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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28642099/developmental-cardiovascular-physiology-of-the-olive-ridley-sea-turtle-lepidochelys-olivacea
#1
Dane Alan Crossley, Janna Lee Crossley, Camilla Smith, Martha Harfush, Hermilo Sánchez-Sánchez, Mónica Vanessa Garduño-Paz, José Fernando Méndez-Sánchez
Our understanding of reptilian cardiovascular development and regulation has increased substantially for two species the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) during the past two decades. However, what we know about cardiovascular maturation in many other species remains poorly understood or unknown. Embryonic sea turtles have been studied to understand the maturation of metabolic function, but these studies have not addressed the cardiovascular system...
June 19, 2017: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28631031/metals-in-blood-and-eggs-of-green-sea-turtles-chelonia-mydas-from-nesting-colonies-of-the-northern-coast-of-the-sea-of-oman
#2
Mahmood Sinaei, Mehdi Bolouki
The green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) has been a species of global concern for decades. In this study, heavy metals (mercury: Hg; Cadmium: Cd; Lead: Pb; Copper: Cu; and Zinc: Zn) were measured in blood and three egg fraction of green sea turtles nesting on the northern coast of Sea of Oman. Heavy metals concentrations in blood, yolk, albumen, and egg shell ranged between 0.16-36.78, 0.006-33.88, 0.003-4.02, and 0.002-6.85 μg/g (ww), respectively. According to the results, all heavy metals found in blood samples (n = 12) also were detected in the various parts of the eggs (n = 48)...
June 19, 2017: Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28627488/diversity-of-veronaea-botryosa-from-different-hosts-and-evaluation-of-laboratory-challenge-models-for-phaeohyphomycosis-in-acipenser-transmontanus
#3
Esteban Soto, Christine Richey, Stephen R Reichley, Brittany Stevens, Kirsten V Kenelty, Janiee Lewis, Barbara Byrne, Nathan P Wiederhold, Thomas B Waltzek, Matthew F Sheley, Alvin C Camus, Matt J Griffin
Veronaea botryosa has been identified as a pathogen of cultured white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus. In 2015, samples from 19 white sturgeon were received for diagnosis, of which 14 cultured positive for V. botryosa. Intraspecific variability among V. botryosa isolates from different clinically affected hosts and geographic regions was investigated using repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR fingerprinting (rep-PCR). The rep-PCR profiles of 16 V. botryosa isolates from a human, sea turtles, and cultured fish were distinct from those of other phaeoid fungi belonging to the genera Cladophialophora and Exophiala...
June 19, 2017: Diseases of Aquatic Organisms
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621028/climate-change-and-temperature-linked-hatchling-mortality-at-a-globally-important-sea-turtle-nesting-site
#4
Jacques-Olivier Laloë, Jacquie Cozens, Berta Renom, Albert Taxonera, Graeme C Hays
The study of temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) in vertebrates has attracted major scientific interest. Recently, concerns for species with TSD in a warming world have increased because imbalanced sex ratios could potentially threaten population viability. In contrast, relatively little attention has been given to the direct effects of increased temperatures on successful embryonic development. Using 6603 days of sand temperature data recorded across 6 years at a globally important loggerhead sea turtle rookery-the Cape Verde Islands-we show the effects of warming incubation temperatures on the survival of hatchlings in nests...
June 16, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28606614/plastic-ingestion-in-oceanic-stage-loggerhead-sea-turtles-caretta-caretta-off-the-north-atlantic-subtropical-gyre
#5
Christopher K Pham, Yasmina Rodríguez, Axelle Dauphin, Rita Carriço, João P G L Frias, Frederic Vandeperre, Vanessa Otero, Marco R Santos, Helen R Martins, Alan B Bolten, Karen A Bjorndal
Juvenile oceanic-stage sea turtles are particularly vulnerable to the increasing quantity of plastic coming into the oceans. In this study, we analysed the gastrointestinal tracts of 24 juvenile oceanic-stage loggerheads (Caretta caretta) collected off the North Atlantic subtropical gyre, in the Azores region, a key feeding ground for juvenile loggerheads. Twenty individuals were found to have ingested marine debris (83%), composed exclusively of plastic items (primarily polyethylene and polypropylene) identified by μ-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy...
