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Limbal deficiency

Fawzia Bardag-Gorce, Richard H Hoft, Andrew Wood, Joan Oliva, Hope Niihara, Andrew Makalinao, Jacquelyn Thropay, Derek Pan, Imara Meepe, Kumar Tiger, Julio Garcia, Amanda Laporte, Samuel W French, Yutaka Niihara
The role of E-cadherin in epithelial barrier function of cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) grafts was examined. CAOMECS were cultured on a temperature-responsive surface and grafted onto rabbit corneas with Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD). E-cadherin levels were significantly higher in CAOMECS compared to normal and LSCD epithelium. Beta-catenin colocalized with E-cadherin in CAOMECS cell membranes while phosphorylated beta-catenin was significantly increased. ZO-1, occludin, and Cnx43 were also strongly expressed in CAOMECS...
2016: Journal of Ophthalmology
Yunes Panahi, Danial Roshandel, Mohammad Mehdi Sadoughi, Mostafa Ghanei, Amirhossein Sahebkar
Sulfur mustard (SM; mustard gas) is a classic chemical warfare agent that has been used in several wars and is still a potential threat especially in the Middle-East region. Victims experience acute symptoms in air-exposed organs including skin, respiratory tract and the eyes. Survivors of the acute stage might develop chronic or delayed-onset complications in the exposed organs. The exact mechanism(s) of SM-induced tissue damage is still unknown, however DNA alkylation and oxidative damage are the most relevant mechanisms...
October 21, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Tom Bongiorno, Jena L Chojnowski, James D Lauderdale, Todd Sulchek
Healthy eyes contain a population of limbal stem cells (LSCs) that continuously renew the corneal epithelium. However, each year, 1 million Americans are afflicted with severely reduced visual acuity caused by corneal damage or disease, including LSC deficiency (LSCD). Recent advances in corneal transplant technology promise to repair the cornea by implanting healthy LSCs to encourage regeneration; however, success is limited to transplanted tissues that contain a sufficiently high percentage of LSCs. Attempts to screen limbal tissues for suitable implants using molecular stemness markers are confounded by the poorly understood signature of the LSC phenotype...
October 18, 2016: Biophysical Journal
Bakiah Shaharuddin, Sajjad Ahmad, Nani Md Latar, Simi Ali, Annette Meeson
: : Limbal stem cell (LSC) deficiency is a visually debilitating condition caused by abnormal maintenance of LSCs. It is treated by transplantation of donor-derived limbal epithelial cells (LECs), the success of which depends on the presence and quality of LSCs within the transplant. Understanding the immunobiological responses of these cells within the transplants could improve cell engraftment and survival. However, human corneal rings used as a source of LSCs are not always readily available for research purposes...
October 14, 2016: Stem Cells Translational Medicine
V Kocaba, O Damour, C Auxenfans, C Burillon
Limbal stem cell deficiency is predominantly caused by severe eye burns resulting in a decreased or a complete ablation of the regenerative potential of these stem cells. The inability to reconstruct the corneal epithelium further leads conjunctivalization of the gimbal-epithelial barrier. These abnormalities collectively result in the progressive opacification of the cornea responsible for blindness that is driven by chronic corneal ulceration and neovascularization. The underlying pathology of the cornea affects the homeostasis of the neighboring conjunctiva, eyelids, and tear film...
October 11, 2016: Journal Français D'ophtalmologie
Meeta Pathak, O K Olstad, Liv Drolsum, Morten C Moe, Natalia Smorodinova, Sarka Kalasova, Katerina Jirsova, Bjørn Nicolaissen, Agate Noer
Patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) often experience pain and photophobia due to recurrent epithelial defects and chronic inflammation of the cornea. Successfully restoring a healthy corneal surface in these patients by transplantation of ex vivo expanded human limbal epithelial cells (LECs) may alleviate these symptoms and significantly improve their quality of life. The clinical outcome of transplantation is known to be influenced by the quality of transplanted cells. Presently, several different protocols for cultivation and transplantation of LECs are in use...
October 1, 2016: Experimental Eye Research
Evgeny Kushnerev, Susan G Shawcross, Shankari Sothirachagan, Fiona Carley, Arun Brahma, Julian M Yates, M Chantal Hillarby
Purpose: The corneal epithelium is sloughed off surface of the eye by the action of blinking and is continually replaced by division and maturation of the limbal stem cells (LSCs). In the case of injury or disease, LSCs can be lost or damaged to a point at which the corneal epithelial layer is no longer maintained. leading to LSC deficiencies (LSCDs). When this occurs, the opaque conjunctiva overgrows the anterior surface of the eye, leading to vision impairment or loss. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are promising candidates as autologous LSC substitutes...
