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Learner self reflection

James Rourke, Shabnam Asghari, Oliver Hurley, Mohamed Ravalia, Michael Jong, Wanda Parsons, Norah Duggan, Katherine Stringer, Danielle O'Keefe, Scott Moffatt, Wendy Graham, Carolyn Sturge Sparkes, Janelle Hippe, Kristin Harris Walsh, Donald McKay, Asoka Samarasena
CONTEXT: This report describes the community context, concept and mission of The Faculty of Medicine at Memorial University of Newfoundland (Memorial), Canada, and its 'pathways to rural practice' approach, which includes influences at the pre-medical school, medical school experience, postgraduate residency training, and physician practice levels. Memorial's pathways to practice helped Memorial to fulfill its social accountability mandate to populate the province with highly skilled rural generalist practitioners...
March 2018: Rural and Remote Health
Rintaro Imafuku, Ryuta Kataoka, Hiroshi Ogura, Hisayoshi Suzuki, Megumi Enokida, Keitaro Osakabe
Interprofessional collaboration is an essential approach to comprehensive patient care. As previous studies have argued, interprofessional education (IPE) must be integrated in a stepwise, systematic manner in undergraduate health profession education programmes. Given this perspective, first-year IPE is a critical opportunity for building the foundation of interprofessional collaborative practice. This study aims to explore the first-year students' learning processes and the longitudinal changes in their perceptions of learning in a year-long IPE programme...
January 24, 2018: Journal of Interprofessional Care
Kyung In Jeong, Ja Yun Choi
PURPOSE: This study was conducted to identify effects of debriefing based on the clinical judgment model for nursing students on their knowledge, skill performance, clinical judgment, self-confidence and learner satisfaction during simulation based end-of-life care (ELC) education. METHODS: Simulation based ELC education was developed in six steps as follows: selection of learning subjects and objects, development of learning tools, a trial run of simulation-based education, students' skill training, and evaluators' training...
December 2017: Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
Hetty Cunningham, Delphine Taylor, Urmi A Desai, Samuel C Quiah, Benjamin Kaplan, Lorraine Fei, Marina Catallozzi, Boyd Richards, Dorene F Balmer, Rita Charon
The day-to-day rigors of medical education often preclude learners from gaining a longitudinal perspective on who they are becoming. Furthermore, the current focus on competencies, coupled with concerning rates of trainee burnout and a decline in empathy, have fueled the search for pedagogic tools to foster students' reflective capacity. In response, many scholars have looked to the tradition of narrative medicine to foster "reflective spaces" wherein holistic professional identity construction can be supported...
December 19, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Michael J Rouse, CoraLynn B Trewet, Kristin K Janke
OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this commentary are to: 1) describe advancements in the continuing professional development (CPD) model over the past decade; 2) detail an updated CPD cycle; and 3) describe how practitioners' adoption of the CPD approach may facilitate the advancement of pharmacy practice. SUMMARY: CPD is a self-directed, ongoing, systematic, and outcomes-focused approach to an individual's lifelong learning that is applied into practice. The 6 components of reflect, plan, learn, evaluate, apply, and record + review, described in a revised depiction of the CPD cycle, have evolved over the past 10 years alongside the evolution of the profession of pharmacy...
March 2018: Journal of the American Pharmacists Association: JAPhA
Debra K Litzelman, Adrian Gardner, Robert M Einterz, Philip Owiti, Charity Wambui, Jordan C Huskins, Kathleen M Schmitt-Wendholt, Geren S Stone, Paul O Ayuo, Thomas S Inui, Rachel A Umoren
BACKGROUND: Globalization has increased the demand for international experiences in medical education. International experiences improve medical knowledge, clinical skills, and self-development; influence career objectives; and provide insights on ethical and societal issues. However, global health rotations can end up being no more than tourism if not structured to foster personal transformation and global citizenship. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a qualitative assessment of trainee-reported critical incidents to more deeply understand the impact of our global health experience on trainees...
