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Emergency and internal medicine

Ismael Apud, Oriol Romaní
Ayahuasca is a psychoactive beverage from the Amazon, traditionally used by indigenous and mestizo populations in the region. Widespread international use of the beverage began in the 1990s in both secular contexts and religious/spiritual networks. This article offers an analysis of these networks as health care systems in general and for the case of Spain and specifically Catalonia, describing the emergence and characteristics of their groups, and the therapeutic itineraries of some participants. The medical anthropology perspective we take enables us to reflect on the relationship between medicine and religion, and problematize the tensions between medicalization and medical pluralism...
October 18, 2016: International Journal on Drug Policy
Outi Laatikainen, Sami Sneck, Risto Bloigu, Minna Lahtinen, Timo Lauri, Miia Turpeinen
Adverse drug events (ADEs) are more likely to affect geriatric patients due to physiological changes occurring with aging. Even though this is an internationally recognized problem, similar research data in Finland is still lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the number of geriatric medication-related hospitalizations in the Finnish patient population and to discover the potential means of recognizing patients particularly at risk of ADEs. The study was conducted retrospectively from the 2014 emergency department patient records in Oulu University Hospital...
2016: Frontiers in Pharmacology
Bhakti Hansoti, Adam Levine, Latha Ganti, Rockefeller Oteng, Taylor DesRosiers, Payal Modi, Jeremy Brown
BACKGROUND: Funding for global health has grown significantly over the past two decades. Numerous funding opportunities for international development and research work exist; however, they can be difficult to navigate. The 2013 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on global health and emergency care identified the need to strengthen global emergency care research funding, solidify existing funding streams, and expand funding sources. RESULTS: This piece focuses on the various federal funding opportunities available to support emergency physicians conducting international research from seed funding to large institutional grants...
December 2016: International Journal of Emergency Medicine
Lukas K Schoenenberger, Steffen Bayer, John P Ansah, David B Matchar, Rajagopal L Mohanavalli, Sean Sw Lam, Marcus Eh Ong
OBJECTIVES: Emergency Department crowding is a serious and international health care problem that seems to be resistant to most well intended but often reductionist policy approaches. In this study, we examine Emergency Department crowding in Singapore from a systems thinking perspective using causal loop diagramming to visualize the systemic structure underlying this complex phenomenon. Furthermore, we evaluate the relative impact of three different policies in reducing Emergency Department crowding in Singapore: introduction of geriatric emergency medicine, expansion of emergency medicine training, and implementation of enhanced primary care...
2016: SAGE Open Medicine
Bayan Sharif-Chan, Dipti Tankala, Christine Leong, Zubin Austin, Marisa Battistella
Objective. To compare peer teaching in a medical and a pharmacy clinical teaching unit and to provide suggestions for future research in pharmacy near-peer teaching. Methods. This exploratory observational study used principles of ethnographic methodology for data collection and analysis. Observations were collected in a large downtown teaching hospital. An average of 4-6 hours per day were spent observing a team of medical trainees from the Faculty (School) of Medicine in the general internal medicine (unit for two weeks, followed by a team of pharmacy trainees in an ambulatory hemodialysis (HD) unit for two weeks...
September 25, 2016: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Kim Tran, Chaim Bell, Nathan Stall, George Tomlinson, Allison McGeer, Andrew Morris, Michael Gardam, Howard B Abrams
BACKGROUND: Isolation precautions have negative effects on patient safety, psychological well-being, and healthcare worker contact. However, it is not known whether isolation precautions affect certain hospital-related outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of isolation precautions on hospital-related outcomes and cost of care. DESIGN: Retrospective, propensity-score matched cohort study of inpatients admitted to general internal medicine (GIM) services at three academic hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada between January 2010 and December 2012...