October 1, 2016: Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
Min Yu, Sanja Bojic, Gustavo S Figueiredo, Paul Rooney, Julian de Havilland, Anne Dickinson, Francisco C Figueiredo, Majlinda Lako
The cornea is a self-renewing tissue located at the front of the eye. Its transparency is essential for allowing light to focus onto the retina for visual perception. The continuous renewal of corneal epithelium is supported by limbal stem cells (LSCs) which are located in the border region between conjunctiva and cornea known as the limbus. Ex vivo expansion of LSCs has been successfully applied in the last two decades to treat patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Various methods have been used for their expansion, yet the most widely used culture media contains a number of ingredients derived from animal sources which may compromise the safety profile of human LSC transplantation...
September 28, 2016: Experimental Eye Research
Takashi Kojima, Asato Hasegawa, Tomoaki Nakamura, Naoki Isogai, Takahiro Kataoka, Kazuo Ichikawa
PURPOSE: Aniridic keratopathy is vision-threatening condition in patients with aniridia. The keratopathy occurs due to limbal stem cell deficiency. When conventional treatments fail, surgical treatments such as corneal limbal transplantation or cultivated oral mucosal epithelium transplantation are the alternatives. Here, we report our experience with the management and monitoring of the progress of a case with aniridic keratopathy treated with a scleral lens. CASE REPORT: We describe the case of a 30-year-old woman with aniridic keratopathy in both eyes...
October 2016: Optometry and Vision Science: Official Publication of the American Academy of Optometry
Massimo Busin, Claudia Breda, Marina Bertolin, Cristina Bovone, Diego Ponzin, Stefano Ferrari, Vanessa Barbaro, Hossein Mostafa Elbadawy
PURPOSE: To determine whether limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) repopulate the site harvested for limbal autograft transplantation (LAT), the expression of LESCs markers was evaluated in bioptic specimens obtained from the donor area 12 months or more after surgery. DESIGN: Interventional case series. PARTICIPANTS: Patients who underwent LAT for unilateral acquired limbal stem cell deficiency after chemical burn. METHODS: Corneal limbal explants were obtained from 2 sites, the harvested area and the untouched control area, in the donor eyes of 6 patients who previously underwent LAT for unilateral acquired limbal stem cell deficiency after chemical burn...
September 21, 2016: Ophthalmology
Qihua Le, Yujing Yang, Sophie X Deng, Jianjiang Xu
BACKGROUND: The aims of the study were to investigate limbal epithelial thickness in subjects with limbal stem cell deficiency and to evaluate the correlation between the palisades of Vogt and limbal epithelial thickness. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four subjects (39 eyes) with limbal stem cell deficiency and 20 normal controls (20 eyes). METHODS: Anterior segment optical coherence tomography and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to assess each quadrant of the limbus...
September 3, 2016: Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology
Adriano Fasolo, Emilio Pedrotti, Mattia Passilongo, Giorgio Marchini, Cristina Monterosso, Roberto Zampini, Elisabetta Bohm, Federica Birattari, Antonella Franch, Vanessa Barbaro, Marina Bertolin, Claudia Breda, Enzo Di Iorio, Barbara Ferrari, Stefano Ferrari, Mauro Meneguzzi, Diego Ponzin
PURPOSE: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of ex vivo autologous cultured limbal stem cell transplantation (CLET). METHODS: We reviewed the clinical records of 59 consecutive patients treated with 65 CLETs. Efficacy was graded 1 year after surgery as successful, partially successful or failed. A safety analysis was performed considering side effects and complications that were recorded during the first year after CLET and those reported later than 1 year, including the events related to subsequent treatments...
August 19, 2016: British Journal of Ophthalmology
Anna R O'Callaghan, Louise Morgan, Julie T Daniels, Mark P Lewis
AIM: To investigate human oral mucosal fibroblasts (HOMF) and human limbal fibroblasts (HLF) as alternatives to murine 3T3 feeder fibroblasts currently used to support epithelial cell expansion for the treatment of limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency. METHODS: HLF and HOMF were compared with 3T3s for their ability to support the culture of human limbal epithelial cells and human oral mucosal epithelial cells. RESULTS: HOMF, but not HLF, were equivalent to 3T3s in terms of the number of epithelial population doublings achieved...
