keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Muscle growth resistance training

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29207472/effects-of-%C3%AE-hydroxy-%C3%AE-methylbutyrate-free-acid-supplementation-on-strength-power-and-hormonal-adaptations-following-resistance-training
#1
Abbas Asadi, Hamid Arazi, Katsuhiko Suzuki
BACKGROUND: β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate-free acid (HMB-FA) has been ingested prior to exercise to reduce muscle damage, however the effects of HMB-FA supplementation on hormonal, strength and power adaptation are unclear. METHODS: Sixteen healthy men were matched and randomized into two groups and performed six-week resistance training while supplementing with either HMB-FA or placebo (3 g per day). The subjects were evaluated for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press and leg press and vertical jump (VJ) prior to and after training intervention...
December 2, 2017: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29172848/the-role-of-hormones-in-muscle-hypertrophy
#2
Julius Fink, Brad Jon Schoenfeld, Koichi Nakazato
Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and other hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) have been shown to increase muscle mass in patients suffering from various diseases related to muscle atrophy. Despite known side-effects associated with supraphysiologic doses of such drugs, their anabolic effects have led to their widespread use and abuse by bodybuilders and athletes such as strength athletes seeking to improve performance and muscle mass. On the other hand, resistance training (RT) has also been shown to induce significant endogenous hormonal (testosterone (T), GH, IGF-1) elevations...
November 25, 2017: Physician and Sportsmedicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29154428/muscle-wasting-and-sarcopenia-in-heart-failure-and-beyond-update-2017
#3
REVIEW
Jochen Springer, Joshua-I Springer, Stefan D Anker
Sarcopenia (loss of muscle mass and muscle function) is a strong predictor of frailty, disability and mortality in older persons and may also occur in obese subjects. The prevalence of sarcopenia is increased in patients suffering from chronic heart failure. However, there are currently few therapy options. The main intervention is resistance exercise, either alone or in combination with nutritional support, which seems to enhance the beneficial effects of training. Also, testosterone has been shown to increased muscle power and function; however, a possible limitation is the side effects of testosterone...
November 2017: ESC Heart Failure
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29123172/transcriptomic-and-epigenetic-responses-to-short-term-nutrient-exercise-stress-in-humans
#4
R C Laker, C Garde, D M Camera, W J Smiles, J R Zierath, J A Hawley, R Barrès
High fat feeding impairs skeletal muscle metabolic flexibility and induces insulin resistance, whereas exercise training exerts positive effects on substrate handling and improves insulin sensitivity. To identify the genomic mechanisms by which exercise ameliorates some of the deleterious effects of high fat feeding, we investigated the transcriptional and epigenetic response of human skeletal muscle to 9 days of a high-fat diet (HFD) alone (Sed-HFD) or in combination with resistance exercise (Ex-HFD), using genome-wide profiling of gene expression and DNA methylation...
November 9, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29120984/effects-of-different-resistance-training-systems-on-muscular-strength-and-hypertrophy-in-resistance-trained-older-women
#5
Alex S Ribeiro, Andreo F Aguiar, Brad J Schoenfeld, João Pedro Nunes, Edilaine F Cavalcanti, Eduardo L Cadore, Edilson S Cyrino
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resistance training (RT) performed in a pyramid (PR) versus constant (CT) load system on muscular strength and hypertrophy in resistance-trained older women. Thirty-three older women (69.7±5.9 years, 69.1±15.0 kg, 156.6±6.2 cm, and 28.1±5.4 kg.m) were randomized into 2 groups: one that performed RT with a CT load (n = 16) and another group that performed RT in an ascending PR fashion (n = 17). Outcomes included 1 repetition maximum (RM) tests and assessment of skeletal muscle mass estimated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry...
