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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28725393/water-mold-infection-but-not-paternity-induces-selective-filial-cannibalism-in-a-goby
#1
Martin Vallon, Nils Anthes, Katja U Heubel
Many animals heavily invest in parental care but still reject at least some of their offspring. Although seemingly paradoxical, selection can favor parents to neglect offspring of particularly low reproductive value, for example, because of small survival chances. We here assess whether filial cannibalism (FC), where parents routinely eat some of their own young, is selective in response to individual offspring reproductive value. We performed two independent laboratory experiments in the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps) to test whether caring fathers preferentially cannibalize eggs of a given infection history and paternity...
October 2016: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28717592/epas1-variants-in-high-altitude-tibetan-wolves-were-selectively-introgressed-into-highland-dogs
#2
Bridgett vonHoldt, Zhenxin Fan, Diego Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Robert K Wayne
BACKGROUND: Admixture can facilitate adaptation. For example, black wolves have obtained the variant causing black coat color through past hybridization with domestic dogs and have higher fitness than gray colored wolves. Another recent example of the transfer of adaptive variation between the two species has been suggested by the similarity between high altitude Tibetan mastiffs and wolves at the EPAS1 gene, a transcription factor induced in low oxygen environments. METHODS: Here, we investigate the directionality of admixture in EPAS1 between 28 reference highland gray wolves, 15 reference domestic dogs, and 21 putatively admixed highland wolves...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28711317/invasion-fitness-for-gene-culture-co-evolution-in-family-structured-populations-and-an-application-to-cumulative-culture-under-vertical-transmission
#3
Charles Mullon, Laurent Lehmann
Human evolution depends on the co-evolution between genetically determined behaviors and socially transmitted information. Although vertical transmission of cultural information from parent to offspring is common in hominins, its effects on cumulative cultural evolution are not fully understood. Here, we investigate gene-culture co-evolution in a family-structured population by studying the invasion fitness of a mutant allele that influences a deterministic level of cultural information (e.g., amount of knowledge or skill) to which diploid carriers of the mutant are exposed in subsequent generations...
July 12, 2017: Theoretical Population Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28699275/the-concepts-of-asymmetric-and-symmetric-power-can-help-resolve-the-puzzle-of-altruistic-and-cooperative-behaviour
#4
Tim Phillips
Evolutionary theory predicts competition in nature yet altruistic and cooperative behaviour appears to reduce the ability to compete in order to help others compete better. This evolutionary puzzle is usually explained by kin selection where close relatives perform altruistic and cooperative acts to help each other and by reciprocity theory (i.e. direct, indirect and generalized reciprocity) among non-kin. Here, it is proposed that the concepts of asymmetry and symmetry in power and dominance are critical if we are ever to resolve the puzzle of altruism and cooperation towards non-kin...
July 11, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28688916/venom-proteome-of-the-yellow-lipped-sea-krait-laticauda-colubrina-from-bali-insights-into-subvenomic-diversity-venom-antigenicity-and-cross-neutralization-by-antivenom
#5
Choo Hock Tan, Kin Ying Wong, Kae Yi Tan, Nget Hong Tan
The venom proteome of Laticauda colubrina (Bali, Indonesia) was elucidated by nano-ESI-LCMS/MS of the venom reverse-phase HPLC fractions. Altogether 31 distinct forms of proteins were identified and clustered into three toxin families: three-finger toxin (3FTX, 66.12% of total venom proteins), phospholipase A2 (PLA2, 33.26%) and cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRiSP, 0.05%). The 3FTX were α-neurotoxins (five long neurotoxins, LNTX, 48.87%; two short neurotoxins, SNTX, 16.70%) and a trace amount of two cytotoxins (CTX, 0...
July 5, 2017: Journal of Proteomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28681169/influence-of-proximity-to-kin-on-residential-mobility-and-destination-choice-examining-local-movers-in-metropolitan-areas
#6
Amy Spring, Elizabeth Ackert, Kyle Crowder, Scott J South
A growing body of research has examined how family dynamics shape residential mobility, highlighting the social-as opposed to economic-drivers of mobility. However, few studies have examined kin ties as both push and pull factors in mobility processes or revealed how the influence of kin ties on mobility varies across sociodemographic groups. Using data on local residential moves from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) from 1980 to 2013, we find that location of noncoresident kin influences the likelihood of moving out of the current neighborhood and the selection of a new destination neighborhood...
July 5, 2017: Demography
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28672203/-how-complex-and-even-perverse-the-real-world-can-be-w-d-hamilton-s-early-work-on-social-wasps-1964-1968
#7
Guido Caniglia
William D. Hamilton's name is often connected to important theoretical accomplishments, from the theory of inclusive fitness and kin selection to the so-called Hamilton's rule and the haplodiploidy hypothesis. This article asks: How did Hamilton attempt to test his theory and hypothesis against the complexity of the biological world? The article reconstructs Hamilton's empirical work with social wasps between 1963 and 1968, the years before and after the publication of the groundbreaking "The Genetical Evolution of Social Behavior" in 1964...
