Read by QxMD icon Read


Karen H Wang, Joseph L Goulet, Constance M Carroll, Melissa Skanderson, Samah Fodeh, Joseph Erdos, Julie A Womack, Erica A Abel, Harini Bathulapalli, Amy C Justice, Marcella Nunez-Smith, Cynthia A Brandt
BACKGROUND: Healthcare mobility, defined as healthcare utilization in more than one distinct healthcare system, may have detrimental effects on outcomes of care. We characterized healthcare mobility and associated characteristics among a national sample of Veterans. METHODS: Using the Veterans Health Administration Electronic Health Record, we conducted a retrospective cohort study to quantify healthcare mobility within a four year period. We examined the association between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and healthcare mobility, and characterized possible temporal and geographic patterns of healthcare mobility...
October 21, 2016: BMC Health Services Research
Gladys E Ibañez, Elaine Whitt, Tenesha Avent, Steve S Martin, Leah M Varga, Miguel A Cano, Daniel J O'Connell
OBJECTIVES: Latina women are disproportionately affected by HIV in the US, and account for 30% of all HIV infections in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The main risk for Latina women is heterosexual contact. Little is known about the relational and cultural factors that may impact women's HIV risk perception. This study aims to describe Latina women's perception of their HIV risk within a relational, cultural, and linguistic context. DESIGN: Eight focus groups of Latina women (n = 28), four English speaking groups and four Spanish speaking groups, were conducted between December 2013 and May 2014...
October 21, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Grete Mehus, Alf Gunnar Mehus, Sidsel Germeten, Nils Henriksen
INTRODUCTION: Snowmobiling among young people in Scandinavia frequently leads to accidents and injuries. Systematic studies of accidents exist, but few studies have addressed young drivers' experiences. The aim of this article is to reveal how young people experience and interpret accidents, and to outline a prevention strategy. METHODS: Thirty-one girls and 50 boys aged 16-23 years from secondary schools in Northern Norway and on Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, participated in 17 focus groups segregated by gender...
October 2016: Rural and Remote Health
Anne Justice-Allen, Kerrie Anne Loyd
Western Burrowing Owls ( Athene cunicularia hypugaea) frequently occupy periurban areas, where they may be exposed to pest control agents. This short communication describes necropsy findings and detected brodifacoum rodenticide levels for four Western Burrowing Owls in Lake Havasu City, Arizona, US, 2013-15. Levels detected ranged from 0.077 mg/kg to 0.497 mg/kg. Brodifacoum, one of several second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides recently removed from the general consumer market, is still available for use by licensed pesticide applicators...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Wildlife Diseases
Mauro Castelló González, Reinaldo Pons Vásquez, David Rodriguez Bencomo, Imti Choonara
Over 50,000 Cuban health professionals are currently working overseas in 67 different countries. They work in conjunction with local health professionals. The majority work in primary care in deprived areas. The aim is to reduce morbidity and mortality but also improve health in the long term by training local health professionals, and building both institutions and a structure to deliver health care alongside educating the local population. Cuba is a small, middle-income country. It has, however, made a significant international contribution in relation to medical collaboration...
October 18, 2016: Children
Maya K Gislason, Holly K Andersen
We consider the case of intensive resource extractive projects in the Blueberry River First Nations in Northern British Columbia, Canada, as a case study. Drawing on the parallels between concepts of cumulative environmental and cumulative health impacts, we highlight three axes along which to gauge the effects of intensive extraction projects. These are environmental, health, and social justice axes. Using an intersectional analysis highlights the way in which using individual indicators to measure impact, rather than considering cumulative effects, hides the full extent by which the affected First Nations communities are impacted by intensive extraction projects...
October 18, 2016: Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland)
Jennifer Anderson, Julie Hulstein
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Paul L Schneider, Zhaoping Li
OBJECTIVE: To provide a thorough analysis of the range of ethical concerns that may present in relation to the care of the morbidly obese inpatient over the course of several years of care. METHODS: A narrative of the patient's complex medical care is given, with particular attention to the recommendations of three separate ethics committee consultations that were sought by his health care providers. An ethical analysis of the relevant issues is given within the Principles of Biomedical Ethics framework, highlighting the principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice...
2016: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics
John M Janzen
This study, with a focus on Central and Southern Africa, offers an overview of best practices and theoretical debates in the anthropology of violence, including the ethnography of situations where violence is pervasive and active efforts are made to deal with it. Although the multiple sites of recent violence in this region are unique in their scale, intensity, and cause, the literature review suggests a typical course of events of patterns of violence and trauma, construction of memory, efforts at mediation and healing, or persisting conflict and confronting the aftermath of violence at home or in exile...
September 2016: Journal of Public Health Policy
Susan Hillis, James Mercy, Janet Saul, Jessie Gleckel, Neetu Abad, Howard Kress
More than 1 billion children - half the children in the world - are victims of violence every year. As part of the Post-2015 sustainable development agenda, the UN has issued a global call-to-action: to eliminate violence against children. Essential to preventing violence against children is guidance to countries on using the best available evidence to address this problem. THRIVES provides this evidence. It represents a framework of complementary strategies that, taken together, have potential to achieve and sustain efforts to prevent violence against children...