November 6, 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29080996/impact-of-local-heating-and-cooling-on-skeletal-muscle-transcriptional-response-related-to-myogenesis-and-proteolysis
#6
Roksana B Zak, B M Hassenstab, L K Zuehlke, M W S Heesch, R J Shute, T L Laursen, D T LaSalle, D R Slivka
PURPOSE: To determine the impact of local muscle heating and cooling on myogenic and proteolytic gene responses following resistance exercise. METHODS: Recreationally trained males (n = 12), age 25.3 ± 1.5, % body fat 13.6 ± 1.92, completed four sets of 8-12 repetitions of unilateral leg press and leg extension while heating one leg, and cooling the other. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis of each leg pre and 4 h post exercise. RESULTS: MyoD, FOXO1, and MuRF1 mRNA increased with exercise regardless of temperature (p < 0...
October 28, 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29045191/the-efficacy-of-resistance-training-in-hypoxia-to-enhance-strength-and-muscle-growth-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#7
Domingo J Ramos-Campo, Brendan R Scott, Pedro E Alcaraz, Jacobo A Rubio-Arias
Recent studies have reported that resistance training in hypoxia (RTH) may augment muscle size and strength development. However, consensus on the effects of RTH via systematic review and meta-analysis is not yet available. This work aimed to systematically review studies which have investigated using RTH versus normoxic resistance training (NRT) to improve muscular size and strength, and to perform a meta-analysis to determine the effect of RTH on these adaptive parameters. Searches were conducted in PubMed, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library from database inception until 17 June 2017 for original articles assessing the effects of RTH on muscle size and strength versus NRT...
October 18, 2017: European Journal of Sport Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29036766/resistance-training-increases-fibroblast-growth-factor-21-and-irisin-levels-in-the-skeletal-muscle-of-zucker-diabetic-fatty-rats
#8
Hee-Jae Kim, Wook Song
PURPOSE: Although the fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) and irisin roles are well demonstrated in metabolic disease, there have been no reports investigating the effect of resistance exercise on FGF-21 and irisin levels in diabetic skeletal muscles. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the change of FGF-21 and irisin levels in various skeletal muscles, and their association with muscle strength, following 8 weeks of resistance training using Zucker diabetic fatty rats (type 2 diabetic animal models)...
September 30, 2017: Journal of Exercise Nutrition & Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28993146/exercise-training-reverses-the-negative-effects-of-chronic-l-arginine-supplementation-on-insulin-sensitivity
#9
Rafael Barrera Salgueiro, Frederico Gerlinger-Romero, Lucas Guimarães-Ferreira, Thais de Castro Barbosa, Maria Tereza Nunes
L-Arginine has emerged as an important supplement for athletes and non-athletes in order to improve performance. Arginine has been extensively used as substrate for nitric oxide synthesis, leading to increased vasodilatation and hormonal secretion. However, the chronic consumption of arginine has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether chronic arginine supplementation associated with exercise training would have a beneficial impact on insulin sensitivity...
December 15, 2017: Life Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28965198/time-course-of-recovery-following-resistance-training-leading-or-not-to-failure
#10
Ricardo Morán-Navarro, Carlos E Pérez, Ricardo Mora-Rodríguez, Ernesto de la Cruz-Sánchez, Juan José González-Badillo, Luis Sánchez-Medina, Jesús G Pallarés
PURPOSE: To describe the acute and delayed time course of recovery following resistance training (RT) protocols differing in the number of repetitions (R) performed in each set (S) out of the maximum possible number (P). METHODS: Ten resistance-trained men undertook three RT protocols [S × R(P)]: (1) 3 × 5(10), (2) 6 × 5(10), and (3) 3 × 10(10) in the bench press (BP) and full squat (SQ) exercises. Selected mechanical and biochemical variables were assessed at seven time points (from - 12 h to + 72 h post-exercise)...
December 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28956640/are-higher-blood-flow-restriction-pressures-more-beneficial-when-lower-loads-are-used
#11
S J Dankel, M B Jessee, S L Buckner, J G Mouser, K T Mattocks, J P Loenneke
The application of blood flow restriction during low-load resistance exercise has been shown to induce muscle growth with high or low restriction pressures, however, loads lower than 20% one-repetition maximum (1RM) remain unexplored. Fourteen trained individuals completed six elbow flexion protocols involving three different loads (10%, 15%, and 20% 1RM) each of which was performed with either a low (40% arterial occlusion) or high (80% arterial occlusion) pressure. Pre- and post-measurements of surface electromyography (sEMG), isometric torque, and muscle thickness were analyzed...
