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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28737483/tissue-lesions-due-to-spirorchiid-eggs-in-a-loggerhead-turtle-caretta-caretta-linnaeus-1758-from-brazil-the-first-report-outside-of-the-usa
#1
Rachel Bittencourt Ribeiro, Hassan Jerdy, Raphael Mansur Medina, Mariah Bianchi, Max Werneck, Eulógio Carvalho
Spirorchiids (family Spirorchiidae Stunkard 1921) are a group of flukes that inhabit the circulatory system of turtles. Infection by members of the family Spirorchiidae involves egg deposition in the host blood stream, accumulation in tissues, which cause inflammatory reactions and embolisms, leading or contributing to the death of the host. Reports of Spirorchiids eggs lesions on loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta Linnaeus, 1758) were observed only in the USA hosts. In the present report a female loggerhead sea turtle was found dead on the beach in north State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil...
July 24, 2017: Journal of Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28719870/effects-of-endocrine-disrupting-chemicals-on-estrogen-receptor-alpha-and-heat-shock-protein-60-gene-expression-in-primary-cultures-of-loggerhead-sea-turtle-caretta-caretta-erythrocytes
#2
Paolo Cocci, Martina Capriotti, Gilberto Mosconi, Francesco Alessandro Palermo
The loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) can be considered a good indicator species for studying the ecological impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on wildlife. However, the effect of these environmental pollutants on nuclear steroid hormone signaling has not yet been addressed in sea turtles mainly due to the legal constraints of their endangered status. Here we describe the use of primary erythrocyte cell cultures as in vitro models for evaluating the effects of different EDCs on the expression of estrogen receptor α (ERα)...
July 15, 2017: Environmental Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28714301/assessing-fukushima-derived-radiocesium-in-migratory-pacific-predators
#3
Daniel James Madigan, Zofia Baumann, Owyn E Snodgrass, Heidi Dewar, Michelle Berman-Kowalewski, Kevin C Weng, Jun Nishikawa, Peter H Dutton, Nicholas S Fisher
The 2011 release of Fukushima-derived radionuclides into the Pacific Ocean made migratory sharks, teleosts, and marine mammals a source of speculation and anxiety regarding radiocesium (134+137Cs) contamination, despite a lack of actual radiocesium measurements for these taxa. We measured radiocesium in a diverse suite of large predators from the North Pacific Ocean and report no detectable (i.e., ≥ 0.1 Bq kg-1 dry wt) of Fukushima-derived 134Cs in all samples, except in one olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) with trace levels (0...
July 17, 2017: Environmental Science & Technology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28693110/potential-effects-of-brevetoxins-and-toxic-elements-on-various-health-variables-in-kemp-s-ridley-lepidochelys-kempii-and-green-chelonia-mydas-sea-turtles-after-a-red-tide-bloom-event
#4
Justin R Perrault, Nicole I Stacy, Andreas F Lehner, Cody R Mott, Sarah Hirsch, Jonathan C Gorham, John P Buchweitz, Michael J Bresette, Catherine J Walsh
Natural biotoxins and anthropogenic toxicants pose a significant risk to sea turtle health. Documented effects of contaminants include potential disease progression and adverse impacts on development, immune function, and survival in these imperiled species. The shallow seagrass habitats of Florida's northwest coast (Big Bend) serve as an important developmental habitat for Kemp's ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) and green (Chelonia mydas) sea turtles; however, few studies have been conducted in this area. Our objectives were (1) to evaluate plasma analytes (mass, minimum straight carapace length, body condition index [BCI], fibropapilloma tumor score, lysozyme, superoxide dismutase, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, plasma protein electrophoresis, cholesterol, and total solids) in Kemp's ridleys and green turtles and their correlation to brevetoxins that were released from a red tide bloom event from July-October 2014 in the Gulf of Mexico near Florida's Big Bend, and (2) to analyze red blood cells in Kemp's ridleys and green turtles for toxic elements (arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, selenium, thallium) with correlation to the measured plasma analytes...
July 6, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28688307/the-current-situation-of-inorganic-elements-in-marine-turtles-a-general-review-and-meta-analysis
#5
REVIEW
Adriana A Cortés-Gómez, Diego Romero, Marc Girondot
Inorganic elements (Pb, Cd, Hg, Al, As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se and Zn) are present globally in aquatic systems and their potential transfer to marine turtles can be a serious threat to their health status. The environmental fate of these contaminants may be traced by the analysis of turtle tissues. Loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) are the most frequently investigated of all the sea turtle species with regards to inorganic elements, followed by Green turtles (Chelonia mydas); all the other species have considerably fewer studies...
