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Anal sphincter injury

K Kuismanen, K Nieminen, K Karjalainen, K Lehto, J Uotila
BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the subjective outcome of primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) at 6 months, the factors associated with the symptoms of anal incontinence (AI), and the role of a simple survey consisting in one question with three answer choices, combined with the Wexner incontinence score for the assessment of this patient population. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients with third- or fourth-degree OASIS operated on between January 2007 and December 2013 inclusive at Tampere University Hospital, Finland...
March 15, 2018: Techniques in Coloproctology
Marie-Louise Marschalek, Christof Worda, Lorenz Kuessel, Heinz Koelbl, Willi Oberaigner, Hermann Leitner, Julian Marschalek, Heinrich Husslein
BACKGROUND: In view of the reported increase in obstetric anal sphincter injuries, the objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of such injuries over time and the associated risk and protective factors. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study from a national database of 168 137 primiparous women with term, singleton, cephalic, vaginal delivery between 2008 and 2014. The main outcome measure was obstetric anal sphincter injury. A multivariate regression model was used to identify risk and protective factors...
March 14, 2018: Birth
Maria Lindqvist, Margareta Persson, Margareta Nilsson, Eva Uustal, Inger Lindberg
OBJECTIVE: this study explores women's experiences of the first two months after obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) during childbirth with a focus on problematic recovery. METHODS: this qualitative study used inductive qualitative content analysis to investigate open-ended responses from 1248 women. The data consists of short and comprehensive written responses to open-ended questions focusing on recovery in the national quality register, the Perineal Laceration Register, two months after OASIS at childbirth...
February 20, 2018: Midwifery
Sandeep Singh, Balram Bhargava, Padma Vasantha, Rohit Bhatia, Hanish Sharma, Sujoy Pal, Peush Sahni, Govind K Makharia
PURPOSE: The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a stool management kit (SMK) for containment of fecal incontinence in hospitalized bedridden patients. DESIGN: A single-group quasi-experimental study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: Twenty bedridden adults who had at least 1 episode of fecal incontinence in the prior 24 hours participated in the study. The study setting was the neurological unit of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi, India...
March 2018: Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing
Xiaojia Li, Xiutian Guo, Weiqi Jin, Jingen Lu
BACKGROUND: Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and acupuncture are known to mitigate tissue damage. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of combined electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation and BMSC injection in a rat model of anal sphincter injury-induced faecal incontinence (FI). METHODS: 60 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham-operated control, FI, FI+EA, FI+BMSC, and FI+BMSC+EA. The anorectal tissues were collected on days 1, 3, 7 and 14...
March 8, 2018: Acupuncture in Medicine: Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society
Bertrand Gachon, Marion Desgranges, Laetitia Fradet, Arnaud Decatoire, Florian Poireault, Fabrice Pierre, Xavier Fritel, David Desseauve
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Increased ligamentous laxity is associated with pelvic floor distension in pregnant women. This considered, it may also be related to the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI). Our objective was to assess the association among increased ligamentous laxity, perineal tear severity, and OASI occurrence. METHODS: This is a prospective study. We assessed ligamentous laxity between the 36th week of pregnancy and the onset of labor, by measuring the passive extension of the nondominant index finger for a 0...
March 7, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
Hege Hølmo Johannessen, Signe Nilssen Stafne, Ragnhild Sørum Falk, Arvid Stordahl, Arne Wibe, Siv Mørkved
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Urinary (UI) and anal incontinence (AI) are common pelvic floor disorders (PFD), and postpartum women experiencing double incontinence (DI), the combination of UI and AI, tend to have more severe symptoms and a greater impact on quality of life. Our objective was to investigate the prevalence and predictors of postpartum DI and UI alone 1 year after first delivery. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, 976 women reported the prevalence of DI and UI alone 1 year after their first delivery in one of two hospitals in Norway using the St Marks score and the ICI-Q UI SF...