September 1, 2017: Physiology International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28878131/physiological-adaptations-to-resistance-exercise-as-a-function-of-age
#12
Bethan E Phillips, John P Williams, Paul L Greenhaff, Kenneth Smith, Philip J Atherton
BACKGROUND: The impact of resistance exercise training (RE-T) across the life span is poorly defined. METHODS: To resolve this, we recruited three distinct age cohorts of young (18-28 years; n = 11), middle-aged (45-55 years; n = 20), and older (nonsarcopenic; 65-75 years; n = 17) individuals to a cross-sectional intervention study. All subjects participated in 20 weeks of fully supervised whole-body progressive RE-T, undergoing assessment of body composition, muscle and vascular function, and metabolic health biomarkers before and after RE-T...
September 7, 2017: JCI Insight
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28834248/high-doses-of-anti-inflammatory-drugs-compromise-muscle-strength-and-hypertrophic-adaptations-to-resistance-training-in-young-adults
#13
M Lilja, M Mandić, W Apró, M Melin, K Olsson, S Rosenborg, T Gustafsson, T R Lundberg
AIMS: This study tested the hypothesis that high doses of anti-inflammatory drugs would attenuate the adaptive response to resistance training compared with low doses. METHODS: Healthy men and women (aged 18-35 years) were randomly assigned to daily consumption of ibuprofen (IBU; 1200 mg; n = 15) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 75 mg; n = 16) for 8 weeks. During this period, subjects completed supervised knee-extensor resistance training where one leg was subjected to training with maximal volitional effort in each repetition using a flywheel ergometer (FW), while the other leg performed conventional (work-matched across groups) weight-stack training (WS)...
August 21, 2017: Acta Physiologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28819744/correlations-do-not-show-cause-and-effect-not-even-for-changes-in-muscle-size-and-strength
#14
Scott J Dankel, Samuel L Buckner, Matthew B Jessee, J Grant Mouser, Kevin T Mattocks, Takashi Abe, Jeremy P Loenneke
It is well known that resistance exercise results in increased muscle strength, but the cause of the improvement is not well understood. It is generally thought that initial increases in strength are caused by neurological factors, before being predominantly driven by increases in muscle size. Despite this hypothesis, there is currently no direct evidence that training-induced increases in muscle size contribute to training-induced increases in muscle strength. The evidence used to support this hypothesis is exclusively correlational analyses and these are often an afterthought using data collected to answer a different question of interest...
August 17, 2017: Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28801668/exercise-leads-to-unfavourable-cardiac-remodelling-and-enhanced-metabolic-homeostasis-in-obese-mice-with-cardiac-and-skeletal-muscle-autophagy-deficiency
#15
Zhen Yan, Ana Kronemberger, Jay Blomme, Jarrod A Call, Hannah M Caster, Renata O Pereira, Henan Zhao, Vitor U de Melo, Rhianna C Laker, Mei Zhang, Vitor A Lira
Autophagy is stimulated by exercise in several tissues; yet the role of skeletal and cardiac muscle-specific autophagy on the benefits of exercise training remains incompletely understood. Here, we determined the metabolic impact of exercise training in obese mice with cardiac and skeletal muscle disruption of the Autophagy related 7 gene (Atg7(h&mKO)). Muscle autophagy deficiency did not affect glucose clearance and exercise capacity in lean adult mice. High-fat diet in sedentary mice led to endoplasmic reticulum stress and aberrant mitochondrial protein expression in autophagy-deficient skeletal and cardiac muscles...