June 9, 2017: Marine Pollution Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601036/light-pollution-affects-nesting-behavior-of-loggerhead-turtles-and-predation-risk-of-nests-and-hatchlings
#6
Elton Silva, Adolfo Marco, Jesemine da Graça, Héctor Pérez, Elena Abella, Juan Patino-Martinez, Samir Martins, Corrine Almeida
The introduction of artificial light into wildlife habitats is a rapidly expanding aspect of global change, which has many negative impacts on a wide range of taxa. In this experimental study, which took place on a beach located on the island of Boa Vista (Cabo Verde), three types of artificial light were tested on nesting loggerhead sea turtles as well as on ghost crabs, which intensively predate on nests and hatchlings, to determine the effects they would produce on the behavior of both species. Over the course of 36days, female loggerheads and ghost crabs were studied under yellow, orange and red lights, with observations also being made on dark nights that served as a control treatment...
June 3, 2017: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577532/parasitic-outbreak-of-the-copepod-balaenophilus-manatorum-in-neonate-loggerhead-sea-turtles-caretta-caretta-from-a-head-starting-program
#7
J L Crespo-Picazo, D García-Parraga, F Domènech, J Tomás, F J Aznar, J Ortega, J M Corpa
BACKGROUND: Diseases associated to external parasitosis are scarcely reported in sea turtles. During the last decades several organism have been documented as a part of normal epibiont community connected to sea turtles. The copepod Balaenophilus manatorum has been cited as a part of epibiont fauna with some concern about its parasitic capacity. This study serves three purposes, i.e. (i) it sheds light on the type of life style that B. manatorum has developed with its hosts, particularly turtles; (ii) it makes a cautionary note of the potential health risks associated with B...
June 2, 2017: BMC Veterinary Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28572687/defining-risk-variables-causing-gas-embolism-in-loggerhead-sea-turtles-caretta-caretta-caught-in-trawls-and-gillnets
#8
Andreas Fahlman, Jose Luis Crespo-Picazo, Blair Sterba-Boatwright, Brian A Stacy, Daniel Garcia-Parraga
Incidental capture, or 'bycatch' in fishing gear is a major global threat to sea turtle populations. A recent study showed that underwater entrapment in fishing gear followed by rapid decompression may cause gas bubble formation within the blood stream (embolism) and tissues leading to organ injury, impairment, and even mortality in some bycaught individuals. We analyzed data from 128 capture events using logistic and ordinal regression to examine risk factors associated with gas embolism in sea turtles captured in trawls and gillnets...
June 1, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28552352/calcium-isotopic-evidence-for-vulnerable-marine-ecosystem-structure-prior-to-the-k-pg-extinction
#9
Jeremy E Martin, Peggy Vincent, Théo Tacail, Fatima Khaldoune, Essaid Jourani, Nathalie Bardet, Vincent Balter
The collapse of marine ecosystems during the end-Cretaceous mass extinction involved the base of the food chain [1] up to ubiquitous vertebrate apex predators [2-5]. Large marine reptiles became suddenly extinct at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary, whereas other contemporaneous groups such as bothremydid turtles or dyrosaurid crocodylomorphs, although affected at the familial, genus, or species level, survived into post-crisis environments of the Paleocene [5-9] and could have found refuge in freshwater habitats [10-12]...