May 2017: Annals of Global Health
Qing Wang, Ho Chung Law, Yan Li, Zhanfei Xu, Weiguo Pang
The article explores undergraduate students' experiences of developing mindful agency as a positive learning disposition, their perceived change as a learner, and the possible impact of mindful agency coaching on students' learning and personal growth, using a narrative research method. Seventy Chinese undergraduate students generated personal reflective journals and eight participants' journals were selected to enter into the narrative-oriented inquiry. Our analysis revealed a number of primary themes based on which we produced a meta-story...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
Karen E Hauer, Patricia S O'Sullivan, Kristen Fitzhenry, Christy Boscardin
PROBLEM: A program of assessment addresses challenges in learner assessment using a centrally planned, coordinated approach that emphasizes assessment for learning. This report describes the steps taken to implement a program of assessment framework within a medical school. APPROACH: A literature review on best practices in assessment highlighted six principles that guided implementation of the program of assessment in 2016-2017: (1) a centrally coordinated plan for assessment aligns with and supports a curricular vision; (2) multiple assessment tools used longitudinally generate multiple data points; (3) learners require ready access to information-rich feedback to promote reflection and informed self-assessment; (4) mentoring is essential to facilitate effective data use for reflection and learning planning; (5) the program of assessment fosters self-regulated learning behaviors; and (6) expert groups make summative decisions about grades and readiness for advancement...
November 7, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Paula L Schultz, Janet Baker
BACKGROUND: Medical providers' unconscious biases may contribute to health disparities. Awareness and self-reflection strategies commonly used to teach cultural competence in academic settings are generally ineffective in reducing unconscious bias or motivating change. METHOD: This article describes the innovative teaching strategies implemented in a graduate setting (N = 75) to increase nursing learners' acceptance and management of unconscious bias. Strategies used guided the debriefing and feedback that incorporated implicit association testing, interactive audience polling, categorized management strategies, and perspective taking...
November 1, 2017: Journal of Nursing Education
Zareen Zaidi, Rashmi Vyas, Danielle Verstegen, Page Morahan, Tim Dornan
PURPOSE: To analyze educators' experiences of facilitating cultural discussions in two global health professions education programs and what these experiences had taught them about critical consciousness. METHOD: A multicultural research team conducted in-depth interviews with 16 faculty who had extensive experience facilitating cultural discussions. They analyzed transcripts of the interviews thematically, drawing sensitizing insights from Gramsci's theory of cultural hegemony...
November 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Anita Cheng, Kori LaDonna, Sayra Cristancho, Stella Ng
CONTEXT: Clinicians draw upon experiential knowledge to manoeuvre difficult conversations, using tacit knowledge that is difficult to explicitly teach. Instead, learners are taught to communicate through role-play and checklists, both of which are approaches that may fail during moments of clinical complexity. We know that difficult conversations may provoke anxiety in learners, but we know little about how they learn to navigate them. Without a deeper understanding, we may fail to equip learners with the skills to manoeuvre these conversations in practice...
October 6, 2017: Medical Education
Cora L Housley, Kathryn K Neill, Lanita S White, Andrea T Tedder, Ashley N Castleberry
The 12th Street Health and Wellness Center is an interprofessional, student-led, community-based clinic. Students from all University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences colleges work together to provide healthcare services for residents of an underserved community. Interprofessional student teams assess patients and present to an interprofessional preceptor team. At the conclusion of clinic, teams reflect on their experience. The objective of this study is to generate key themes from the end of clinic reflections to describe learning outcomes in an interprofessional practice environment...
January 2018: Journal of Interprofessional Care
Vibeke Stenov, Gitte Wind, Timothy Skinner, Susanne Reventlow, Nana Folmann Hempler
BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals' person-centered communication skills are pivotal for successful group-based diabetes education. However, healthcare professionals are often insufficiently equipped to facilitate person-centeredness and many have never received post-graduate training. Currently, assessing professionals' skills in conducting group-based, person-centered diabetes education primarily focus on experts measuring and coding skills on various scales. However, learner-centered approaches such as adequate self-reflective tools have been shown to emphasize professional autonomy and promote engagement...
