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Limbal deficiency

Anna Cressey, Deborah S Jacobs, Crystal Remington, Karen G Carrasquillo
Purpose: To demonstrate clearing of chronic corneal opacities and improvement of visual acuity with the use of BostonSight prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem (PROSE) treatment in ocular surface disease. Observations: We undertook retrospective analysis of the medical records of a series of patients who underwent PROSE treatment from August 2006 to December 2014. Patients were referred for ocular surface disease of various etiologies. Primary inclusion criterion was corneal opacity that improved with PROSE treatment...
June 2018: American Journal of Ophthalmology Case Reports
Milad Modabber, Mona Harissi-Dagher
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 15, 2018: Ocular Immunology and Inflammation
Cristina Nicula, Izabela Szabo, Ozana Ivan
The article presents the modern treatment with stem cells in the reconstruction of ocular surface. The turnover of the stem cells, the location in the limbus areas, the importance of limbal stem cells presence, the clinical appearance of stem cell deficiency, investigations method for this illness and the management of stem cell deficiency (artificial lacrimal tear drops, mini scleral contact lenses and the surgical treatment with allografts and autografts of stem cells) were taken into account.
October 2017: Romanian Journal of Ophthalmology
Nada Tarek Hassan Mohamed, Neveen Ahmed AbdelAziz
Adult stem cells are somatic stem cells distributed all over the body. They represent a promising future for regenera-tive medicine because of their multiple advantages as they are widely available, accessible, easily stored and manipulated to a wide range of cells and with minimal invasive extraction. This review describes three examples of adult stem cells: oral mucosal epithelial stem cells, human immature dental pulp stem cells and hair follicle bulge stem cells that show an ability to correct limbal stem cell deficiency, their isolation and cultivation methods, feeder layers, carriers, markers expressed, successfulness to regenerate the ocular surface and mimic the corneal function in LSCD...
February 23, 2018: Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy
Yuzuru Sasamoto, Bruce R Ksander, Markus H Frank, Natasha Y Frank
The corneal epithelium is maintained by limbal stem cells (LSCs) that reside in the basal epithelial layer of the tissue surrounding the cornea termed the limbus. Loss of LSCs results in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) that can cause severe visual impairment. Patients with partial LSCD may respond to conservative therapies designed to rehabilitate the remaining LSCs. However, if these conservative approaches fail or, if complete loss of LSCs occurs, transplantation of LSCs or their alternatives is the only option...
February 23, 2018: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Sayan Basu, Sashwanthi Mohan, Swapnil Bhalekar, Vivek Singh, Virender Sangwan
AIMS: Cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET) fails in around 20%-30% of cases. This study aimed to report the clinical outcomes of autologous simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) in eyes with recurrent unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) due to failure of CLET. METHODS: This was a prospective case series which included 30 eyes of 30 patients who underwent SLET between 2010 and 2016 after failure of one (n=24) or two (n=6) previous CLET procedures for chronic unilateral ocular burns...
February 16, 2018: British Journal of Ophthalmology
Gustavo S Figueiredo, Borja Salvador-Culla, Oliver J Baylis, Hardeep S Mudhar, Majlinda Lako, Francisco C Figueiredo
PURPOSE: To investigate the outcomes of penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) following autologous cultivated limbal epithelial stem cell transplantation (CLET). METHODS: A prospective, single centre, interventional cohort study investigating patients with unilateral total limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) treated with CLET who underwent PKP. Patients with confirmed corneal re-epithelialization > 6 months post-CLET, and with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) <0...
February 13, 2018: Stem Cells
Jing Sun, Wei-Hua Liu, Feng-Mei Deng, Yong-Hui Luo, Ke Wen, Hong Zhang, Hai-Rong Liu, Jiang Wu, Bing-Yin Su, Yi-Lun Liu
Corneal integrity, transparency and vision acuity are maintained by corneal epithelial cells (CECs), which are continuously renewed by corneal limbal stem cells (LSCs). Deficiency of CECs and/or LSCs is associated with numerous ocular diseases. Paired box (PAX)6 is an eye development-associated transcription factor that is necessary for cell fate determination and differentiation of LSCs and CECs. In the present study, the PAX6 gene was introduced into adipose-derived rat mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) to investigate whether PAX6-transfected cells were able to transdifferentiate into corneal-like epithelial cells and to further verify whether the cells were suitable as a cell source for corneal transplantation...
February 2018: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Michael T B Nguyen, Vishakha Thakrar, Clara C Chan
OBJECTIVE: To describe indications and outcomes of patients fitted with the EyePrintPRO therapeutic scleral lens. METHODS: A database search of patients fitted with the EyePrintPRO from 2014 to 2016. Fourteen eyes of 10 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Patient demographics, medical and ocular history, indications for fitting, duration of wear, symptoms, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were analyzed. RESULTS: Mean age at lens fitting was 49 years (range, 21-67 years)...
February 2018: Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology. Journal Canadien D'ophtalmologie
Kai B Kang, Faris I Karas, Ruju Rai, Joelle A Hallak, Joann J Kang, Jose de la Cruz, Maria S Cortina
Despite improved retention and reduced complication rates paving the way for the current expansion of applications and surge in prevalence for the Boston type I Keratoprosthesis (KPro), the most frequent indication for its implantation today remains prior graft failure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of primary KPro and compare to secondary implantation in a matched cohort study. This study included patients who underwent KPro implantation in a single center by two surgeons between July 2008 and October 2014...
2018: PloS One
Kristina Spaniol, Joana Witt, Sonja Mertsch, Maria Borrelli, Gerd Geerling, Stefan Schrader
PURPOSE: Limbal epithelial stem cells (LESC) reside in a niche in the corneo-scleral transition zone. Deficiency leads to pain, corneal opacity, and eventually blindness. LESC transplantation of ex-vivo expanded human LESC on a carrier such as human amniotic membrane is a current treatment option. We evaluated decellularised human limbus (DHL) as a potential carrier matrix for the transplantation of LESC. METHODS: Human corneas were obtained from the local eye bank...