June 5, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545092/are-thermal-barriers-higher-in-deep-sea-turtle-nests
#10
Pilar Santidrián Tomillo, Luis Fonseca, Frank V Paladino, James R Spotila, Daniel Oro
Thermal tolerances are affected by the range of temperatures that species encounter in their habitat. Daniel Janzen hypothesized in his "Why mountain passes are higher in the tropics" that temperature gradients were effective barriers to animal movements where climatic uniformity was high. Sea turtles bury their eggs providing some thermal stability that varies with depth. We assessed the relationship between thermal uniformity and thermal tolerance in nests of three species of sea turtles. We considered that barriers were "high" when small thermal changes had comparatively large effects and "low" when the effects were small...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28524816/phylogenetic-variation-of-chelonid-alphaherpesvirus-5-in-green-turtle-chelonia-mydas-populations-along-the-queensland-coast-australia
#11
E Ariel, F Nainu, K Jones, K Juntunen, I Bell, J Gaston, J Scott, S Trocini, G W Burgess
Sea turtle fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a disease marked by proliferation of benign but debilitating cutaneous and occasional visceral tumours, likely to be caused by chelonid alphaherpesvirus 5 (ChHV5). This study presents a phylogeny of ChHV5 strains on the east coast of Queensland, Australia and a validation for previously unused primers. Two different primer sets (gB-1534 and gB-813) were designed to target a region including part of the UL27 glycoprotein B (gB) gene and part of UL28 of ChHV5. Sequences obtained from FP tumours on juvenile green turtles (<65 cm CCL) had substantial homology with published ChHV5 sequences while a skin biopsy from a turtle without FP failed to react in the PCRs used in this study...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Aquatic Animal Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521388/non-targeted-high-resolution-mass-spectrometry-strategy-for-simultaneous-monitoring-of-xenobiotics-and-endogenous-compounds-in-green-sea-turtles-on-the-great-barrier-reef
#12
Amy L Heffernan, Maria M Gómez-Ramos, Caroline Gaus, Soumini Vijayasarathy, Ian Bell, Christine Hof, Jochen F Mueller, Maria J Gómez-Ramos
Chemical contamination poses a threat to ecosystem, biota and human health, and identifying these hazards is a complex challenge. Traditional hazard identification relies on a priori-defined targets of limited chemical scope, and is generally inappropriate for exploratory studies such as explaining toxicological effects in environmental systems. Here we present a non-target high resolution mass spectrometry environmental monitoring study with multivariate statistical analysis to simultaneously detect biomarkers of exposure (e...
December 1, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28496982/blood-gases-biochemistry-and-haematology-of-gal%C3%A3-pagos-hawksbill-turtles-eretmochelys-imbricata
#13
Juan Pablo Muñoz-Pérez, Gregory A Lewbart, Maximilian Hirschfeld, Daniela Alarcón-Ruales, Judith Denkinger, Jason Guillermo Castañeda, Juan García, Kenneth J Lohmann
The hawksbill turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata, is a marine chelonian with a circum-global distribution, but the species is critically endangered and has nearly vanished from the eastern Pacific. Although reference blood parameter intervals have been published for many chelonian species and populations, including nesting Atlantic hawksbills, no such baseline biochemical and blood gas values have been reported for wild Pacific hawksbill turtles. Blood samples were drawn from eight hawksbill turtles captured in near shore foraging locations within the Galápagos archipelago over a period of four sequential years; three of these turtles were recaptured and sampled on multiple occasions...
2017: Conservation Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28487057/investigation-of-plastic-debris-ingestion-by-four-species-of-sea-turtles-collected-as-bycatch-in-pelagic-pacific-longline-fisheries
#14
Katharine E Clukey, Christopher A Lepczyk, George H Balazs, Thierry M Work, Jennifer M Lynch
Ingestion of marine debris is an established threat to sea turtles. The amount, type, color and location of ingested plastics in the gastrointestinal tracts of 55 sea turtles from Pacific longline fisheries from 2012 to 2016 were quantified, and compared across species, turtle length, body condition, sex, capture location, season and year. Six approaches for quantifying amounts of ingested plastic strongly correlated with one another and included: number of pieces, mass, volume and surface area of plastics, ratio of plastic mass to body mass, and percentage of the mass of gut contents consisting of plastic...
May 6, 2017: Marine Pollution Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28482460/exploring-the-presence-of-pollutants-at-sea-monitoring-heavy-metals-and-pesticides-in-loggerhead-turtles-caretta-caretta-from-the-western-mediterranean
#15
O Novillo, J F Pertusa, J Tomás
Marine turtles are considered good sentinel species for environmental assessment because of their long lifespan, feeding ecology, habitat use and migratory nature. In the present study, we assessed presence of cadmium, lead and mercury, together with organic pollutants, both in fat and muscle tissue of 25 stranded loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) stranded along the Valencian Community coast (East Spain) (43.7±13.5cm). Mean concentrations of Cd, Pb and Hg were 0.04μg/g w.w., 0.09μg/g w.w. and 0.03μg/g w...