July 5, 2017: Environmental Pollution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28674666/who-are-the-important-predators-of-sea-turtle-nests-at-wreck-rock-beach
#6
Juan Lei, David T Booth
Excessive sea turtle nest predation is a problem for conservation management of sea turtle populations. This study assessed predation on nests of the endangered loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) at Wreck Rock beach adjacent to Deepwater National Park in Southeast Queensland, Australia after a control program for feral foxes was instigated. The presence of predators on the nesting dune was evaluated by tracking plots (2 × 1 m) every 100 m along the dune front. There were 21 (2014-2015) and 41 (2015-2016) plots established along the dune, and these were monitored for predator tracks daily over three consecutive months in both nesting seasons...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28674653/the-comparative-osteology-of-plesiochelys-bigleri-n-sp-a-new-coastal-marine-turtle-from-the-late-jurassic-of-porrentruy-switzerland
#7
Christian Püntener, Jérémy Anquetin, Jean-Paul Billon-Bruyat
BACKGROUND: During the Late Jurassic, several groups of eucryptodiran turtles inhabited the shallow epicontinental seas of Western Europe. Plesiochelyidae are an important part of this first radiation of crown-group turtles into coastal marine ecosystems. Fossils of Plesiochelyidae occur in many European localities, and are especially abundant in the Kimmeridgian layers of the Swiss Jura Mountains (Solothurn and Porrentruy). In the mid-19th century, the quarries of Solothurn (NW Switzerland) already provided a large amount of fossil turtles, most notably Plesiochelys etalloni, the best-known plesiochelyid species...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28667257/long-distance-biotic-dispersal-of-tropical-seagrass-seeds-by-marine-mega-herbivores
#8
Samantha J Tol, Jessie C Jarvis, Paul H York, Alana Grech, Bradley C Congdon, Robert G Coles
Terrestrial plants use an array of animals as vectors for dispersal, however little is known of biotic dispersal of marine angiosperms such as seagrasses. Our study in the Great Barrier Reef confirms for the first time that dugongs (Dugong dugon) and green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) assist seagrass dispersal. We demonstrate that these marine mega-herbivores consume and pass in faecal matter viable seeds for at least three seagrass species (Zostera muelleri, Halodule uninervis and Halophila decipiens). One to two seagrass seeds per g DW of faecal matter were found during the peak of the seagrass reproductive season (September to December), with viability on excretion of 9...
June 30, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28660347/bioinspired-magnetic-reception-and-multimodal-sensing
#9
Brian K Taylor
Several animals use Earth's magnetic field in concert with other sensor modes to accomplish navigational tasks ranging from local homing to continental scale migration. However, despite extensive research, animal magnetic reception remains poorly understood. Similarly, the Earth's magnetic field offers a signal that engineered systems can leverage to navigate in environments where man-made positioning systems such as GPS are either unavailable or unreliable. This work uses a behavioral strategy inspired by the migratory behavior of sea turtles to locate a magnetic goal and respond to wind when it is present...
August 2017: Biological Cybernetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28653410/breeding-density-fine-scale-tracking-and-large-scale-modeling-reveal-the-regional-distribution-of-four-seabird-species
#10
Ewan D Wakefield, Ellie Owen, Julia Baer, Matthew J Carroll, Francis Daunt, Stephen G Dodd, Jonathan A Green, Tim Guilford, Roddy A Mavor, Peter I Miller, Mark A Newell, Stephen F Newton, Gail S Robertson, Akiko Shoji, Louise M Soanes, Stephen C Votier, Sarah Wanless, Mark Bolton
Population-level estimates of species' distributions can reveal fundamental ecological processes and facilitate conservation. However, these may be difficult to obtain for mobile species, especially colonial central-place foragers (CCPFs; e.g. bats, corvids, social insects), because it is often impractical to determine the provenance of individuals observed beyond breeding sites. Moreover, some CCPFs, especially in the marine realm (e.g. pinnipeds, turtles and seabirds) are difficult to observe because they range 10s to 10,000s km from their colonies...
