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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29163252/the-paradox-of-isochrony-in-the-evolution-of-human-rhythm
#1
Andrea Ravignani, Guy Madison
Isochrony is crucial to the rhythm of human music. Some neural, behavioral and anatomical traits underlying rhythm perception and production are shared with a broad range of species. These may either have a common evolutionary origin, or have evolved into similar traits under different evolutionary pressures. Other traits underlying rhythm are rare across species, only found in humans and few other animals. Isochrony, or stable periodicity, is common to most human music, but isochronous behaviors are also found in many species...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29148040/the-endocranial-shape-of-australopithecus-africanus-surface-analysis-of-the-endocasts-of-sts-5-and-sts-60
#2
Amélie Beaudet, Jean Dumoncel, Frikkie de Beer, Stanley Durrleman, Emmanuel Gilissen, Anna Oettlé, Gérard Subsol, John Francis Thackeray, José Braga
Assessment of global endocranial morphology and regional neuroanatomical changes in early hominins is critical for the reconstruction of evolutionary trajectories of cerebral regions in the human lineage. Early evidence of cortical reorganization in specific local areas (e.g. visual cortex, inferior frontal gyrus) is perceptible in the non-human South African hominin fossil record. However, to date, little information is available regarding potential global changes in the early hominin brain. The introduction of non-invasive imaging techniques opens up new perspectives for the study of hominin brain evolution...
November 16, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29126115/hominid-a-framework-for-identifying-associations-between-host-genetic-variation-and-microbiome-composition
#3
Joshua Lynch, Karen Tang, Sambhawa Priya, Joanna Sands, Margaret Sands, Evan Tang, Sayan Mukherjee, Dan Knights, Ran Blekhman
Recent studies have uncovered a strong effect of host genetic variation on the composition of host-associated microbiota. Here, we present HOMINID, a computational approach based on Lasso linear regression, that given host genetic variation and microbiome taxonomic composition data, identifies host SNPs that are correlated with microbial taxa abundances. Using simulated data we show that HOMINID has accuracy in identifying associated SNPs, and performs better compared to existing methods. We also show that HOMINID can accurately identify the microbial taxa that are correlated with associated SNPs...
November 8, 2017: GigaScience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29109249/hominid-butchers-and-biting-crocodiles-in-the-african-plio-pleistocene
#4
Yonatan Sahle, Sireen El Zaatari, Tim D White
Zooarchaeologists have long relied on linear traces and pits found on the surfaces of ancient bones to infer ancient hominid behaviors such as slicing, chopping, and percussive actions during butchery of mammal carcasses. However, such claims about Plio-Pleistocene hominids rely mostly on very small assemblages of bony remains. Furthermore, recent experiments on trampling animals and biting crocodiles have shown each to be capable of producing mimics of such marks. This equifinality-the creation of similar products by different processes-makes deciphering early archaeological bone assemblages difficult...
November 6, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29103940/morphometric-behavioral-and-genomic-evidence-for-a-new-orangutan-species
#5
Alexander Nater, Maja P Mattle-Greminger, Anton Nurcahyo, Matthew G Nowak, Marc de Manuel, Tariq Desai, Colin Groves, Marc Pybus, Tugce Bilgin Sonay, Christian Roos, Adriano R Lameira, Serge A Wich, James Askew, Marina Davila-Ross, Gabriella Fredriksson, Guillem de Valles, Ferran Casals, Javier Prado-Martinez, Benoit Goossens, Ernst J Verschoor, Kristin S Warren, Ian Singleton, David A Marques, Joko Pamungkas, Dyah Perwitasari-Farajallah, Puji Rianti, Augustine Tuuga, Ivo G Gut, Marta Gut, Pablo Orozco-terWengel, Carel P van Schaik, Jaume Bertranpetit, Maria Anisimova, Aylwyn Scally, Tomas Marques-Bonet, Erik Meijaard, Michael Krützen
Six extant species of non-human great apes are currently recognized: Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, eastern and western gorillas, and chimpanzees and bonobos [1]. However, large gaps remain in our knowledge of fine-scale variation in hominoid morphology, behavior, and genetics, and aspects of great ape taxonomy remain in flux. This is particularly true for orangutans (genus: Pongo), the only Asian great apes and phylogenetically our most distant relatives among extant hominids [1]. Designation of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans, P...