February 1, 2018: Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
Felipe Mellado, Ignacia Fuentes, Francis Palisson, José I Vergara, Arturo Kantor
PURPOSE: This study describes ophthalmologic and systemic clinical findings in different subtypes of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) establishing genotype-phenotype correlations. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 58 patients with EB together with the Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Association, Chile. Data were stratified by major subtypes such as "simplex epidermolysis bullosa" (EBS), "junctional epidermolysis bullosa" (JEB), "recessive and dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa" and "dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa" (DDEB), and "Kindler syndrome" (KS)...
January 30, 2018: Cornea
Jayesh Vazirani, Dhanyasree Nair, Swapna Shanbhag, Siva Wurity, Abhishek Ranjan, Virender Sangwan
PURPOSE: To determine the demographic features of patients affected by limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), and to identify the underlying causes of LSCD DESIGN: Retrospective, multi-center case series SETTING: Two large tertiary care ophthalmology hospitals SUBJECTS: Patients with a diagnosis of LSCD presenting from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2014 METHODS: Records of patients with a clinical diagnosis of LSCD were reviewed. Demographic details and clinical features at presentation, as well as the underlying cause of LSCD (if identified) were noted...
January 26, 2018: American Journal of Ophthalmology
Nidhi Gupta, Jagdish Joshi, Javed Hussain Farooqui, Umang Mathur
PURPOSE: This study aimed to report the long-term outcomes of autologous Simple Limbal Epithelial Transplantation (SLET) performed for unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) following chemical burn at a tertiary eye center in North India. METHODS: This was a single-center prospective interventional case series of patients who developed unilateral LSCD after suffering from ocular surface burns and who underwent SLET between October 2012 and May 2016 with a follow-up period of at least 6 months...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology
Andrew Winegarner, Yoshinori Oie, Satoshi Kawasaki, Nozomi Nishida, Kohji Nishida
An aniridia patient was found to have a novel PAX6 mutation. A genetic duplication within PAX6 , which caused a frameshift mutation, ultimately created a nonsense stop codon and premature truncation of the protein. Consequently, the patient presented with a clouded cornea as a result of partial limbal stem cell deficiency, foveal hypoplasia, nystagmus and a pale, cupped optic disc caused by glaucoma.
2017: Human Genome Variation
Eung Kweon Kim, Ga-Hyun Lee, Boram Lee, Yong-Sun Maeng
Homeostasis and regeneration of corneal epithelia are sustained by limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs); thus, an LESC deficiency is a major cause of blindness worldwide. Despite the generally promising results of cultivated LESC transplantation, it has been limited by variations in long-term success rates, the use of xenogeneic and undefined culture components, and a scarcity of donor tissues. In this study, we identified the culture conditions required to expand LESCs in vitro and established human limbus-derived highly proliferative ABCG2+ /ABCB5+ double-positive LESCs...
2017: Stem Cells International
Taty Anna Kamarudin, Sanja Bojic, Joseph Collin, Min Yu, Sameer Alharthi, Harley Buck, Alex Shortt, Lyle Armstrong, Francisco C Figueiredo, Majlinda Lako
Cornea is a clear outermost layer of the eye which enables transmission of light onto the retina. The transparent corneal epithelium is regenerated by limbal stem cells (LSCs), whose loss/dysfunction results in LSCs deficiency (LSCD). Ex vivo expansion of autologous LSCs obtained from patient's healthy eye followed by transplantation onto the LSCs damaged/deficient eye, has provided a successful treatment for unilateral LSCD. However, this is not applicable to patient with total bilateral LSCD, where LSCs are lost/damaged from both eyes...
March 2018: Stem Cells
Karolien Termote, Steven Schendel, Gregory Moloney, Simon P Holland, Alex P Lange
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to summarize the clinical characteristics of patients with contact lens-associated focal limbal stem cell deficiency (FLSCD) from a tertiary corneal referral centre. DESIGN: Retrospective, observational case series in a tertiary care centre. METHODS: Patients with contact lens-associated FLCSD were identified in our database. Clinical data were retrieved by chart review. A questionnaire asking for contact lens brand, type, cleaning solution, and duration of contact lens wear was sent to the patients with telephone follow-up...
December 2017: Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology. Journal Canadien D'ophtalmologie
Virender S Sangwan, Swati Gupta, Shilpa Das
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cataracts are a significant cause of blindness and visual impairment worldwide. With the recent advances in cataract surgery techniques, outcomes have improved significantly in uncomplicated cases. This article discusses the challenges and outcomes of cataract surgery in complex cases targeting eyes with ocular surface diseases like Stevens-Johnson syndrome, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, Mooren's ulcer, vernal keratoconjunctivitis and limbal stem cell deficiency. RECENT FINDINGS: Ocular surface diseases are commonly associated with corneal scarring and vascularization, conjunctival inflammation, symblepharon and forniceal shortening...
January 2018: Current Opinion in Ophthalmology
R A Martínez García de la Torre, N Nieto-Nicolau, A Morales-Pastor, R P Casaroli-Marano
BACKGROUND: Limbal stem cells (LSC) are progenitor cells in the ocular surface that renew the corneal epithelium. Limbal stem cell deficiency usually induces blindness through the loss of corneal transparency, and bilateral cases do not an accurate treatment because of the lack of an autologous source of stem cells. METHODS: Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are promising for use in cell therapy because of their autologous origin and the capability to differentiate into corneal epithelial cells...
December 2017: Transplantation Proceedings
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