June 27, 2017: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28651091/loggerhead-sea-turtles-caretta-caretta-a-target-species-for-monitoring-litter-ingested-by-marine-organisms-in-the-mediterranean-sea
#11
Marco Matiddi, Sandra Hochsheid, Andrea Camedda, Matteo Baini, Cristiano Cocumelli, Fabrizio Serena, Paolo Tomassetti, Andrea Travaglini, Stefano Marra, Tommaso Campani, Francesco Scholl, Cecilia Mancusi, Ezio Amato, Paolo Briguglio, Fulvio Maffucci, Maria Cristina Fossi, Flegra Bentivegna, Giuseppe Andrea de Lucia
Marine litter is any persistent, manufactured or processed solid material discarded, disposed of or abandoned in the marine and coastal environment. Ingestion of marine litter can have lethal and sub-lethal effects on wildlife that accidentally ingests it, and sea turtles are particularly susceptible to this threat. The European Commission drafted the 2008/56/EC Marine Strategy Framework Directive with the aim to achieve a Good Environmental Status (GES), and the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta, Linnaeus 1758) was selected for monitoring the amount and composition of litter ingested by marine animals...
June 23, 2017: Environmental Pollution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649496/de-novo-transcriptome-assembly-of-loggerhead-sea-turtle-nesting-of-the-colombian-caribbean
#12
Javier Hernández-Fernández, Andrés Pinzón, Leonardo Mariño-Ramírez
Loggerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta is widely distributed in the oceans of tropical and subtropical latitude. This turtle is an endangered species due to anthropic and natural factors that have decreased their population levels. In this study, RNA sequencing and de-novo assembly of genes expressed in blood were performed. The raw FASTQ files have been deposited on NCBI's SRA database with accession number SRX2629512. A total of 5.4 Gb raw sequence data were obtained, corresponding to 48,257,019 raw reads...
September 2017: Genomics Data
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28642099/developmental-cardiovascular-physiology-of-the-olive-ridley-sea-turtle-lepidochelys-olivacea
#13
Dane Alan Crossley, Janna Lee Crossley, Camilla Smith, Martha Harfush, Hermilo Sánchez-Sánchez, Mónica Vanessa Garduño-Paz, José Fernando Méndez-Sánchez
Our understanding of reptilian cardiovascular development and regulation has increased substantially for two species the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) during the past two decades. However, what we know about cardiovascular maturation in many other species remains poorly understood or unknown. Embryonic sea turtles have been studied to understand the maturation of metabolic function, but these studies have not addressed the cardiovascular system...
June 19, 2017: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28631031/metals-in-blood-and-eggs-of-green-sea-turtles-chelonia-mydas-from-nesting-colonies-of-the-northern-coast-of-the-sea-of-oman
#14
Mahmood Sinaei, Mehdi Bolouki
The green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) has been a species of global concern for decades. In this study, heavy metals (mercury: Hg; Cadmium: Cd; Lead: Pb; Copper: Cu; and Zinc: Zn) were measured in blood and three egg fraction of green sea turtles nesting on the northern coast of Sea of Oman. Heavy metals concentrations in blood, yolk, albumen, and egg shell ranged between 0.16-36.78, 0.006-33.88, 0.003-4.02, and 0.002-6.85 μg/g (ww), respectively. According to the results, all heavy metals found in blood samples (n = 12) also were detected in the various parts of the eggs (n = 48)...
June 19, 2017: Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28627488/diversity-of-veronaea-botryosa-from-different-hosts-and-evaluation-of-laboratory-challenge-models-for-phaeohyphomycosis-in-acipenser-transmontanus
#15
Esteban Soto, Christine Richey, Stephen R Reichley, Brittany Stevens, Kirsten V Kenelty, Janiee Lewis, Barbara Byrne, Nathan P Wiederhold, Thomas B Waltzek, Matthew F Sheley, Alvin C Camus, Matt J Griffin
Veronaea botryosa has been identified as a pathogen of cultured white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus. In 2015, samples from 19 white sturgeon were received for diagnosis, of which 14 cultured positive for V. botryosa. Intraspecific variability among V. botryosa isolates from different clinically affected hosts and geographic regions was investigated using repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR fingerprinting (rep-PCR). The rep-PCR profiles of 16 V. botryosa isolates from a human, sea turtles, and cultured fish were distinct from those of other phaeoid fungi belonging to the genera Cladophialophora and Exophiala...
