Read by QxMD icon Read

health care access

Krystin A Engelhardt, Elizabeth Hisle-Gorman, Gregory H Gorman, Nicole R Dobson
Background: The Military Health System (MHS) provides universal access to medical care to active duty service members, retirees, and their dependents. Observational data from small studies suggest lower preterm birth rates in the MHS compared with U.S. national averages. The objectives of this study are to determine the rate of preterm birth in the MHS from 2006 to 2012 compared with national rates and to analyze the impact of demographic factors on preterm birth in a universal access health care system...
March 14, 2018: Military Medicine
Kouta Suzuki, Hidehito Niimura, Ryoko Yamazawa, Takahiro Nemoto, Masaaki Murakami, Masaru Mimura, Masafumi Mizuno
INTRODUCTION: In recent years, the early detection and treatment of the first episode of schizophrenia (FES) has attracted worldwide attention. In Japan, psychiatric care has changed to an open and accessible framework over the past decade. Therefore, the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is thought to have been shortened. The purposes of this study were to investigate whether recent DUP periods are shorter than they were 10 years ago and whether the DUP at present differs among psychiatric facilities...
March 7, 2018: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Andrew McDowell, Neeraj Raizada, Sunil D Khaparde, Raghuram Rao, Sanjay Sarin, Aakshi Kalra, Virender Singh Salhotra, Sreenivas Achuthan Nair, Catharina Boehme, Claudia M Denkinger
BACKGROUND: Diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in children presents considerable challenges. Upfront testing on Xpert® MTB/RIF ('Xpert')-a rapid molecular assay with high sensitivity and specificity-for pediatric presumptive TB patients, as recommended by India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP), can pave the way for early TB diagnosis. As part of an ongoing project implemented by Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) dedicated to providing upfront free-of-cost (FOC) Xpert testing to children seeking care in the public and private sectors, a qualitative assessment was designed to understand how national guidelines on TB diagnosis and Xpert technology have been integrated into the pediatric TB care practices of different health providers...
2018: PloS One
David A Watters, Glenn D Guest, Viliami Tangi, Mark G Shrime, John G Meara
Progress in achieving "universal access to safe, affordable surgery, and anesthesia care when needed" is dependent on consensus not only about the key messages but also on what metrics should be used to set goals and measure progress. The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery not only achieved consensus on key messages but also recommended 6 key metrics to inform national surgical plans and monitor scale-up toward 2030. These metrics measure access to surgery, as well as its timeliness, safety, and affordability: (1) Two-hour access to the 3 Bellwether procedures (cesarean delivery, emergency laparotomy, and management of an open fracture); (2) Surgeon, Anesthetist, and Obstetrician workforce >20/100,000; (3) Surgical volume of 5000 procedures/100,000; (4) Reporting of perioperative mortality rate; and (5 and 6) Risk rates of catastrophic expenditure and impoverishment when requiring surgery...
April 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Fauzia A Khan, Alan F Merry
The safety of anesthesia characteristic of high-income countries today is not matched in low-resource settings with poor infrastructure, shortages of anesthesia providers, essential drugs, equipment, and supplies. Health care is delivered through complex systems. Achieving sustainable widespread improvement globally will require an understanding of how to influence such systems. Health outcomes depend not only on a country's income, but also on how resources are allocated, and both vary substantially, between and within countries...
April 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Søren Kudsk-Iversen, Naomi Shamambo, M Dylan Bould
The majority of the world's population lacks access to safe, timely, and affordable surgical care. Although there is a health workforce crisis across the board in the poorest countries in the world, anesthesia is disproportionally affected. This article explores some of the key issues that must be tackled to strengthen the anesthesia workforce in low- and lower-middle-income countries. First, we need to increase the overall number of safe anesthesia providers to match a huge burden of disease, particularly in the poorest countries in the world and in remote and rural areas...
April 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Ganbold Lundeg, Amanda Baric, David C Pescod, Keith Pescod
Anesthesia in Mongolia has undergone a period of major development over the past 17 years, thanks to the work of the Mongolian Society of Anesthesiologists (MSA) and the support of the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists and the Australian Society of Anaesthetists. The specialty has made major advances in training and in its standing among medical specialties in Mongolia. The MSA has produced members who are leaders in the development of anesthesia as well as emergency medicine and critical care...