October 17, 2016: Journal of General Internal Medicine
Thomas Sené, Olivier Lidove, Joel Sebbah, Jean-Marc Darondel, Hervé Picard, Laurent Aaron, Olivier Fain, Thierry Zenone, Dominique Joly, Philippe Charron, Jean-Marc Ziza
The incidence and predictive factors of arrhythmias and/or conduction abnormalities (ACAs) requiring cardiac device (CD) implantation are poorly characterized in Fabry disease (FD). The aim of our retrospective study was to determine the prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with ACA requiring CD implantation in a monocentric cohort of patients with confirmed FD who were followed up in a department of internal medicine and reference center for FD.Forty-nine patients (20M, 29F) were included. Nine patients (4M, 5F; 18%) had at least one episode of ACA leading to device therapy...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
V Morelli, A Scillitani, M Arosio, I Chiodini
Recently, the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) published new guidelines on the management of adrenal incidentalomas. At the same time Lopez and coworkers published on the Annals of Internal Medicine an important study showing that even patients with non-functioning adrenal tumors have an increased risk of incident diabetes. In consideration of previous data and of the results of the study of Lopez and coworkers, some points emerge from the ESE Guidelines that deserve attention. Firstly, it must be observed that the term "autonomous cortisol secretion," introduced by the ESE Panel in the place of the commonly used "subclinical hypercortisolism," seems questionable, since the guidelines do not suggest determining the adrenocorticotroph hormone levels that could give the certain proof of a truly autonomous cortisol secretion...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation
Charles A Mkony, Ephata E Kaaya, Alex J Goodell, Sarah B Macfarlane
BACKGROUND: Faced with one of the lowest physician-to-population ratios in the world, the Government of Tanzania is urging its medical schools to train more physicians. The annual number of medical students admitted across the country rose from 55 in the 1990s to 1,680 approved places for the 2015/16 academic year. These escalating numbers strain existing faculty. OBJECTIVE: To describe the availability of faculty in medical schools in Tanzania. DESIGN: We identified faculty lists published on the Internet by five Tanzanian medical schools for the 2011/12 academic year and analyzed the appointment status, rank, discipline, and qualifications of faculty members...
2016: Global Health Action
Manuel Monti, Giovanni Maria Vincentelli, Giuseppe Murdolo, Giuliano Bertazzoni, Francesco Rocco Pugliese, Francesco Borgognoni, Maria Pia Ruggieri, Raffaele Landolfi
INTRODUCTION: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the third most common cardiovascular illness after acute coronary syndrome and stroke and and the most common preventable cause of hospital-related death. Several studies have demonstrated a significant reduction of fatal pulmonary embolism attributed to the introduction of thromboprophylactic measures and changes in hospital practices. However, the influence of some demographical variables, especially age, has largely been under appreciated...
September 2016: Recenti Progressi in Medicina
Jairo A Diaz, Mauricio F Murillo, Jhonan A Mendoza, Ana M Barreto, Lina S Poveda, Lina K Sanchez, Laura C Poveda, Katherine T Mora
Emergent biological responses develop via unknown processes dependent on physical collision. In hypoxia, when the tissue architecture collapses but the geometric core is stable, actin cytoskeleton filament components emerge, revealing a hidden internal order that identifies how each molecule is reassembled into the original mold, using one common connection, i.e., a fractal self-similarity that guides the system from the beginning in reverse metamorphosis, with spontaneous self-assembly of past forms that mimics an embryoid phenotype...
2016: American Journal of Stem Cells
Fang Wei, Weiguo Wang, Yudao Ma, Chen-Ho Tung, Zhenghu Xu
Copper(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is an essential "click chemistry" reaction that is widely used in chemical biology, medicinal chemistry and materials science. The CuAAC reaction of terminal alkynes provides a mild and efficient synthesis of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles. However, the click reaction of internal alkynes with azides, giving trisubstituted triazoles, is very challenging. This feature article highlights the recent progress addressing this fundamental problem. Particular emphasis is on the current and emerging strategies to introduce functional groups to the C-5 position of triazoles in a regioselective manner...
October 3, 2016: Chemical Communications: Chem Comm
Emily Gowland, Karen Le Ball, Catherine Bryant, Jonathan Birns
Acute care common stem acute medicine (ACCS AM) training was designed to develop competent multi-skilled acute physicians to manage patients with multimorbidity from 'door to discharge' in an era of increasing acute hospital admissions. Recent surveys by the Royal College of Physicians have suggested that acute medical specialties are proving less attractive to trainees. However, data on the career pathways taken by trainees completing core acute medical training has been lacking. Using London as a region with a 100% fill rate for its ACCS AM training programme, this study showed only 14% of trainees go on to higher specialty training in acute internal medicine and a further 10% to pursue higher medical specialty training with dual accreditation with internal medicine...