June 19, 2017: Diseases of Aquatic Organisms
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621028/climate-change-and-temperature-linked-hatchling-mortality-at-a-globally-important-sea-turtle-nesting-site
#16
Jacques-Olivier Laloë, Jacquie Cozens, Berta Renom, Albert Taxonera, Graeme C Hays
The study of temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) in vertebrates has attracted major scientific interest. Recently, concerns for species with TSD in a warming world have increased because imbalanced sex ratios could potentially threaten population viability. In contrast, relatively little attention has been given to the direct effects of increased temperatures on successful embryonic development. Using 6603 days of sand temperature data recorded across 6 years at a globally important loggerhead sea turtle rookery-the Cape Verde Islands-we show the effects of warming incubation temperatures on the survival of hatchlings in nests...
June 16, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28606614/plastic-ingestion-in-oceanic-stage-loggerhead-sea-turtles-caretta-caretta-off-the-north-atlantic-subtropical-gyre
#17
Christopher K Pham, Yasmina Rodríguez, Axelle Dauphin, Rita Carriço, João P G L Frias, Frederic Vandeperre, Vanessa Otero, Marco R Santos, Helen R Martins, Alan B Bolten, Karen A Bjorndal
Juvenile oceanic-stage sea turtles are particularly vulnerable to the increasing quantity of plastic coming into the oceans. In this study, we analysed the gastrointestinal tracts of 24 juvenile oceanic-stage loggerheads (Caretta caretta) collected off the North Atlantic subtropical gyre, in the Azores region, a key feeding ground for juvenile loggerheads. Twenty individuals were found to have ingested marine debris (83%), composed exclusively of plastic items (primarily polyethylene and polypropylene) identified by μ-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy...
June 9, 2017: Marine Pollution Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601036/light-pollution-affects-nesting-behavior-of-loggerhead-turtles-and-predation-risk-of-nests-and-hatchlings
#18
Elton Silva, Adolfo Marco, Jesemine da Graça, Héctor Pérez, Elena Abella, Juan Patino-Martinez, Samir Martins, Corrine Almeida
The introduction of artificial light into wildlife habitats is a rapidly expanding aspect of global change, which has many negative impacts on a wide range of taxa. In this experimental study, which took place on a beach located on the island of Boa Vista (Cabo Verde), three types of artificial light were tested on nesting loggerhead sea turtles as well as on ghost crabs, which intensively predate on nests and hatchlings, to determine the effects they would produce on the behavior of both species. Over the course of 36days, female loggerheads and ghost crabs were studied under yellow, orange and red lights, with observations also being made on dark nights that served as a control treatment...
June 3, 2017: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577532/parasitic-outbreak-of-the-copepod-balaenophilus-manatorum-in-neonate-loggerhead-sea-turtles-caretta-caretta-from-a-head-starting-program
#19
J L Crespo-Picazo, D García-Parraga, F Domènech, J Tomás, F J Aznar, J Ortega, J M Corpa
BACKGROUND: Diseases associated to external parasitosis are scarcely reported in sea turtles. During the last decades several organism have been documented as a part of normal epibiont community connected to sea turtles. The copepod Balaenophilus manatorum has been cited as a part of epibiont fauna with some concern about its parasitic capacity. This study serves three purposes, i.e. (i) it sheds light on the type of life style that B. manatorum has developed with its hosts, particularly turtles; (ii) it makes a cautionary note of the potential health risks associated with B...
June 2, 2017: BMC Veterinary Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28572687/defining-risk-variables-causing-gas-embolism-in-loggerhead-sea-turtles-caretta-caretta-caught-in-trawls-and-gillnets
#20
Andreas Fahlman, Jose Luis Crespo-Picazo, Blair Sterba-Boatwright, Brian A Stacy, Daniel Garcia-Parraga
Incidental capture, or 'bycatch' in fishing gear is a major global threat to sea turtle populations. A recent study showed that underwater entrapment in fishing gear followed by rapid decompression may cause gas bubble formation within the blood stream (embolism) and tissues leading to organ injury, impairment, and even mortality in some bycaught individuals. We analyzed data from 128 capture events using logistic and ordinal regression to examine risk factors associated with gas embolism in sea turtles captured in trawls and gillnets...
June 1, 2017: Scientific Reports
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