June 30, 2017: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28659767/hornets-have-it-a-conserved-olfactory-subsystem-for-social-recognition-in-hymenoptera
#8
Antoine Couto, Aniruddha Mitra, Denis Thiéry, Frédéric Marion-Poll, Jean-Christophe Sandoz
Eusocial Hymenoptera colonies are characterized by the presence of altruistic individuals, which rear their siblings instead of their own offspring. In the course of evolution, such sterile castes are thought to have emerged through the process of kin selection, altruistic traits being transmitted to following generation if they benefit relatives. By allowing kinship recognition, the detection of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) might be instrumental for kin selection. In carpenter ants, a female-specific olfactory subsystem processes CHC information through antennal detection by basiconic sensilla...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28640823/estimating-the-number-of-secondary-ebola-cases-resulting-from-an-unsafe-burial-and-risk-factors-for-transmission-during-the-west-africa-ebola-epidemic
#9
Amanda Tiffany, Benjamin D Dalziel, Hilary Kagume Njenge, Ginger Johnson, Roselyn Nugba Ballah, Daniel James, Abdoulaye Wone, Juliet Bedford, Amanda McClelland
BACKGROUND: Safely burying Ebola infected individuals is acknowledged to be important for controlling Ebola epidemics and was a major component of the 2013-2016 West Africa Ebola response. Yet, in order to understand the impact of safe burial programs it is necessary to elucidate the role of unsafe burials in sustaining chains of Ebola transmission and how the risk posed by activities surrounding unsafe burials, including care provided at home prior to death, vary with human behavior and geography...
June 2017: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622934/selection-to-outsmart-the-germs-the-evolution-of-disease-recognition-and-social-cognition
#10
Sharon E Kessler, Tyler R Bonnell, Richard W Byrne, Colin A Chapman
The emergence of providing care to diseased conspecifics must have been a turning point during the evolution of hominin sociality. On a population level, care may have minimized the costs of socially transmitted diseases at a time of increasing social complexity, although individual care-givers probably incurred increased transmission risks. We propose that care-giving likely originated within kin networks, where the costs may have been balanced by fitness increases obtained through caring for ill kin. We test a novel hypothesis of hominin cognitive evolution in which disease may have selected for the cognitive ability to recognize when a conspecific is infected...
July 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28609611/selective-aliphatic-carbon-carbon-bond-activation-by-rhodium-porphyrin-complexes
#11
Ching Tat To, Kin Shing Chan
The carbon-carbon bond activation of organic molecules with transition metal complexes is an attractive transformation. These reactions form transition metal-carbon bonded intermediates, which contribute to fundamental understanding in organometallic chemistry. Alternatively, the metal-carbon bond in these intermediates can be further functionalized to construct new carbon-(hetero)atom bonds. This methodology promotes the concept that the carbon-carbon bond acts as a functional group, although carbon-carbon bonds are kinetically inert...
June 13, 2017: Accounts of Chemical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28591651/transplantation-of-human-pancreatic-endoderm-cells-reverses-diabetes-post-transplantation-in-a-prevascularized-subcutaneous-site
#12
Andrew R Pepper, Rena Pawlick, Antonio Bruni, John Wink, Yasmin Rafiei, Doug O'Gorman, Richard Yan-Do, Boris Gala-Lopez, Tatsuya Kin, Patrick E MacDonald, A M James Shapiro
Beta-cell replacement therapy is an effective means to restore glucose homeostasis in select humans with autoimmune diabetes. The scarcity of "healthy" human donor pancreata restricts the broader application of this effective curative therapy. "β-Like" cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC), with the capacity to secrete insulin in a glucose-regulated manner, have been developed in vitro, with limitless capacity for expansion. Here we report long-term diabetes correction in mice transplanted with hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs) in a prevascularized subcutaneous site...
June 6, 2017: Stem Cell Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28583138/molecular-characterization-of-breast-cancer-cell-lines-through-multiple-omic-approaches
#13
Shari E Smith, Paul Mellor, Alison K Ward, Stephanie Kendall, Megan McDonald, Frederick S Vizeacoumar, Franco J Vizeacoumar, Scott Napper, Deborah H Anderson
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer cell lines are frequently used as model systems to study the cellular properties and biology of breast cancer. Our objective was to characterize a large, commonly employed panel of breast cancer cell lines obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC 30-4500 K) to enable researchers to make more informed decisions in selecting cell lines for specific studies. Information about these cell lines was obtained from a wide variety of sources. In addition, new information about cellular pathways that are activated within each cell line was generated...
