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renal disease

Ryan A Durfee, Scott A Sabo, G Douglas Letson, Odion Binitie, David Cheong
Metastatic lesions of the acetabulum can be painful and debilitating. First-line treatment is multimodal and consists of disease-specific chemotherapy, osteoclastic inhibitors, analgesics, and radiation therapy. When these therapies fail, surgical intervention usually is indicated and varies from regional defect stabilization to large periacetabular reconstructions that are demanding procedures with high rates of complications. Percutaneous cement augmentation (acetabuloplasty) of lesions in selected patients has been explored as a less invasive method of lesional control...
October 25, 2016: Orthopedics
Emilie Boissier, Olivier Mir, Antoine Hollebecque, Hassan Izzedine, Stéphane Ederhy, Anas Gazzah, Rastislav Bahleda, Christophe Massard, Isabelle Macquin-Mavier, Christophe Tournigand, Jean-Philippe Spano, Jean-Charles Soria, Benoît Rousseau
Purpose Renal toxicities are common with angiogenesis multikinase inhibitors (AMKI), and can be limiting in phase I trials. Factors associated with such toxicities are poorly known. The aims of this exploratory study were to describe renovascular toxicities associated with AMKI, impact on drug development and to identify baseline parameters associated with the occurrence of renal toxicities in phase I trials. Methods Consecutive patients treated with AMKI in Gustave Roussy phase I unit between October 2005 and August 2013 were included...
October 25, 2016: Investigational New Drugs
Teresa M Seccia, Brasilina Caroccia, Lorenzo A Calò
Hypertensive kidney disease classically entails nephroangiosclerosis and hyalinosis with glomerular damage. However, in recent years, several evidences showed that high blood pressure also injures tubular cells, inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Recently investigated mechanisms are also podocyte effacement and loss, which lead to denudation of the glomerular basement membrane and focal adhesion of the tufts to the Bowman's capsule, with reduced filtration and scars...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Enrico Girardi, Antonella d'Arminio Monforte, Laura Camoni, Patrizio Pezzotti, Giovanni Guaraldi, Adriana Ammassari, Andrea Antinori, Stefano Bonora, Cristina Mussini, Antonella Cingolani, Giulio Maria Corbelli, Silvia Adami, Luca Degli Esposti, Margherita Andretta
HIV disease has dramatically changed in the last two decades from a progressive, lethal disease to a chronic manageable condition. These changes are due to the availability of potent antiretroviral combination therapy, which also have the potential to contribute significantly to the control of the epidemic. Among persons living with HIV, incidence of immunosuppression-related opportunistic illnesses has clearly decreased, while an increase was observed in the prevalence of age-related noncommunicable comorbidities, including cardiovascular, metabolic, renal, bone and hepatic disease, due to chronic inflammatory state and to an overall aging of the population of persons with HIV...
October 2016: Recenti Progressi in Medicina
Michael Christensen, Jonas B Jensen, Steen Jakobsen, Niels Jessen, Jørgen Frøkiær, Bruce E Kemp, Allison L Marciszyn, Hui Li, Núria M Pastor-Soler, Kenneth R Hallows, Rikke Nørregaard
The type-2 diabetes drug metformin has proven to have protective effects in several renal disease models. Here, we investigated the protective effects in a 3-day unilateral ureteral obstruction (3dUUO) mouse model. Compared with controls, ureteral obstructed animals displayed increased tubular damage and inflammation. Metformin treatment attenuated inflammation, increased the anti-oxidative response and decreased tubular damage. Hepatic metformin uptake depends on the expression of organic cation transporters (OCTs)...
October 26, 2016: Scientific Reports
Aki Kiuchi, Yasushi Ohashi, Reibin Tai, Toshiyuki Aoki, Sonoo Mizuiri, Toyoko Ogura, Atsushi Aikawa, Ken Sakai
Reduced dietary protein intake in malnourished patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be associated with adverse clinical outcomes, which may mask any efficacy of a low-protein diet. The study included 126 patients with CKD who attended a dedicated dietary counseling clinic in 2005-2009 and were systematically followed until January 2015. Of these patients, 20 (15.9%) had moderate or severe nutrition-related risk of geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) < 92; these patients were more likely to be older, have a greater proteinuria, and have lower body mass index and serum albumin concentration...
October 23, 2016: Nutrients
Tevfik Ecder, Cengiz Utas, Kenan Ates, Brian Bieber, Bruce M Robinson, Ronald L Pisoni, Gültekin Süleymanlar
Introduction Turkey has one of the largest treated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patient populations in Europe (N = 66,711). In 2013, the international Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), a prospective study of hemodialysis (HD) practices and outcomes, initiated data collection in Turkey. Here we provide comparisons of HD patients in DOPPS-Turkey with other international regions and with patients in the Registry of Turkish Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation. Methods DOPPS-Turkey study sites were randomly selected from all Turkish HD units treating ≥25 in-center chronic HD patients...
October 25, 2016: Hemodialysis International
Yoichi Iwafuchi, Tetsuo Morioka, Yuko Oyama, Kandai Nozu, Kazumoto Iijima, Ichiei Narita
Many types of inherited renal diseases have ocular features that occasionally support a diagnosis. The following study describes an unusual example of a 40-year-old woman with granular corneal dystrophy type II complicated by renal involvement. These two conditions may coincidentally coexist; however, there are some reports that demonstrate an association between renal involvement and granular corneal dystrophy type II. Granular corneal dystrophy type II is caused by a mutation in the transforming growth factor-β-induced (TGFBI) gene...
September 2016: Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis
Ryan Kunjal, Rabie Adam-Eldien, Raafat Makary, Francois Jo-Hoy, Charles W Heilig
We report the case of a 22-year-old African American female who presented to another facility for routine follow-up in the 34th week of pregnancy with lower extremity swelling and nephrotic-range proteinuria. Although she was normotensive, it was initially thought that she had preeclampsia. She was monitored carefully and delivery was induced at 37 weeks of gestation. She was transferred to our hospital, where she was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) based on clinical and laboratory criteria...
September 2016: Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis
Alexander G Raufi, Shruti Scott, Omar Darwish, Kevin Harley, Kanwarpal Kahlon, Sheetal Desai, Yuxin Lu, Minh-Ha Tran
Among the spectrum of disease manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, lupus nephritis is particularly concerning due to the potential for renal failure. This autoimmune attack may not, however, be limited to the kidney and is increasingly being recognized as a trigger for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS). Atypical HUS falls under the spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) - a group of disorders characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and end organ damage...
September 28, 2016: Hematology Reports
Marie Mitani, Munehiro Furuichi, Satoshi Narumi, Tomonobu Hasegawa, Motoko Chiga, