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genomic evolution

Laurent Kamel, Michelle Keller-Pearson, Christophe Roux, Jean-Michel Ané
I. II. III. IV. V. References SUMMARY: Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi associate with the vast majority of land plants, providing mutual nutritional benefits and protecting hosts against biotic and abiotic stresses. Significant progress was made recently in our understanding of the genomic organization, the obligate requirements, and the sexual nature of these fungi through the release and subsequent mining of genome sequences. Genomic and genetic approaches also improved our understanding of the signal repertoire used by AM fungi and their plant hosts to recognize each other for the initiation and maintenance of this association...
October 25, 2016: New Phytologist
William B Kristan
How did a structure as complex as our own brain ever evolve? Although biologists have pondered this question since Charles Darwin, the explosion of molecular information in recent years has provided new insights into this question, particularly its first step: the evolution of neurons. Meshing information about genomes with insights from more classical anatomical, physiological, and developmental approaches has led to some remarkable insights and surprises. Because 'phylogenomics' is still a young field, however, there are arguments about which genes to include in comparisons, how much to weigh genetic versus 'classical' features, and which algorithms to use in making such comparisons...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Wolfgang Enard
Humans are a remarkable species, especially because of the remarkable properties of their brain. Since the split from the chimpanzee lineage, the human brain has increased three-fold in size and has acquired abilities for vocal learning, language and intense cooperation. To better understand the molecular basis of these changes is of great biological and biomedical interest. However, all the about 16 million fixed genetic changes that occurred during human evolution are fully correlated with all molecular, cellular, anatomical and behavioral changes that occurred during this time...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Yasuhiro Kyono, Laurent M Sachs, Patrice Bilesimo, Luan Wen, Robert J Denver
Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for normal development in vertebrates. In amphibians, TH controls metamorphosis by inducing tissue-specific gene regulation programs. A hallmark of TH action is the modification of chromatin structure, which underlies changes in gene transcription. We found that mRNA for the de novo DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) dnmt3a, but not dnmt1, increased in the brain of Xenopus tadpoles during metamorphosis in parallel with plasma [TH]. Addition of 3,5,3`-triiodothyronine (T3) to the rearing water caused a time-dependent increase in dnmt3a mRNA in tadpole brain, tail and hind limb...
October 25, 2016: Endocrinology
W S Hambright, Jie Deng, James M Tiedje, Ingrid Brettar, Jorge L M Rodrigues
In bacterial populations, subtle expressional differences may promote ecological specialization through the formation of distinct ecotypes. In a barrier-free habitat, this process most likely precedes population divergence and may predict speciation events. To examine this, we used four sequenced strains of the bacterium Shewanella baltica, OS155, OS185, OS195, and OS223, as models to assess transcriptional variation and ecotype formation within a prokaryotic population. All strains were isolated from different depths throughout a water column of the Baltic Sea, occupying different ecological niches characterized by various abiotic parameters...
September 2016: MSphere
Michael J Wade, Devin M Drown
We use population genetic models to investigate the cooperative and conflicting synergistic fitness effects between genes from the nucleus and the mitochondrion. By varying fitness parameters, we examine the scope for conflict relative to cooperation among genomes and the utility of the "gene's eye view" analytical approach, which is based on the marginal average fitness of specific alleles. Because sexual conflict can maintain polymorphism of mitochondrial haplotypes, we can explore two types of evolutionary conflict (genomic and sexual) with one epistatic model...
September 2016: Ecology and Evolution
Pooja Negi, Archana N Rai, Penna Suprasanna
The recognition of a positive correlation between organism genome size with its transposable element (TE) content, represents a key discovery of the field of genome biology. Considerable evidence accumulated since then suggests the involvement of TEs in genome structure, evolution and function. The global genome reorganization brought about by transposon activity might play an adaptive/regulatory role in the host response to environmental challenges, reminiscent of McClintock's original 'Controlling Element' hypothesis...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Jullien M Flynn, Frédéric J J Chain, Daniel J Schoen, Melania E Cristescu
Understanding the rates, spectra, and fitness effects of spontaneous mutations is fundamental to answering key questions in evolution, molecular biology, disease genetics and conservation biology. To estimate mutation rates and evaluate the effect of selection on new mutations, we propagated mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Daphnia pulex for more than 82 generations and maintained a non-MA population under conditions where selection could act. Both experiments were started with the same obligate asexual progenitor clone...