September 2016: Regenerative Medicine
Pinnita Prabhasawat, Pattama Ekpo, Mongkol Uiprasertkul, Suksri Chotikavanich, Nattaporn Tesavibul, Kanograt Pornpanich, Panitee Luemsamran
The present study aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes of autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation (COMET) on human amniotic membrane (AM) for corneal limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). In this prospective, noncomparative case series, 20 eyes (18 patients) with bilateral severe ocular surface disease were chosen to undergo COMET on human AM. The primary outcome was clinical success, and the secondary outcomes were the best-corrected visual acuity difference, corneal opacification, symblepharon formation, and complications...
September 2016: Cell and Tissue Banking
Samantha Bobba, Nick Di Girolamo, Richard Mills, Mark Daniell, Elsie Chan, Damien G Harkin, Brendan G Cronin, Geoffrey Crawford, Charles McGhee, Stephanie Watson
BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine the nature and incidence of severe limbal stem cell deficiency in Australia and New Zealand. DESIGN: A one-year pilot surveillance study with a one-year follow-up period was conducted in association with the Australian and New Zealand Ophthalmic Surveillance Unit. PARTICIPANTS: The study included patients reported by practising ophthalmologists on the Surveillance Unit's database. METHODS: Ophthalmologists were provided with a definition of severe limbal stem cell deficiency, contacted on a monthly basis by the Unit and asked to report newly diagnosed cases...
August 9, 2016: Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology
Sudesh Kumar Arya, Anubha Bhatti, Amit Raj, Ravi Kant Bamotra
The epithelial cells of cornea constantly undergo renewal and regeneration and the stem cells responsible for renewal resides within basal epithelium at the limbus in palisades of Vogt. Simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) is a simplified technique for limbal stem cell deficiency and it combines the benefits of both conjunctival limbal autografting and cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation by being single-stage and utilizing minimal donor tissue. We will be discussing two cases of ocular surface disorder which were managed successfully by new technique simple limbal epithelial transplantation...
June 2016: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
J Jankowska-Szmul, D Dobrowolski, K Krysik, J Kwas, M Nejman, E Wylegala
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this work was to study the evolving trends in techniques and indications for corneal transplantation in Poland. METHODS: This retrospective, descriptive analysis of corneal transplantations was performed at the Ophthalmology Department of Saint Barbara Hospital, Trauma Center, Sosnowiec, Poland, between 1988 and 2014. Structure of indications and surgery type rates over 26 years were tabulated by means of 5-year intervals. RESULTS: Between 1989 and 2014, 1762 corneal transplantations were performed, including 1375 (78%) cases of penetrating keratoplasty, 137 (8%) lamellar keratoplasty, 112 (6%) patch grafts, and 138 (8%) keratolimbal allografts...
June 2016: Transplantation Proceedings
Medi Eslani, Zeeshan Haq, Asadolah Movahedan, Adam Moss, Alireza Baradaran-Rafii, Gautham Mogilishetty, Edward J Holland, Ali R Djalilian
PURPOSE: To describe the clinical presentation and management of late (>3.0 years) acute graft rejection in keratolimbal allograft (KLAL) recipients. METHODS: This was a multicenter, retrospective observational case series. Six eyes of 6 patients with ocular surface transplant at a mean age of 36.2 years were seen at 3 tertiary referral centers for acute graft rejection between 2007 and 2013. Main outcome measures included strength of systemic immunosuppression (SI) at the time of rejection, time to rejection, and clinical presentation of rejection...
July 27, 2016: Cornea
Shaokun Zhang, Zaoxia Liu, Guanfang Su, Hong Wu
The limbal epithelial cells can be maintained on 3T3 feeder layer with fetal bovine serum supplemented culture medium, and these cells have been used to successfully treat limbal stem cell deficiency. However, fetal bovine serum contains unknown components and displays quantitative and qualitative lot-to-lot variations. To improve the culture condition, the defined KnockOut serum replacement was investigated to replace fetal bovine serum for culturing human limbal epithelial cell. Human primary limbal epithelial cells were cultured in KnockOut serum and fetal bovine serum supplemented medium, respectively...
2016: Journal of Ophthalmology
Vikas Mittal, Purvasha Narang, Vikas Menon, Ruchi Mittal, Santosh Honavar
PURPOSE: To describe the utility of simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) along with tumor excision in the management of extensive ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) to avoid limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). METHODS: This case report describes the management of a 75-year-old man clinically diagnosed with OSSN involving more than 3 quadrants of limbus. The excisional biopsy of tumor along with 4-mm healthy margin led to a complete loss of the limbus, which was restored by limbal epithelial cell transplantation using the SLET technique in the same setting...
July 20, 2016: Cornea
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