October 2016: Clinical Medicine: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London
Maria Baudin, Ammar M Jumaa, Huda J E Jomma, Mubarak S Karsany, Göran Bucht, Jonas Näslund, Clas Ahlm, Magnus Evander, Nahla Mohamed
BACKGROUND: Rift Valley fever virus is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that causes infections in animals and human beings in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever lead to mass abortions in livestock, but such abortions have not been identified in human beings. Our aim was to investigate the cause of miscarriages in febrile pregnant women in an area endemic for Rift Valley fever. METHODS: Pregnant women with fever of unknown origin who attended the governmental hospital of Port Sudan, Sudan, between June 30, 2011, and Nov 17, 2012, were sampled at admission and included in this cross-sectional study...
November 2016: Lancet Global Health
Q Lam, E Ajzner, C A Campbell, A Young
Direct communication of significant (often life-threatening) results is a universally acknowledged role of the pathology laboratory, and an important contributor to patient safety. Amongst the findings of a recent survey of 871 laboratories from 30 countries by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM), only 3 tests were noted to be common to 90% of alert lists, and only 48% of laboratories consulted clinicians in developing these alert lists despite ISO15189 recommendations to do so...
February 2016: EJIFCC
Swathi Iyengar, Lisa Hedman, Gilles Forte, Suzanne Hill
Shortages of medicines and vaccines have been reported in countries of all income levels in recent years. Shortages can result from one or multiple causes, including shortages of raw materials, manufacturing capacity problems, industry consolidation, marketing practices, and procurement and supply chain management. Existing approaches to mitigate shortages include advance notice systems managed through medicine regulatory authorities, special programmes that track medicines, and interventions to improve efficiency of the medicine supply chain...
September 29, 2016: BMC Medicine
P Yan, F Y Li, Y Yang, Y N Wang, A M Huang, H Yao
Objective: To investigate the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in nurses in Xinjiang, China, to analyze the influencing factors for the development of WMSDs, and to provide a reference for the prevention and treatment of WMSDs in nurses. Methods: Stratified cluster sampling was used to randomly select 8 422 nurses in 8 tertiary hospitals and 4 secondary hospitals in Xinjiang from January to October, 2015. A questionnaire survey was performed to investigate the prevalence of WMSDs in nurses from departments of internal medicine, surgery, gynecology, pediatrics, emergency, and intensive care and operating rooms and analyze related influencing factors...
August 20, 2016: Chinese Journal of Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Diseases
Nicolaus W Glomb, Manish I Shah, Andrea T Cruz
BACKGROUND: There is global variation in the ability of hospital-based emergency centres to provide paediatric emergency medicine (PEM) services. Although minimum standards have been proposed, they may not be applicable in resource-limited settings. OBJECTIVE: The goal was to identify reasonable minimum standards to provide safe and effective care for acutely ill children in resource-limited settings. METHODS: Using previously proposed standards from the International Federation of Emergency Medicine (IFEM), a modified Delphi approach was used to reach agreement regarding minimum standards for PEM in resource-limited settings...
September 29, 2016: Paediatrics and International Child Health
Sejal H Patel, Sunju Park, Jamie B Rosenberg
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare pediatric and adult ophthalmology consultations in an urban academic center. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients evaluated by the ophthalmology consultation service from January through June 2014 was conducted. RESULTS: A total of 751 inpatients and emergency department patients were evaluated by the ophthalmology consultation service, of whom 152 (20.4%) were children and 598 (79...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
W W He, Y J Chu
Objective: To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of temporary heart pacemaker for emergency treatment of patients with acute and severe cardiovascular diseases. Methods: The clinical data of 147 patients with cardiac arrest or bradyarrhythmia from August 2007 to December 2015, was analyzed retrospectively in Department of internal and Emergency Medicine, People's Hospital of Henan. Based on the rescue methods, all patients were divided into two groups: observation group (80 cases, among whom, 49 cases with cardiac arrest and 31 cases with bradyarrhythmia) and control group (67 cases, among whom 39 cases with cardiac arrest and 28 cases with bradyarrhythmia)...
September 6, 2016: Zhonghua Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese medical journal]
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