April 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
C Roger Goucke, Pongparadee Chaudakshetrin
Approximately 80% of the world's population lives in countries with little or no access to pain management. These countries also have 74% of the world's deaths from cancer and human immunodeficiency virus. Appropriate use of oral opioids can control 80%-90% of cancer pain. However, only 6.7% of the world's medical opioids are available in these low-resource countries. With the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery calling for a significant expansion of surgical services, postoperative pain management will need to be an increasing focus of our attention...
April 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Morgan Pommells, Corinne Schuster-Wallace, Susan Watt, Zachariah Mulawa
The purpose of this study was to better understand the gender violence risks that exist in communities where poor water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) access is a known problem. Focus groups and key informant interviews were used to capture the lived experiences of community and health care practitioners from Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya. This article provides lived narratives of the various cultural and environmental conditions leading to assaults directly attributable to inadequate WaSH. The results shed light on the complex intersections between water access and violence and have significant implications for achieving gender equity and universal access to WaSH...
March 1, 2018: Violence Against Women
Lesley Uttley, Iñigo Bermejo, Shijie Ren, Marrissa Martyn-St James, Ruth Wong, David L Scott, Adam Young, Matt Stevenson
As part of its Single Technology Appraisal process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer (Pfizer) of tofacitinib (TOF; Xeljanz® ) to submit evidence of the drug's clinical and cost-effectiveness in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after the failure of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs). The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG)...
March 15, 2018: PharmacoEconomics
Gregory Fant, Lisa Backus
Introduction: It is important to monitor the use of optometric services by Veterans and consider the implications for other optometric and vision rehabilitation services. We did not find public health reports documenting the recent utilization of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) optometric eye exam services. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used in this secondary data analysis report. We were interested in reporting on the number of Veterans using the VHA system with at least one VHA optometric eye exam service in 2014, 2015, or 2016 within a VHA optometry clinic...
March 13, 2018: Military Medicine
Ebele M Umeukeje, Marcus G Wild, Saugar Maripuri, Teresa Davidson, Margaret Rutherford, Khaled Abdel-Kader, Julia Lewis, Consuelo H Wilkins, Kerri Cavanaugh
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Incidence of ESKD is three times higher in black Americans than in whites, and CKD prevalence continues to rise among black Americans. Community-based kidney disease screening may increase early identification and awareness of black Americans at risk, but it is challenging to implement. This study aimed to identify participants' perspectives of community kidney disease screening. The Health Belief Model provides a theoretic framework for conceptualization of these perspectives and optimization of community kidney disease screening activities...
March 15, 2018: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: CJASN
Ignacio Aznar-Lou, Anton Pottegård, Ana Fernández, María Teresa Peñarrubia-María, Antoni Serrano-Blanco, Ramón Sabés-Figuera, Montserrat Gil-Girbau, Marta Fajó-Pascual, Patricia Moreno-Peral, Maria Rubio-Valera
OBJECTIVE: Copayment policies aim to reduce the burden of medication expenditure but may affect adherence and generate inequities in access to healthcare. The objective was to evaluate the impact of two copayment measures on initial medication non-adherence (IMNA) in several medication groups and by income level. DESIGN: A population-based study was conducted using real-world evidence. SETTING: Primary care in Catalonia (Spain) where two separate copayment measures (fixed copayment and coinsurance) were introduced between 2011 and 2013...
March 15, 2018: BMJ Quality & Safety
Emily M Ko, Laura J Havrilesky, Ronald D Alvarez, Oliver Zivanovic, Leslie R Boyd, Elizabeth L Jewell, Patrick F Timmins, Randall S Gibb, Anuja Jhingran, David E Cohn, Sean C Dowdy, Matthew A Powell, Eva Chalas, Yongmei Huang, Jill Rathbun, Jason D Wright
Health care in the United States is in the midst of a significant transformation from a "fee for service" to a "fee for value" based model. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 has only accelerated this transition. Anticipating these reforms, the Society of Gynecologic Oncology developed the Future of Physician Payment Reform Task Force (PPRTF) in 2015 to develop strategies to ensure fair value based reimbursement policies for gynecologic cancer care. The PPRTF elected as a first task to develop an Alternative Payment Model for thesurgical management of low risk endometrial cancer...