June 5, 2017: Breast Cancer Research: BCR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28568742/chromosome-copy-number-variants-in-fetuses-with-syndromic-malformations
#14
REVIEW
Huilin Wang, Matthew Hoi Kin Chau, Ye Cao, Ka Yin Kwok, Kwong Wai Choy
Chromosome copy number variants (CNVs; gains and losses of DNA sequences >1 kb) are wide-spread throughout the genome of healthy individuals. Laboratory studies show that a subset of CNVs are pathogenic, and not only can be responsible for the pathogenesis of major birth defects and cancer, but are also associated with neurodevelopmental disorders at birth. The characteristics of the pathogenic microdeletions and microduplications are important for both clinical implications and genetic counselling regarding test selection for prenatal screening and diagnosis...
June 1, 2017: Birth defects research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540044/experiences-of-supportive-care-when-waiting-for-a-lung-re-transplantation
#15
Bodil Ivarsson, Richard Ingemansson, Trygve Sjöberg
OBJECTIVES: Lung transplant patients and their next of kin share the experiences of illness but little is known in the face of a lung re-transplantation. To describe patients' and next of kin's experiences of supportive care while awaiting lung re-transplantation and the objective was to highlight a small group with special circumstances and needs. METHODS: Using qualitative content analysis, seven adult patients and seven next of kin were consecutively selected from a regional lung transplantation centre and individually interviewed shortly after decision about lung re-transplantation...
2017: SAGE Open Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28514634/convergent-reversion-to-single-mating-in-a-wasp-social-parasite
#16
Kevin J Loope, Federico Lopez-Osorio, Libor Dvořák
While eusociality arose in species with single-mating females, multiple mating by queens has evolved repeatedly across the social ants, bees, and wasps. Understanding the benefits and costs of multiple mating of queens is important because polyandry results in reduced relatedness between siblings, reducing kin-selected benefits of helping while also selecting for secondary social traits that reduce intracolony conflict. The leading hypothesis for the benefits of polyandry in social insects emphasizes advantages of a genetically diverse workforce...
June 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28510624/chromatic-interocular-switch-rivalry
#17
Jens H Christiansen, Anthony D D'Antona, Steven K Shevell
Interocular-switch rivalry (also known as stimulus rivalry) is a kind of binocular rivalry in which two rivalrous images are swapped between the eyes several times a second. The result is stable periods of one image and then the other, with stable intervals that span many eye swaps (Logothetis, Leopold, & Sheinberg, 1996). Previous work used this close kin of binocular rivalry with rivalrous forms. Experiments here test whether chromatic interocular-switch rivalry, in which the swapped stimuli differ in only chromaticity, results in slow alternation between two colors...
May 1, 2017: Journal of Vision
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28480586/the-ecology-of-cooperative-breeding-behaviour
#18
Sheng-Feng Shen, Stephen T Emlen, Walter D Koenig, Dustin R Rubenstein
Ecology is a fundamental driving force for the evolutionary transition from solitary living to breeding cooperatively in groups. However, the fact that both benign and harsh, as well as stable and fluctuating, environments can favour the evolution of cooperative breeding behaviour constitutes a paradox of environmental quality and sociality. Here, we propose a new model - the dual benefits framework - for resolving this paradox. Our framework distinguishes between two categories of grouping benefits - resource defence benefits that derive from group-defended critical resources and collective action benefits that result from social cooperation among group members - and uses insider-outsider conflict theory to simultaneously consider the interests of current group members (insiders) and potential joiners (outsiders) in determining optimal group size...
June 2017: Ecology Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473640/anterolateral-entorhinal-cortex-volume-predicted-by-altered-intra-item-configural-processing
#19
Lok-Kin Yeung, Rosanna K Olsen, Hannah E P Bild-Enkin, Maria C D'Angelo, Arber Kacollja, Douglas A McQuiggan, Anna Keshabyan, Jennifer D Ryan, Morgan D Barense
Recent functional imaging studies have proposed that the human entorhinal cortex is subdivided into functionally distinct anterolateral (alERC) and posteromedial (pmERC) subregions. The alERC overlaps with regions that are affected earliest by Alzheimer's disease pathology, yet its cognitive function remains poorly understood. Previous human fMRI studies have focused on its role in object memory, but rodent studies on the putatively homologous lateral entorhinal cortex suggest that it also plays an important role in representing spatial properties of objects...
May 4, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28469015/biased-escorts-offspring-sex-not-relatedness-explains-alloparental-care-patterns-in-a-cooperative-breeder
#20
Emma I K Vitikainen, Harry H Marshall, Faye J Thompson, Jenni L Sanderson, Matthew B V Bell, Jason S Gilchrist, Sarah J Hodge, Hazel J Nichols, Michael A Cant
Kin selection theory predicts that animals should direct costly care where inclusive fitness gains are highest. Individuals may achieve this by directing care at closer relatives, yet evidence for such discrimination in vertebrates is equivocal. We investigated patterns of cooperative care in banded mongooses, where communal litters are raised by adult 'escorts' who form exclusive caring relationships with individual pups. We found no evidence that escorts and pups assort by parentage or relatedness. However, the time males spent escorting increased with increasing relatedness to the other group members, and to the pup they had paired with...
May 17, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
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