November 20, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29043294/integrating-networks-and-comparative-genomics-reveals-retroelement-proliferation-dynamics-in-hominid-genomes
#6
Orr Levy, Binyamin A Knisbacher, Erez Y Levanon, Shlomo Havlin
Retroelements (REs) are mobile DNA sequences that multiply and spread throughout genomes by a copy-and-paste mechanism. These parasitic elements are active in diverse genomes, from yeast to humans, where they promote diversity, cause disease, and accelerate evolution. Because of their high copy number and sequence similarity, studying their activity and tracking their proliferation dynamics is a challenge. It is particularly difficult to pinpoint the few REs in a genome that are still active in the haystack of degenerate and suppressed elements...
October 2017: Science Advances
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29032037/ecocultural-range-expansion-scenarios-for-the-replacement-or-assimilation-of-neanderthals-by-modern-humans
#7
Joe Yuichiro Wakano, William Gilpin, Seiji Kadowaki, Marcus W Feldman, Kenichi Aoki
Recent archaeological records no longer support a simple dichotomous characterization of the cultures/behaviors of Neanderthals and modern humans, but indicate much cultural/behavioral variability over time and space. Thus, in modeling the replacement or assimilation of Neanderthals by modern humans, it is of interest to consider cultural dynamics and its relation to demographic change. The ecocultural framework for the competition between hominid species allows their carrying capacities to depend on some measure of the levels of culture they possess...
October 12, 2017: Theoretical Population Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29027198/shape-analysis-of-spatial-relationships-between-orbito-ocular-and-endocranial-structures-in-modern-humans-and-fossil-hominids
#8
Ana Sofia Pereira-Pedro, Michael Masters, Emiliano Bruner
The orbits and eyes of modern humans are situated directly below the frontal lobes and anterior to the temporal lobes. Contiguity between these orbital and cerebral elements could generate spatial constraints, and potentially lead to deformation of the eye and reduced visual acuity during development. In this shape analysis we evaluate whether and to what extent covariation exists between ocular morphology and the size and spatial position of the frontal and temporal areas in adult modern humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to investigate patterns of variation among the brain and eyes, while computed tomography (CT) was used to compare cranial morphology in this anatomical region among modern humans, extinct hominids and chimpanzees...
December 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29026075/evidence-of-a-chimpanzee-sized-ancestor-of-humans-but-a-gibbon-sized-ancestor-of-apes
#9
Mark Grabowski, William L Jungers
Body mass directly affects how an animal relates to its environment and has a wide range of biological implications. However, little is known about the mass of the last common ancestor (LCA) of humans and chimpanzees, hominids (great apes and humans), or hominoids (all apes and humans), which is needed to evaluate numerous paleobiological hypotheses at and prior to the root of our lineage. Here we use phylogenetic comparative methods and data from primates including humans, fossil hominins, and a wide sample of fossil primates including Miocene apes from Africa, Europe, and Asia to test alternative hypotheses of body mass evolution...
October 12, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29022796/aural-exostoses-surfer-s-ear-provide-vital-fossil-evidence-of-an-aquatic-phase-in-man-s-early-evolution
#10
P H Rhys Evans, M Cameron
For over a century, otolaryngologists have recognised the condition of aural exostoses, but their significance and aetiology remains obscure, although they tend to be associated with frequent swimming and cold water immersion of the auditory canal. The fact that this condition is usually bilateral is predictable since both ears are immersed in water. However, why do exostoses only grow in swimmers and why do they grow in the deep bony meatus at two or three constant sites? Furthermore, from an evolutionary point of view, what is or was the purpose and function of these rather incongruous protrusions? In recent decades, paleoanthropological evidence has challenged ideas about early hominid evolution...
