Read by QxMD icon Read

nutrition hyperphosphatemia

Adamasco Cupisti, Claudia D'Alessandro, Biagio Di Iorio, Anna Bottai, Claudia Zullo, Domenico Giannese, Massimiliano Barsotti, Maria Francesca Egidi
BACKGROUND: Dietary treatment is helpful in CKD patients, but nutritional interventions are scarcely implemented. The main concern of the renal diets is its feasibility with regards to daily clinical practice especially in the elderly and co-morbid patients. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a pragmatic, step-wise, personalized nutritional support in the management of CKD patients on tertiary care. METHODS: This is a case-control study. It included 823 prevalent out-patients affected by CKD stage 3b to 5 not-in-dialysis, followed by tertiary care in nephrology clinics; 305 patients (190 males, aged 70 ± 12 years) received nutritional support (nutritional treatment Group, NTG); 518 patients (281 males, aged 73 ± 13 years) who did not receive any dietary therapy, formed the control group (CG)...
2016: BMC Nephrology
Adamasco Cupisti, Claudia D'Alessandro, Gian Marco Caselli
Nutritional abnormalities and physical inactivity are risk factors of increased morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD. Identify and define malnutrition, in particular protein-energy depletion (PEW), is an important task in the management of renal patients. The aim of this multicenter observational study was to implement the assessment of nutritional status and functional capacity in patients on peritoneal dialysis, including tests and validated methods which are relatively easy to apply in daily clinical practice...
July 2016: Giornale Italiano di Nefrologia: Organo Ufficiale Della Società Italiana di Nefrologia
Ivica Vrdoljak, Ines Panjkota Krbavčić, Martina Bituh, Ninoslav Leko, Draško Pavlović, Tea Vrdoljak Margeta
Introduction Control of serum phosphate is important for patients on hemodialysis. The aim of the study was to determine if education based on phosphorus-reducing techniques in food preparation and thermal processing, and accordingly prepared and applied diets, will lead to better outcomes than a standard education program to improve phosphate control in patients on hemodialysis. Methods Forty-seven patients on hemodialysis were divided between an intervention and a control group. All subjects received training about nutrition for hemodialysis patients by trained dietitian...
August 16, 2016: Hemodialysis International
John P Bilezikian, Maria Luisa Brandi, Natalie E Cusano, Michael Mannstadt, Lars Rejnmark, René Rizzoli, Mishaela R Rubin, Karen K Winer, Uri A Liberman, John T Potts
CONTEXT: Conventional management of hypoparathyroidism has focused upon maintaining the serum calcium with oral calcium and active vitamin D, often requiring high doses and giving rise to concerns about long-term consequences including renal and brain calcifications. Replacement therapy with PTH has recently become available. This paper summarizes the results of the findings and recommendations of the Working Group on Management of Hypoparathyroidism. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Contributing authors reviewed the literature regarding physiology, pathophysiology, and nutritional aspects of hypoparathyroidism, management of acute hypocalcemia, clinical aspects of chronic management, and replacement therapy of hypoparathyroidism with PTH peptides...
June 2016: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Lisa Gutekunst
Control of serum phosphorus (PO4) has been long recognized as a goal in the nutritional and medical management of the patients with chronic kidney disease. Phosphate-binding compounds were introduced in the 1970s for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in patients on dialysis after it was observed that oral administration of aluminum hydroxide as an antacid also reduced serum PO4 levels. Forty years later, aluminum is very seldom used as a phosphate binder as many other safer compounds are now available. This article is a comprehensive review, geared to the renal dietitian, of the most common binder categories...
July 2016: Journal of Renal Nutrition
Csaba P Kovesdy, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh
Lowering dietary protein intake (DPI) to approximately 0.6-0.8 g/kgBW/day may be renoprotective through various mechanisms, and it has been recommended in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) as a means to also control various metabolic consequences of advanced CKD, such as uremic symptoms, hyperparathyroidism, hypertension, hyperkalemia, and hyperphosphatemia. A meta-analysis in this issue of the Journal suggests that low-protein diet is effective and safe when used to retard progression of CKD and alleviate uremic complications...
May 2016: International Urology and Nephrology
David E St-Jules, Kathleen Woolf, Mary Lou Pompeii, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, Mary Ann Sevick
Dietary phosphorus restriction is recommended to help control hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients, but many high-phosphorus foods are important sources of protein. In this review, we examine whether restricting dietary phosphorus compromises protein status in hemodialysis patients. Although dietary phosphorus and protein are highly correlated, phosphorus intakes can range up to 600 mg/day for a given energy and protein intake level. Furthermore, the collinearity of phosphorus and protein may be biased because the phosphorus burden of food depends on: (1) the presence of phosphate additives, (2) food preparation method, and (3) bioavailability of phosphorus, which are often unaccounted for in nutrition assessments...
May 2016: Journal of Renal Nutrition
Mark R Haussler, G Kerr Whitfield, Carol A Haussler, Marya S Sabir, Zainab Khan, Ruby Sandoval, Peter W Jurutka
1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) is the renal metabolite of vitamin D that signals through binding to the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR). The ligand-receptor complex transcriptionally regulates genes encoding factors stimulating calcium and phosphate absorption plus bone remodeling, maintaining a skeleton with reduced risk of age-related osteoporotic fractures. 1,25D/VDR signaling exerts feedback control of Ca/PO4 via regulation of FGF23, klotho, and CYP24A1 to prevent age-related, ectopic calcification, fibrosis, and associated pathologies...
2016: Vitamins and Hormones
Zheng Jiang, Xiaoyan Zhang, Lichuan Yang, Zi Li, Wei Qin
BACKGROUND: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the restricted protein diet (low or very low protein diet) supplemented with keto analogues in the treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD). METHODS: The Cochrane library, PubMed, Embase, CBM and CENTRAL databases were searched and reviewed up to April 2015. Clinical trials were analyzed using RevMan 5.3 software. RESULTS: Seven random control trials, one cross-over trial and one non-randomized concurrent control trial were selected and included in this study according to our inclusion and exclusion criteria...
March 2016: International Urology and Nephrology
Coral Parikh, Victoria Gutgarts, Elliot Eisenberg, Michal L Melamed
Most dialysis patients are vitamin D deficient, including deficiencies in both activated vitamin D (1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D) and the less active 25-hydroxyvitamin D. These and other abnormalities associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), if they remain untreated, lead to secondary hyperparathyroidism and bone changes, such as osteitis fibrosa cystica. Activated vitamin D has been proven to decrease parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in dialysis patients and is currently used for this indication. There are multiple other potential "pleotrophic" effects associated with vitamin D therapy...
November 2015: Seminars in Dialysis
Jemma McCutcheon, Katrina Campbell, Maree Ferguson, Sarah Day, Megan Rossi
OBJECTIVE: Phosphorus-based food additives may pose a significant risk in chronic kidney disease given the link between hyperphosphatemia and cardiovascular disease. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of phosphorus-based food additives in best-selling processed grocery products and to establish how they were reported on food labels. DESIGN: A data set of 3000 best-selling grocery items in Australia across 15 food and beverage categories was obtained for the 12 months ending December 2013 produced by the Nielsen Company's Homescan database...
September 2015: Journal of Renal Nutrition
William Beaubien-Souligny, Sarah Bezzaoucha, Vincent Pichette, Jean-Philippe Lafrance, Robert Bell, Caroline Lamarche, Denis Ouimet, Michel Vallee
PURPOSE: Hyperphosphatemia and metabolic acidosis are frequently encountered in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Correction of metabolic acidosis in patients with advanced CKD leads to a decrease in the progression of renal impairment and improves nutritional outcomes. Lanthanum carbonate is used for control of hyperphosphatemia. This study evaluated the effect of lanthanum carbonate on metabolic acidosis in CKD IV-V patients and in patients on dialysis. METHODS: Retrospective data of patients in whom lanthanum carbonate therapy was initiated were collected from 2009 to 2013 in a single dialysis center...
July 2015: International Urology and Nephrology
Ivica Vrdoljak, Ines Panjkota Krbavčić, Martina Bituh, Tea Vrdoljak, Zoran Dujmić
OBJECTIVE: To analyze how different thermal processing methods affect the protein, calcium, and phosphorus content of hospital food served to dialysis patients and to generate recommendations for preparing menus that optimize nutritional content while minimizing the risk of hyperphosphatemia. DESIGN AND METHODS: Standard Official Methods of Analysis (AOAC) methods were used to determine dry matter, protein, calcium, and phosphorus content in potatoes, fresh and frozen carrots, frozen green beans, chicken, beef and pork, frozen hake, pasta, and rice...