November 15, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28477173/shared-epizoic-taxa-and-differences-in-diatom-community-structure-between-green-turtles-chelonia-mydas-from-distant-habitats
#16
Roksana Majewska, Bart Van de Vijver, Ali Nasrolahi, Maryam Ehsanpour, Majid Afkhami, Federico Bolaños, Franco Iamunno, Mario Santoro, Mario De Stefano
The first reports of diatoms growing on marine mammals date back to the early 1900s. However, only recently has direct evidence been provided for similar associations between diatoms and sea turtles. We present a comparison of diatom communities inhabiting carapaces of green turtles Chelonia mydas sampled at two remote sites located within the Indian (Iran) and Atlantic (Costa Rica) Ocean basins. Diatom observations and counts were carried out using scanning electron microscopy. Techniques involving critical point drying enabled observations of diatoms and other microepibionts still attached to sea turtle carapace and revealed specific aspects of the epizoic community structure...
May 6, 2017: Microbial Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28476351/evidence-of-antibiotic-resistance-in-enterobacteriales-isolated-from-green-sea-turtles-chelonia-mydas-on-the-great-barrier-reef
#17
Md Shamim Ahasan, Jacqueline Picard, Lisa Elliott, Robert Kinobe, Leigh Owens, Ellen Ariel
This study investigated Enterobacteriales and their antimicrobial resistance in green sea turtles captured adjacent to the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and proximate to urban development. Cloacal swabs were taken from 73 green turtles between 2015 and 2016. A total of 154 out of 341 Gram-negative bacterial isolates were identified as Enterobacteriales that represent 16 different species from 9 different genera. The dominant isolates were Citrobacter (30.52%), Edwardsiella (21.43%) and Escherichia (12.34%)...
May 2, 2017: Marine Pollution Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28462017/an-interview-based-approach-to-assess-sea-turtle-bycatch-in-italian-waters
#18
Alessandro Lucchetti, Claudio Vasapollo, Massimo Virgili
The loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta, Linnaeus, 1758) is the most abundant sea turtle species in the Mediterranean Sea, where commercial fishing appears to be the main driver of mortality. So far, information on sea turtle bycatch in Italy is limited both in space and time due to logistical problems in data collected through onboard observations and on a limited number of vessels involved. In the present study, sea turtle bycatch in Italian waters was examined by collecting fishermen's information on turtle bycatch through an interview-based approach...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438079/potential-non-cutaneous-sites-of-chelonid-herpesvirus-5-persistence-and-shedding-in-green-sea-turtles-chelonia-mydas
#19
Annie Page-Karjian, Nicole L Gottdenker, Jordyn Whitfield, Lawrence Herbst, Terry M Norton, Branson Ritchie
Chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5), the likely etiologic agent of sea turtle fibropapillomatosis (FP), is predicted to be unevenly distributed within an infected turtle, with productive virus replication and virion shedding occurring in cutaneous tumor keratinocytes. In this study, we measured and compared ChHV5 DNA quantities in tumors, skin, urine, major organs, and nervous tissue samples. These samples were taken from the carcasses of 10 juvenile green turtles (Chelonia mydas) with and without clinical signs of FP that stranded in Florida, USA during 2014...
April 24, 2017: Journal of Aquatic Animal Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425423/pathology-and-molecular-analysis-of-hapalotrema-mistroides-digenea-spirorchiidae-infecting-a-mediterranean-loggerhead-turtle-caretta-caretta
#20
M Santoro, F Di Nocera, D Iaccarino, S P Lawton, A Cerrone, B Degli Uberti, M D'Amore, A Affuso, S Hochscheid, F Maffucci, G Galiero
Turtle blood flukes belonging to the family Spirorchiidae (Digenea) represent a major threat for sea turtle health and are considered the most important parasitic cause of turtle stranding and mortality worldwide. Despite the large diversity of spirorchiid species found globally, there are only 2 records for free-ranging Mediterranean sea turtles that date back to the late 1800s involving just Hapalotrema mistroides Monticelli, 1896. This study describes the first fatal confirmed case of spirorchiidiasis in a free-ranging Mediterranean loggerhead turtle Caretta caretta (Linnaeus) and, owing to the complexities of taxonomic identification of these parasites, provides the first molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of H...
April 20, 2017: Diseases of Aquatic Organisms
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