September 15, 2017: Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28976033/photonic-microhand-with-autonomous-action
#11
Daniele Martella, Sara Nocentini, Dmitry Nuzhdin, Camilla Parmeggiani, Diederik S Wiersma
Grabbing and holding objects at the microscale is a complex function, even for microscopic living animals. Inspired by the hominid-type hand, a microscopic equivalent able to catch microelements is engineered. This microhand is light sensitive and can be either remotely controlled by optical illumination or can act autonomously and grab small particles on the basis of their optical properties. Since the energy is delivered optically, without the need for wires or batteries, the artificial hand can be shrunk down to the micrometer scale...
October 4, 2017: Advanced Materials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28976008/the-genes-of-life-and-death-a-potential-role-for-placental-specific-genes-in-cancer-active-retrotransposons-in-the-placenta-encode-unique-functional-genes-that-may-also-be-used-by-cancer-cells-to-promote-malignancy
#12
REVIEW
Erin C Macaulay, Aniruddha Chatterjee, Xi Cheng, Bruce C Baguley, Michael R Eccles, Ian M Morison
The placenta invades the adjacent uterus and controls the maternal immune system, like a cancer invades surrounding organs and suppresses the local immune response. Intriguingly, placental and cancer cells are globally hypomethylated and share an epigenetic phenomenon that is not well understood - they fail to silence repetitive DNA sequences (retrotransposons) that are silenced (methylated) in healthy somatic cells. In the placenta, hypomethylation of retrotransposons has facilitated the evolution of new genes essential for placental function...
November 2017: BioEssays: News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28947156/bidding-evidence-for-primate-vocal-learning-and-the-cultural-substrates-for-speech-evolution
#13
REVIEW
Adriano R Lameira
Speech evolution seems to defy scientific explanation. Progress on this front has been jammed in an entrenched orthodoxy about what great apes can and (mostly) cannot do vocally, an idea epitomized by the Kuypers/Jürgens hypothesis. Findings by great ape researchers paint, however, starkly different and more optimistic landscapes for speech evolution. Over twenty studies qualify as positive evidence for primate vocal (production) learning following accepted terminology. Additionally, the Kuypers/Jürgens hypothesis shows low etymological, empirical, and theoretical soundness...
September 22, 2017: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28855259/the-mobile-element-locator-tool-melt-population-scale-mobile-element-discovery-and-biology
#14
Eugene J Gardner, Vincent K Lam, Daniel N Harris, Nelson T Chuang, Emma C Scott, W Stephen Pittard, Ryan E Mills, Scott E Devine
Mobile element insertions (MEIs) represent ∼25% of all structural variants in human genomes. Moreover, when they disrupt genes, MEIs can influence human traits and diseases. Therefore, MEIs should be fully discovered along with other forms of genetic variation in whole genome sequencing (WGS) projects involving population genetics, human diseases, and clinical genomics. Here, we describe the Mobile Element Locator Tool (MELT), which was developed as part of the 1000 Genomes Project to perform MEI discovery on a population scale...
November 2017: Genome Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28822066/do-evolutionary-changes-in-astrocytes-contribute-to-the-computational-power-of-the-hominid-brain
#15
Nancy Ann Oberheim Bush, Maiken Nedergaard
It is now well accepted that astrocytes are essential in all major nervous system functions of the rodent brain, including neurotransmission, energy metabolism, modulation of blood flow, ion and water homeostasis, and, indeed, higher cognitive functions, although the contribution of astrocytes in cognition is still in early stages of study. Here we review the most current research findings on human astrocytes, including their structure, molecular characterization, and functional properties. We also highlight novel tools that have been established for translational approaches to the comparative study of astrocytes from humans and experimental animals...