May 2015: Journal of Renal Nutrition
A Galassi, A Cupisti, A Santoro, M Cozzolino
Phosphate metabolism is crucial in the pathophysiology of secondary hyperparathyroidism and vascular calcification. High phosphate levels have been consistently associated with unfavorable outcomes in dialysis patients, but several limitations are still hampering a resolutive definition of the optimal targets of phosphate serum levels to be achieved in this cohort. Nonetheless, hyperphosphatemia is a late marker of phosphate overload in humans. Clinical nephrologists routinely counteract the positive phosphate balance in dialysis patients through nutritional counseling, stronger phosphate removal by dialysis and prescription of phosphate binders...
August 2015: Journal of Nephrology
Mirey Karavetian, Nanne de Vries, Rana Rizk, Hafez Elzein
Strategies to enhance knowledge of and adherence to dietary guidelines for management of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients have been studied extensively over the past decade. This review is the first to compile all of them (2003-2013) and conduct a meta-analysis through calculation of effect size, with the aim of identifying the optimal nutrition education methods for effective management of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients. The following strategies were identified as being effective in changing dietary behavior: 1) use of self-evaluation and self-regulation techniques within educational tools, along with easy-to-apply skills; 2) individualized counseling by a renal dietitian provided just before the hemodialysis session; 3) high-intensity education; and 4) long duration of interventions...
July 2014: Nutrition Reviews
Denis Fouque, Rob Horne, Mario Cozzolino, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh
Elevated serum phosphorus levels are common in patients with chronic kidney disease and are associated with heart and vascular disease, conditions that in turn are associated with increased mortality. Accurately managing phosphorus intake by restricting dietary protein alone can prove challenging because protein from different sources can contain varying amounts of available phosphorus. Additives used in processed foods frequently are high in inorganic phosphorus, which is readily absorbed, compounding this difficulty...
July 2014: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Piergiorgio Bolasco
Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is the first main goal of CKD-MBD management. Therefore, special attention is required to prevent a positive phosphate balance. In addition to a careful use of phosphate binders and dietary, phosphate control is needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance. In well-nourished patients is necessary to provide an optimal dialysis removal schedule. A solution could be the increase of the number of dialysis sessions per week and to carry out longer dialysis session strategies...
March 2014: Giornale Italiano di Nefrologia: Organo Ufficiale Della Società Italiana di Nefrologia
Denis Fouque, Maria Cruz Casal, Elizabeth Lindley, Susan Rogers, Jitka Pancířová, Jennifer Kernc, J Brian Copley
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to review the opinions and experiences of renal care professionals to examine dietary trends among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and problems associated with the clinical management of hyperphosphatemia. DESIGN: This was an online survey comprising open and closed questions requesting information on patient dietary trends and the clinical management of hyperphosphatemia. The study was conducted in 4 European countries (the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom)...
March 2014: Journal of Renal Nutrition
Biagio Di Iorio, Lucia Di Micco
The fear of malnutrition, caused by the low-protein diet, conditions in an inappropriate use of a useful nutrition therapy in Chronic Kidney Disease. Often malnutrition is due to reduced intake of energy, because a low (or very low) protein proper diet with adequate amount of calories (30-35 cal/kg bw/day). We analyze the positive aspects of the low-protein diet for optimal control of hypertension, hyperphosphatemia, anemia, and proteinuria that is the goal of pharmacological management Chronic Kidney Disease patients...
November 2013: Giornale Italiano di Nefrologia: Organo Ufficiale Della Società Italiana di Nefrologia
Kamel El-Reshaid
Refeeding syndrome (RS) is a serious and potentially fatal disorder. It is caused by a shift of fluids, sodium, potassium, magnesium and phosphorus as well changes in the metabolism of glucose, protein, fat and vitamins following the refeeding of malnourished patients, whether enterally or parenterally. RS has rarely been reported in patients with advanced kidney disease probably due to the pre-existing hyperphosphatemia, hypermagnesemia and hyperkalemia in these patients. In the following report, we present a patient with nephronophthisis type 1 deletion syndrome in whom her main previous nutrition was limited to simply rehydration to avoid renal replacement therapy...
November 2013: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"