September 2016: Journal of Public Health Policy
Birong Li, Babitha Haridas, Ashley R Jackson, Hanna Cortado, Nicholas Mayne, Rebecca Kohnken, Brad Bolon, Kirk M McHugh, Andrew L Schwaderer, John D Spencer, Christina B Ching, David S Hains, Sheryl S Justice, Santiago Partida-Sanchez, Brian Becknell
Acquired renal scarring occurs in a subset of patients following febrile urinary tract infections and is associated with hypertension, proteinuria, and chronic kidney disease. Limited knowledge of histopathology, immune cell recruitment and gene expression changes during pyelonephritis restricts the development of therapies to limit renal scarring. Here, we address this knowledge gap using immunocompetent mice with vesicoureteral reflux. Transurethral inoculation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in C3H/HeOuJ mice leads to renal mucosal injury, tubulointerstitial nephritis, and cortical fibrosis...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology
Beth A Ekelman, Darcy L Allison, Dario Duvnjak, Dorothy R DiMarino, John Jodzio, Paolo V Iannarelli
Little is known about how participating in a wellness program influences the well-being of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study is to explore how men with SCI describe their experiences and meaning of participating in a wellness center program, how they perceived these experiences as influencing their well-being, and how these experiences relate to co-occupations and occupational spin-off concepts. Investigators employed a descriptive qualitative design. Four adult males with an SCI participated in the study...
October 6, 2016: OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health
David Shaw, Guido de Wert, Wybo Dondorp, David Townend, Gerard Bos, Michel van Gelder
In this article we explore the ethical issues raised by permitting patients to pay for participation (P4) in clinical trials, and discuss whether there are any categorical objections to this practice. We address key considerations concerning payment for participation in trials, including patient autonomy, risk/benefit and justice, taking account of two previous critiques of the ethics of P4. We conclude that such trials could be ethical under certain strict conditions, but only if other potential sources of funding have first been explored or are unavailable...
October 18, 2016: Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy
Mohammad Hossein Mehrolhasani, Sajad Khosravi, Mahya Tohidi
INTRODUCTION: In order to improve health, hospital sources such as beds and staffing should be properly allocated and used. The aim of this study is reallocation of Shafa hospital beds in Kerman using a goal-programming model. METHODS: This study was an applied cross-sectional study, which used the goal programming model and software WinQSB to optimize bed allocation. By review of the literature and interviews with experts, the constraints in beds allocation were identified, and using the collected data the desired model was designed...
August 2016: Electronic Physician
Kasper Raus
BACKGROUND: When a new intervention or drug is developed, this has to pass through various phases of clinical testing before it achieves market approval, which can take many years. This raises an issue for drugs which could benefit terminally ill patients. These patients might set their hopes on the experimental drug but are unable to wait since they are likely to pass away before the drug is available. As a means of nevertheless getting access to experimental drug, many seriously ill and terminally ill patients are therefore very willing to participate in randomised controlled trials...
October 18, 2016: BMC Medical Ethics
Thitika Kitpipit, Phuvadol Thanakiatkrai, Kitichaya Penchart, Kanita Ouithavon, Chutamas Satasook, Adrian Linacre
Despite continuous conservation efforts by national and international organizations, the populations of the three extant elephant species are still dramatically declining due to the illegal trade in ivory leading to the killing of elephants. A requirement to aid investigations and prosecutions is the accurate identification of the elephant species from which the ivory was removed. We report on the development of the first fully validated multiplex PCR-electrophoresis assay for ivory DNA analysis that can be used as a screening or confirmatory test...
October 18, 2016: Electrophoresis
Álvaro Franco-Giraldo
This article presents a Latin American vision of global health from a counterhegemonic perspective, applicable to various countries of the world in similar circumstances. It begins by reviewing several concepts and trends in global health and outlining the differences between conventional public health, international health, and global health, but without seeing them as antagonistic, instead situating them in a model that is based on global health and also includes the other two disciplines. It is understood that global factors influenced earlier theories, schemes, and models of classic international health...
February 2016: Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública, Pan American Journal of Public Health
Karen Bell
Gender continues to be a relatively marginal issue in environmental justice debates and yet it remains an important aspect of injustice. To help redress the balance, this article explores women's experience of environmental justice through a review of the existing literature and the author's prior qualitative research, as well as her experience of environmental activism. The analysis confirms that women tend to experience inequitable environmental burdens (distributional injustice); and are less likely than men to have control over environmental decisions (procedural injustice), both of which impact on their health (substantive injustice)...
October 12, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Jessica Shaw, Rebecca Campbell, Debi Cain
Prior research has documented the problematic community response to sexual assault: the majority of sexual assaults reported to police are never prosecuted. Social dominance theory suggests that this response is a form of institutional discrimination, intended to maintain existing social structures, and that police personnel likely draw upon shared ideologies to justify their decision-making in sexual assault case investigations. This study drew upon social dominance theory to examine how police justified their investigatory decisions to identify potential leverage points for change...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Community Psychology
Kristi E Gamarel, Larry Brown, Christopher W Kahler, M Isabel Fernandez, Douglas Bruce, Sharon Nichols
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to better understand the prevalence and correlates of substance use behaviors among HIV-infected adolescents in HIV care settings. METHODS: A cross-sectional sample of 2216 youth living with HIV (YLWH; ages 12-26) were recruited through the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV Interventions. Participants completed a one-time survey on sociodemographic factors, substance use and health behaviors. We used logistic regression models to understand the correlates of substance use outcomes...
October 11, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"