September 2017: Neurochemical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812736/the-evolution-and-population-diversity-of-human-specific-segmental-duplications
#16
Megan Y Dennis, Lana Harshman, Bradley J Nelson, Osnat Penn, Stuart Cantsilieris, John Huddleston, Francesca Antonacci, Kelsi Penewit, Laura Denman, Archana Raja, Carl Baker, Kenneth Mark, Maika Malig, Nicolette Janke, Claudia Espinoza, Holly A F Stessman, Xander Nuttle, Kendra Hoekzema, Tina A Lindsay-Graves, Richard K Wilson, Evan E Eichler
Segmental duplications contribute to human evolution, adaptation and genomic instability but are often poorly characterized. We investigate the evolution, genetic variation and coding potential of human-specific segmental duplications (HSDs). We identify 218 HSDs based on analysis of 322 deeply sequenced archaic and contemporary hominid genomes. We sequence 550 human and nonhuman primate genomic clones to reconstruct the evolution of the largest, most complex regions with protein-coding potential (N = 80 genes from 33 gene families)...
February 17, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28808326/the-importance-of-the-nutritive-value-of-old-bones-in-the-diet-of-bearded-vultures-gypaetus-barbatus
#17
Antoni Margalida, Daniel Villalba
Vultures are central-place foragers and need to optimize their foraging behaviour to offset travel costs by increasing their energy gain. This process is more obvious in certain vulture species that do not feed their young by regurgitation and so must carry food items back to the nest. The Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus is the only species with a bone-diet based. We analysed the chemical composition of bones and the age-related changes in their nutritive value to assess the differences in energy content between bones of differing age, body part and species...
August 14, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28769125/radiocarbon-dating-minute-amounts-of-bone-3-60%C3%A2-mg-with-echomicadas
#18
S Cersoy, A Zazzo, J Rofes, A Tresset, S Zirah, C Gauthier, E Kaltnecker, F Thil, N Tisnerat-Laborde
Because hard tissues can be radiocarbon dated, they are key to establishing the archaeological chronologies, palaeoenvironmental reconstructions and historical-biogeographical processes of the last 50,000 years. The advent of accelerator mass spectrometers (AMS) has revolutionized the field of archaeology but routine AMS dating still requires 60-200 mg of bone, which far exceeds that of small vertebrates or remains which hold a patrimonial value (e.g. hominid remains or worked bone artefacts). Here, we present the first radiocarbon dates obtained from minute amounts of bone (3-60 mg) using a MIni CArbon DAting System (MICADAS)...
August 2, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28710361/the-dental-phenotype-of-hairless-dogs-with-foxi3-haploinsufficiency
#19
Kornelius Kupczik, Alexander Cagan, Silke Brauer, Martin S Fischer
Hairless dog breeds show a form of ectodermal dysplasia characterised by a lack of hair and abnormal tooth morphology. This has been attributed to a semi-dominant 7-base-pair duplication in the first exon of the forkhead box I3 gene (FOXI3) shared by all three breeds. Here, we identified this FOXI3 variant in a historical museum sample of pedigreed hairless dog skulls by using ancient DNA extraction and present the associated dental phenotype. Unlike in the coated wild type dogs, the hairless dogs were characterised in both the mandibular and maxillary dentition by a loss of the permanent canines, premolars and to some extent incisors...
July 14, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28706072/ravens-parallel-great-apes-in-flexible-planning-for-tool-use-and-bartering
#20
Can Kabadayi, Mathias Osvath
The ability to flexibly plan for events outside of the current sensory scope is at the core of being human and is crucial to our everyday lives and society. Studies on apes have shaped a belief that this ability evolved within the hominid lineage. Corvids, however, have shown evidence of planning their food hoarding, although this has been suggested to reflect a specific caching adaptation rather than domain-general planning. Here, we show that ravens plan for events unrelated to caching-tool-use and bartering-with delays of up to 17 hours, exert self-control, and consider temporal distance to future events...
July 14, 2017: Science
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