August 11, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28699923/the-effects-of-moderate-versus-high-load-resistance-training-on-muscle-growth-body-composition-and-performance-in-collegiate-women
#16
Jason M Cholewa, Fabricio E Rossi, Christopher MacDonald, Amy Hewins, Samantha Gallo, Ashley Micenski, Layne Norton, Bill I Campbell
Twenty young women (20.3+1.5 years, 164+6 cm, 68.7+13.8 kg) without prior structured resistance training experience were recruited for this study. Body composition (BodPod), compartmental water (Bioelectrical Impedance), 7-site skinfold, and arm and thigh CSA were assessed pre- and post- 8 week training. Performance testing consisted of vertical jump, 3 kg chest pass initial velocity, squat 1RM and overhead press 1RM. Following 2 weeks of familiarization training, subjects were matched for body composition and relative squat strength, and randomly assigned to either a high- (HL: n=10; 4 sets of 5-7 repetitions) or moderate-load (ML: n=10; 2 sets of 10-14 repetitions) group that completed 6-7 exercises per day performed to momentary muscular failure...
June 2, 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28630576/no-effect-of-a-whey-growth-factor-extract-during-resistance-training-on-strength-body-composition-or-hypertrophic-gene-expression-in-resistance-trained-young-men
#17
Michael J Dale, Alison M Coates, Peter R C Howe, Grant R Tomkinson, Matthew T Haren, Andrew Brown, Marissa Caldow, David Cameron-Smith, Jonathan D Buckley
Growth factors can be isolated from bovine milk to form a whey growth factor extract (WGFE). This study examined whether WGFE promoted activation of the AKT/mTOR pathway enabling increased lean tissue mass and strength in resistance trained men. Forty six men with >6 months of resistance training (RT) experience performed 12 weeks of RT. Participants consumed 20 g/day of whey protein and were randomised to receive either 1.6 g WGFE/day (WGFE; n = 22) or 1.6 g cellulose/day (control, CONT; n = 24). The primary outcome was leg press one-repetition maximum (LP1-RM) which was assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks...
June 2017: Journal of Sports Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543604/muscle-growth-to-infinity-and-beyond
#18
REVIEW
Brittany R Counts, Samuel L Buckner, J Grant Mouser, Scott J Dankel, Matthew B Jessee, Kevin T Mattocks, Jeremy P Loenneke
Strength increases following training are thought to be influenced first by neural adaptions and second by large contributions from muscle growth. This is based largely on the idea that muscle growth is a slow process and that a plateau in muscle growth would substantially hinder long-term increases in strength. This Review examines the literature to determine the time course of skeletal muscle growth in the upper and lower body and to determine whether and when muscle growth plateaus. Studies were included if they had at least 3 muscle size time points, involved participants 18 years or older, and used a resistance training protocol...
May 23, 2017: Muscle & Nerve
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526870/time-course-responses-of-circulating-micrornas-to-three-resistance-training-protocols-in-healthy-young-men
#19
Shufang Cui, Biao Sun, Xin Yin, Xia Guo, Dingming Chao, Chunni Zhang, Chen-Yu Zhang, Xi Chen, Jizheng Ma
Circulating microRNAs (c-miRNAs) in human plasma have been described as a potential marker of exercise. The present study investigated the effects of three acute resistance training (RT) protocols on the time-course changes of the c-miRNAs profiles in young males. The subjects (n = 45) were randomly divided into three groups: muscular strength endurance (SE), muscular hypertrophy (MH) and maximum strength (MS). Venous blood samples were obtained before exercise and immediately, 1 h and 24 h after each RT protocol to assess the following biological parameters: c-miRNAs, anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammatory cytokines and muscle damage markers...
May 19, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28493406/beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate-supplementation-and-skeletal-muscle-in-healthy-and-muscle-wasting-conditions
#20
REVIEW
Milan Holeček
Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) is a metabolite of the essential amino acid leucine that has been reported to have anabolic effects on protein metabolism. The aims of this article were to summarize the results of studies of the effects of HMB on skeletal muscle and to examine the evidence for the rationale to use HMB as a nutritional supplement to exert beneficial effects on muscle mass and function in various conditions of health and disease. The data presented here indicate that the beneficial effects of HMB have been well characterized in strength-power and endurance exercise...
August 2017: Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle
keyword
keyword
5374
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"