March 12, 2018: Gynecologic Oncology
Amin A Ramzan, Stacy Fischer, Mary K Buss, Renata R Urban, Bruce Patsner, Linda R Duska, Christine M Fisher, Carolyn Lefkowits
As the only oncologists that provide both medical and surgical care, gynecologic oncologists encounter an exceptionally broad range of indications for prescribing opioids in clinical situations ranging from management of acute post-operative pain to chronic cancer-related pain to end-of-life care. While opioids are essential to the practice of gynecologic oncology, they can also have significant side effects and can be misused. Due to the explosive growth of opioid prescriptions and opioid-related overdoses and deaths during the first decade of the 21st century, there has been a recent concerted public health effort to prevent and treat opioid misuse through both legislation and education [1]...
March 12, 2018: Gynecologic Oncology
Donald M Hilty, Terry Rabinowitz, Robert M McCarron, David J Katzelnick, Trina Chang, Amy M Bauer, John Fortney
INTRODUCTION: In this era of patient-centered care, telepsychiatry (TP; video or synchronous) provides quality care with outcomes as good as in-person care, facilitates access to care, and leverages a wide range of treatments at a distance. METHOD: This conceptual review article explores TP as applied to newer models of care (e.g., collaborative, stepped, and integrated care). RESULTS: The field of psychosomatic medicine (PSM) has developed clinical care models, educates interdisciplinary team members, and provides leadership to clinical teams...
December 26, 2017: Psychosomatics
Elan Lazuardi, Stephen Bell, Christy E Newman
Background: The Indonesian response to HIV has been informed largely by quantitative evidence. This review examines what is known about the Indonesian HIV care cascade from published qualitative research. Methods: A 'scoping review' method was used to synthesise and interpret the findings of 17 eligible peer-reviewed publications. Results: Qualitative findings are reported in relation to two themes. Factors influencing successful engagement include a lack of HIV-related knowledge among clients, fear of stigma or lack of privacy/confidentiality at services, limited accessibility and affordability, and poor linkages between services...
March 16, 2018: Sexual Health
David Veale
In 2012, the coalition government introduced the legal right for National Health Service (NHS) patients in England to choose their mental healthcare provider for out-patient treatment. This was a significant step towards parity of care between mental and physical ill health, and NHS Improvement and NHS England have provided sensible guidance on its implementation. However, several factors prevent the system from working as it was intended: lack of awareness of the principle of patient choice for out-patient treatment; complacency from some trusts and commissioners; mental health trusts operating outside the e-referrals system; misuse of care pathways; lack of direct access by many general practitioners for out-of-area referrals; and delays in authorisation for funding...
April 2018: BJPsych Bulletin
Minerva Kyei-Onanjiri, Mary Carolan-Olah, John Koku Awoonor-Williams, Terence V McCann
BACKGROUND: Maternal morbidity and mortality is most prevalent in resource-poor settings such as sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia. In sub-Saharan Africa, Ghana is one of the countries still facing particular challenges in reducing its maternal morbidity and mortality. Access to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) interventions has been identified as a means of improving maternal health outcomes. Assessing the range of interventions provided in health facilities is, therefore, important in determining capacity to treat obstetric emergencies...
March 15, 2018: BMC Health Services Research
Abdulwahab A Alkhamis
BACKGROUND: Insufficient knowledge of health insurance benefits could be associated with lack of access to health care, particularly for minority populations. This study aims to assess the association between expatriates' knowledge of health insurance benefits and lack of access to health care. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was conducted from March 2015 to February 2016 among 3398 insured male expatriates in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The dependent variable was binary and expresses access or lack of access to health care...
March 15, 2018: BMC Public Health
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"