September 18, 2017: BMC Medical Education
Lars Ballieu Christensen, Tanja Stevns
This paper presents how SensusAccess has been adapted and is being used in higher education to create inclusive educational environments. Reflecting on challenges of providing alternate versions of educational material to students with disabilities, it also discusses how the service can benefit mainstream learners.
2017: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
Amber Shamim Sultan, Muhammad Arif Mateen Khan
Feedback is considered as a dynamic process in which information about the observed performance is used to promote the desirable behaviour and correct the negative ones. The importance of feedback is widely acknowledged, but still there seems to be inconsistency in the amount, type and timing of feedback received from the clinical faculty. No significant effort has been put forward from the educator end to empower the learners with the skills of receiving and using the feedback effectively. Some institutions conduct faculty development workshops and courses to facilitate the clinicians on how best to deliver constructive feedback to the learners...
July 2017: JPMA. the Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
Lisa Day, Scott R Ziehm, Martha A Jessup, Pattie Amedro, Carol Dawson-Rose, Anne Derouin, Betsy Babb Kennedy, Sally Manahan, Abby Luck Parish, Rachel Naomi Remen
Teaching for a practice is more than the dissemination of knowledge and information to the learner. Professional nursing education requires teachers to facilitate students' self-reflection and awareness and assimilation of core professional and personal values in order for the new nurse to anchor and internalize these values as part of a professional identity. To achieve this, nursing educators recognize the importance of learning opportunities centered in the affective domain and the importance of teaching for professional formation that supports nursing students' commitment to the values of their chosen community of practice...
July 2017: Journal of Professional Nursing: Official Journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing
Melissa S Medina, Ashley N Castleberry, Adam M Persky
Metacognition is an essential skill in critical thinking and self-regulated, lifelong learning. It is important for learners to have skills in metacognition because they are used to monitor and regulate reasoning, comprehension, and problem-solving, which are fundamental components/outcomes of pharmacy curricula. Instructors can help learners develop metacognitive skills within the classroom and experiential setting by carefully designing learning activities within courses and the curriculum. These skills are developed through intentional questioning, modeling techniques, and reflection...
May 2017: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
José Miguel Pêgo, João José Cerqueira, João Bessa, Vitor Hugo Pereira, Sara Gomes, José Mariz, Rita Sousa, Pedro Morgado, Nuno Sousa
INTRODUCTION: Medical Education has evolved being defined as a continuum of the medical training from the pre- to the post-graduate period and through a lifetime of medical practice that is mirrored in the competencies framework that several international institutions have established. This creates a challenge to educational institutions (pre- and post-graduate) that traditionally take separate pathways. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present report is a description of the efforts carried by the School of Medicine of the University of Minho to implement a strategy of teaching/learning methods that follows modern standards towards constructive alignment of the medical curriculum, from the pre- to the post-graduate...
February 27, 2017: Acta Médica Portuguesa
Michelle H Yoon, Benjamin C Blatt, Larrie W Greenberg
Phenomenon: Teaching is an important part of the tri-partite mission of every medical center. Although teaching often is given lower priority and recognition as opposed to patient care and/or research, this activity for many physicians in academic medicine ranks second to their patient care responsibilities. Medical teacher training has traditionally been aimed at faculty and residents through faculty development initiatives, continuing education for physicians at professional conferences, formalized degree or certificate programs in education, and residents as teachers programs...
October 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
Patricia Chen, Omar Chavez, Desmond C Ong, Brenda Gunderson
Many educational policies provide learners with more resources (e.g., new learning activities, study materials, or technologies), but less often do they address whether students are using these resources effectively. We hypothesized that making students more self-reflective about how they should approach their learning with the resources available to them would improve their class performance. We designed a novel Strategic Resource Use intervention that students could self-administer online and tested its effects in two cohorts of a college-level introductory statistics class...
June 2017: Psychological Science
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