem
Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. The atypical HUS (aHUS) results from over activation of complement system with formation of micro thrombi and damage to endothelial cells resulting in renal impairment in 50 % and death in 25 %, commonly in untreated patients. We report an intriguing case of aHUS presenting with acute onset of movement disorder and fluctuating delirium.
August 12, 2017: Irish Medical Journal
Malia Rasa, James Musgrave, Keith Abe, Len Tanaka, Konstantine Xoinis, Bruce Shiramizu, Gretchen Foskett, Rhiana Lau
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can be classified as typical and atypical, and the treatment recommendations currently differ between the 2 types. Eculizumab is recommended as first-line treatment for atypical HUS; however, its use in typical HUS has been controversial. We report a case of a 10-year-old male with severe neurologic impairment who was successfully treated with eculizumab, which was started 4 days after onset of neurologic symptoms. Our case supports the use of eculizumab in typical HUS with neurologic involvement, even when given later in the course, as the pathophysiology of typical HUS has been shown to involve activation of the complement pathway, similar to atypical HUS...
October 2017: Journal of Investigative Medicine High Impact Case Reports
Magdalena Riedl, Damien G Noone, Meraj A Khan, Fred G Pluthero, Walter H A Kahr, Nades Palaniyar, Christoph Licht
Introduction: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a thrombotic microangiopathy, which is linked to hereditary or autoimmune defects in complement activators or regulators present in blood and on vascular endothelial cells. Acute thrombotic microangiopathy episodes are typically preceded by infections, which by themselves would not be expected to manifest HUS. Thus, it is possible that the host immune response contributes to the precipitation of aHUS. However, the mechanisms involved are not fully understood...
January 2017: KI Reports
C Rafat, P Coppo, F Fakhouri, V Frémeaux-Bacchi, C Loirat, J Zuber, E Rondeau
Major achievements in the understanding of thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) have not only resulted in a reclassification of TMA but most of all they have culminated in the design of new treatments and have enabled clinicians to better delineate their prognosis. Recent multicenter studies have improved our understanding of the prognosis of atypical hemolytic and uremic syndromes (aHUS). More specifically, they have highlighted the role of genetic testing on predicting the recurrence of aHUS, the risk of chronic kidney disease and the recurrence following kidney transplantation...
December 2017: La Revue de Médecine Interne
R W Thergaonkar, Ankita Narang, Bahadur Singh Gurjar, Pradeep Tiwari, Mamta Puraswani, Himanshi Saini, Aditi Sinha, Binuja Varma, Mitali Mukerji, Pankaj Hari, Arvind Bagga
BACKGROUND: Genetic susceptibility to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) may lie within genes regulating or activating the alternate complement and related pathways converging on endothelial cell activation. METHODS: We tested 32 Indian patients of aHUS negative for antibodies to complement factor H for genetic variations in a panel of 15 genes, i.e., CFH, CFHR1-5, CFI, CFB, C3, CD46, MASP2, DGKE, ADAMTS13, THBD and PLG using next-generation DNA sequencing and for copy number variation in CFHR1-3...
September 22, 2017: Clinical and Experimental Nephrology
Patrick R Walsh, Sally Johnson
Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), comprising microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopaenia and acute kidney injury, remains the leading cause of paediatric intrinsic acute kidney injury, with peak incidence in children aged under 5 years. HUS most commonly occurs following infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC-HUS). Additionally, HUS can occur as a result of inherited or acquired dysregulation of the alternative complement cascade (atypical HUS or aHUS) and in the setting of invasive pneumococcal infection...
September 12, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood
Gianluigi Ardissino, Michela Perrone, Francesca Tel, Sara Testa, Amelia Morrone, Ilaria Possenti, Francesco Tagliaferri, Robertino Dilena, Francesca Menni
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an unrare and severe thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) caused by several pathogenetic mechanisms among which Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections and complement dysregulation are the most common. However, very rarely and particularly in neonates and infants, disorders of cobalamin metabolism (CblC) can present with or be complicated by TMA. Herein we describe a case of atypical HUS (aHUS) related to CblC disease which first presented in a previously healthy boy at age of 13...
2017: Case Reports in Pediatrics
Joel L Moake
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 20, 2017: Blood
Joseph L Alge, Scott E Wenderfer, John Hicks, Mir Reza Bekheirnia, Deborah A Schady, Jamey S Kain, Michael C Braun
BACKGROUND: Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can occur as a primary process due to mutations in complement genes or secondary to another underlying disease. HUS sometimes occurs in the setting of glomerular diseases, and it has been described in association with Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS), which is characterized by the triad of abnormal genitourinary development; a pathognomonic glomerulopathy, diffuse mesangial sclerosis; and the development of Wilms tumor. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 46, XX female infant who presented with HUS and biopsy-proven thrombotic microangiopathy...
July 18, 2017: BMC Nephrology
Belinda Jim, Vesna D Garovic
Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury (AKI) has declined in incidence in the last three decades, although it remains an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy-related causes of AKI such as preeclampsia, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver function tests, Low Platelets) syndrome, and the thrombotic microangiopathies (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome [HUS]) exhibit overlapping features and often present as diagnostic dilemmas...
July 2017: Seminars in Nephrology
Luca Visconti, Valeria Cernaro, Gianluigi Ardissino, Martina Sgarbanti, Domenico Ferrara, Giuseppe Visconti, Domenico Santoro, Michele Buemi
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolysis, platelet consumption and multiple organ failure with predominant renal involvement. In the most of cases (85-90%), it is associated with enteric infection due to Shiga-toxin or verocytotoxin (STEC-VTEC)-producer Escherichia coli. Rarely, in about 10-15% of cases, HUS develops in the presence of a disorder of alternative complement pathway regulation and it is defined atypical (aHUS). We describe the case of a 65-year-old man who came to our attention with a clinical presentation of aHUS and a clinical course characterized by rapidly progressive acute renal failure (ARF), which required renal replacement treatments, and by a stable clinical picture of hematological impairment as a marker of a non-severe and self-limiting form...
April 2017: Giornale Italiano di Nefrologia: Organo Ufficiale Della Società Italiana di Nefrologia
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