March 2, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
X Fritel, B Gachon, D Desseauve, T Thubert
Our main objectives were to identify risk factors, methods for early diagnosis, and prevention of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIs), using a literature review. The main risk factors for OASIs are nulliparity, instrumental delivery, posterior presentation, median episiotomy, prolonged second phase of labor and fetal macrosomia. Asian origin, short ano-vulvar distance, ligamentous hyperlaxity, lack of expulsion control, non-visualization of the perineum or maneuvers for shoulder dystocia also appear to be risk factors...
February 27, 2018: Gynecologie, Obstetrique, Fertilite & Senologie
P Tirumanisetty, D Prichard, J G Fletcher, S Chakraborty, A R Zinsmeister, A E Bharucha
BACKGROUND: Endoanal MRI and MR defecography are used to identify anal sphincter injury and disordered defecation. However, few studies have evaluated findings in asymptomatic healthy people. The effects of BMI and parity on rectoanal motion and evacuation are unknown. METHODS: In 113 asymptomatic females (age 50 ± 17 years, Mean ± SD) without risk factors for anorectal trauma, anal sphincter appearance, anorectal motion, and pelvic organ prolapse were evaluated with MRI...
March 2, 2018: Neurogastroenterology and Motility: the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
Jouko Pirhonen, Ellen Samuelsson, Tiina Pirhonen, Anders Odeback, Mika Gissler
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the ability of an intensive interventional program to decrease the number of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), while simultaneously decreasing the rate of Caesarean sections (CS). STUDY DESIGN: The intervention, which aimed at decreasing the number of OASIS, started with a compulsory tutorial for all the midwives and physicians. At the same time, the clinic initiated a program to decrease the number of CS. We compared the outcomes before and after the intervention by calculating the risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals...
February 21, 2018: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
Vita Začesta, Dace Rezeberga, Haralds Plaudis, Kristina Drusany-Staric, Corrado Cescon
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Mediolateral episiotomy is one of the most frequent surgical interventions performed in obstetrics. There is conflicting evidence as to whether mediolateral episiotomy reduces the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASI). Recent studies suggest that functional asymmetry of pelvic floor innervation exists in healthy women and is strongly associated with postpartum incontinence when the trauma occurs on the dominant side of innervation. Mediolateral episiotomy is the most common cause of perineal trauma during delivery, and the surgical incision is usually performed on the mediolateral right side...
February 26, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
You Maria Wu, Natalia McInnes, Yvonne Leong
OBJECTIVES: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is often recommended to treat postpartum urinary incontinence (UI). However, the role of postpartum PFMT in pelvic organ prolapse (POP), sexual function, and anal incontinence (AI) remains unclear. We therefore aim to assess the efficacy of postpartum PFMT on these pelvic floor disorders. METHODS: This study is a meta-analysis consisting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PEDro...
March 2018: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Jennifer Yeung, Anna Stecher, Catrina C Crisp, Donna Mazloomdoost, Benjamin Smith, Steven D Kleeman, Rachel N Pauls
OBJECTIVES: Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASISs) are a devastating postpartum complication; reducing rates is paramount to improving quality of care. In Norway, implementation of a perineal protection program decreased the incidence of OASIS by 48%. We sought to assess impact on OASIS rates following a similar program. METHODS: This institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study was performed in an academic hospital system. The periods of analysis were November 2014 through October 2015 for the preintervention arm and November 2015 through October 2016 for the postintervention arm...
March 2018: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Susan A Barr, Catrina C Crisp, Amanda B White, Shazia A Malik, Kimberly Kenton
OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to identify screening, treatment, and referral practices of primary care physicians (PCPs) for patients with pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) and evaluate awareness of the Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS) subspecialty. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of PCPs using a random sample of 1005 American College of Physicians members, stratified by demographic region. Electronic survey content included awareness of FPMRS certification, comfort diagnosing and treating PFDs, and PFD referral patterns for PCPs...