October 24, 2016: Molecular Biology and Evolution
John E Pool, Dylan T Braun, Justin B Lack
Drosophila melanogaster originated in tropical Africa before expanding into strikingly different temperate climates in Eurasia and beyond. Here, we find elevated cold tolerance in three distinct geographic regions: beyond the well-studied non-African case, we show that populations from the highlands of Ethiopia and South Africa have significantly increased cold tolerance as well. We observe greater cold tolerance in outbred versus inbred flies, but only in populations with higher inversion frequencies. Each cold-adapted population shows lower inversion frequencies than a closely-related warm-adapted population, suggesting that inversion frequencies may decrease with altitude in addition to latitude...
October 24, 2016: Molecular Biology and Evolution
Matthew J Endsin, Ola Michalec, Lori A Manzon, David A Lovejoy, Richard G Manzon
The corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) system, which includes the CRH family of peptides, their receptors (CRHRs) and a binding protein (CRHBP), has been strongly conserved throughout vertebrate evolution. The identification of invertebrate homologues suggests this system evolved over 500 million years ago. However, the early vertebrate evolution of the CRH system is not understood. Current theory indicates that Agnathans (hagfishes and lampreys) are monophyletic with a conservative evolution over the past 500 million years and occupy a position at the root of vertebrate phylogeny...
October 21, 2016: General and Comparative Endocrinology
Shintaro Maeno, Yasuhiro Tanizawa, Yu Kanesaki, Eri Kubota, Himanshu Kumar, Leon Dicks, Seppo Salminen, Junichi Nakagawa, Masanori Arita, Akihito Endo
Lactobacillus kunkeei is classified as a sole obligate fructophilic lactic acid bacterium that is found in fructose-rich niches, including the guts of honeybees. The species is differentiated from other lactobacilli based on its poor growth with glucose, enhanced growth in the presence of oxygen and other electron acceptors, and production of high concentrations of acetate from the metabolism of glucose. These characteristics are similar to phylogenetically distant Fructobacillus spp. In the present study, the genomic structure of L...
October 13, 2016: Systematic and Applied Microbiology
Michael M Kasumovic, Zhiliang Chen, Marc R Wilkins
BACKGROUND: Ecological and evolutionary model organisms have provided extensive insight into the ecological triggers, adaptive benefits, and evolution of life-history driven developmental plasticity. Despite this, we still have a poor understanding of the underlying genetic changes that occur during shifts towards different developmental trajectories. The goal of this study is to determine whether we can identify underlying gene expression patterns that can describe the different life-history trajectories individuals follow in response to social cues of competition...
October 24, 2016: BMC Genomics
Hiroshi Hisano, Mai Tsujimura, Hideya Yoshida, Toru Terachi, Kazuhiro Sato
BACKGROUND: Sequencing analysis of mitochondrial genomes is important for understanding the evolution and genome structures of various plant species. Barley is a self-pollinated diploid plant with seven chromosomes comprising a large haploid genome of 5.1 Gbp. Wild barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum) and cultivated barley (H. vulgare ssp. vulgare) have cross compatibility and closely related genomes, although a significant number of nucleotide polymorphisms have been reported between their genomes...
October 24, 2016: BMC Genomics
Joanna Melonek, James D Stone, Ian Small
Hybrid seed production in rice relies on cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) induced by specific mitochondrial proteins, whose deleterious effects are suppressed by nuclear Restorer of Fertility (RF) genes. The majority of RF proteins belong to a specific clade of the RNA-binding pentatricopeptide repeat protein family. We have characterised 'restorer-of-fertility-like' (RFL) sequences from 13 Oryza genomes and the Brachypodium distachyon genome. The majority of the RFL sequences are found in genomic clusters located at two or three chromosomal loci with only a minor proportion being present as isolated genes...