March 2018: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Pina Amin, Summia Zaher, Richard Penketh, Sobha Cherian, Rachel E Collis, Julia Sanders, Kiron Bhal
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate caesarean section (CS) rates and moderate to severe hypoxaemic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) rates with other core intra-partum outcomes following reconfiguration of maternity services in Cardiff, South Wales, UK. DESIGN: Cohort study of births from 2006 to 2015. SETTINGS: A University tertiary referral centre for foetal and maternal medicine with 6000 births/year, University Hospital of Wales, United Kingdom. METHOD: Data relating to births from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2015 were extracted from the computerized maternity database on a yearly basis...
February 19, 2018: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
William H Donovan
The examination of the sensation of the anal orifice and the contraction of the external anal sphincter, either voluntarily or reflexly, has always been an integral part of the International Standards for Neurologic Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI). Yet the importance of this component has been defended and challenged. This paper compares these two points of view as expressed by Previnaire and Marino, respectively. Both authors make important points but as the papers do not address the same aspect of the anal exam, room for further refinement of ISNCSCI both regarding the details of the exam and the use of components of the exam for prognostication of neurologic recovery is apparent...
2018: Spinal Cord Series and Cases
Jean Gabriel Previnaire
The BCR consists of the contraction of the bulbocavernosus muscle in response to squeezing the glans penis or clitoris, and is mediated through the pudendal nerve. In case of a complete lesion, the presence of BCR is indicative of intact S2-S4 spinal reflex arcs and loss of supraspinal inhibition, determining an upper motor neuron (UMN) lesion, its absence a lower motor neuron (LMN) lesion. The BCR further helps distinguish conus medullaris from cauda equina syndromes. Sensory or motor function in the most caudal sacral segments, not BCR, defines the sacral sparing as part of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI)...
2018: Spinal Cord Series and Cases
Francisco J Orejuela, Rajshi Gandhi, Lauren Mack, Wesley Lee, Haleh Sangi-Haghpeykar, Hans P Dietz, Susan M Ramin
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective was to assess the safety and feasibility of using a pelvic floor dilator during active labor to prevent injuries to the levator ani muscle (LAM) and perineum. METHODS: In a prospective pilot study, a pelvic floor dilator using soft pads was introduced into the vaginal canal to gradually expand the vagina, in 30 nulliparous women and in 10 controls. The primary outcomes were adverse events related to the device. Secondary outcomes were perineal lacerations after delivery, sonographically defined levator ani injury, hiatal area dimensions, and anal sphincter disruption, all at 12-20 weeks postpartum, and maximum pelvic floor dilation, time to achieve maximum dilation, and device retention rate...
February 6, 2018: International Urogynecology Journal
Jacobo Trébol, Tihomir Georgiev-Hristov, Luz Vega-Clemente, Ignacio García-Gómez, Ana Carabias-Orgaz, Mariano García-Arranz, Damián García-Olmo
AIM: To establish a rat model of anal sphincter injury and test different systems to provide stem cells to injured area. METHODS: Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) were isolated from BDIX rats and were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) for cell tracking. Biosutures (sutures covered with ASCs) were prepared with 1.5 x 10 6 GFP-ASCs, and solutions of 10 6 GFP-ASCs in normal saline were prepared for injection. Anorectal normal anatomy was studied on Wistar and BDIX female rats...
January 26, 2018: World Journal of Stem Cells
Kirsi Kuismanen, Miia Juntunen, Nathaniel Narra Girish, Heikki Tuominen, Heini Huhtala, Kari Nieminen, Jari Hyttinen, Susanna Miettinen
Anal incontinence is a devastating condition that significantly reduces the quality of life. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of human adipose stem cell (hASC) injections in a rat model for anal sphincter injury, which is the main cause of anal incontinence in humans. Furthermore, we tested if the efficacy of hASCs could be improved by combining them with polyacrylamide hydrogel carrier, Bulkamid®. Human ASCs derived from a female donor were culture expanded in DMEM/F12 supplemented with human platelet lysate...
January 31, 2018: Stem Cells Translational Medicine
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