October 24, 2016: Scientific Reports
Han Xia, Andrew S Beck, Aysen Gargili, Naomi Forrester, Alan D T Barrett, Dennis A Bente
The trade-off hypothesis, the current paradigm of arbovirus evolution, proposes that cycling between vertebrate and invertebrate hosts presents significant constraints on genetic change of arboviruses. Studying these constraints in mosquito-borne viruses has led to a new understanding of epizootics. The trade-off hypothesis is assumed to be applicable to tick-borne viruses too, although studies are lacking. Tick-borne Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, is a major cause of severe human disease worldwide and shows an extraordinary amount of genetic diversity compared to other arboviruses, which has been linked to increased virulence and emergence in new environments...
October 24, 2016: Scientific Reports
Ya-Li Liu, Dong-Fang Li, He-Ping Xu, Meng Xiao, Jing-Wei Cheng, Li Zhang, Zhi-Peng Xu, Xin-Xin Chen, Ge Zhang, Timothy Kudinha, Fanrong Kong, Yan-Ping Gong, Xin-Ying Wang, Yin-Xin Zhang, Hong-Long Wu, Ying-Chun Xu
Although previous studies have confirmed that 23S rRNA gene mutation could be responsible for most of macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis, a recent study suggested otherwise. Next generation sequence based comparative genomics has revolutionized the mining of potential novel drug resistant mechanisms. In this study, two pairs of resistant and susceptible M. catarrhalis isolates with different multilocus sequence types, were investigated for potential differential genes or informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)...
October 24, 2016: Scientific Reports
Jinhu Huang, Jiale Ma, Kexin Shang, Xiao Hu, Yuan Liang, Daiwei Li, Zuowei Wu, Lei Dai, Li Chen, Liping Wang
Streptococcus suis is a previously neglected, newly emerging multidrug-resistant zoonotic pathogen. Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) play a key role in intra- and interspecies horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinants. Although, previous studies showed the presence of several MGEs, a comprehensive analysis of AMR-associated mobilome as well as their interaction and evolution has not been performed. In this study, we presented the AMR-associated mobilome and their insertion hotspots in S...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Lize Cuypers, Guangdi Li, Christoph Neumann-Haefelin, Supinya Piampongsant, Pieter Libin, Kristel Van Laethem, Anne-Mieke Vandamme, Kristof Theys
Despite significant progress in hepatitis C (HCV) treatment, global viral eradication remains a challenge. An in-depth map of its genome diversity within the context of structural and immunological constraints could contribute to the design of pan-genotypic antivirals and preventive vaccines. For such analyses, extensive information is only available for the highly prevalent HCV genotypes (GT) 1a and 1b. Using 647 GT1a and 408 GT1b full-genome sequences obtained from the Los Alamos database, we found that respectively 3 per cent and 82 per cent of all codon positions are under positive and negative selective pressure, suggesting variation mainly accumulates due to random genetic drift...
July 2016: Virus Evolution
Marta Canuti, Kimberly E O'Leary, Bruce D Hunter, Grant Spearman, Davor Ojkic, Hugh G Whitney, Andrew S Lang
Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) causes plasmacytosis, an immune complex-associated syndrome that affects wild and farmed mink. The virus can also infect other small mammals (e.g., ferrets, skunks, ermines, and raccoons), but the disease in these hosts has been studied less. In 2007, a mink plasmacytosis outbreak began on the Island of Newfoundland, and the virus has been endemic in farms since then. In this study, we evaluated the molecular epidemiology of AMDV in farmed and wild animals of Newfoundland since before the beginning of the outbreak and investigated the epidemic in a global context by studying AMDV worldwide, thereby examining its diffusion and phylogeography...
January 2016: Virus Evolution
Sen Gao, Shikai Liu, Jun Yao, Ning Li, Zihao Yuan, Tao Zhou, Qi Li, Zhanjiang Liu
BACKGROUND: Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) live in turbid waters with limited visibility to chase prey within a certain distance. This can be compensated through detecting specific water-soluble substances by the olfactory receptors (ORs) and trace amine associated receptors (TAARs) expressed on the olfactory epithelium. METHODS: We identified the OR and TAAR repertoires in channel catfish, and characterized the genomic organizations of these two gene families by data mining available genomic resources...
October 20, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
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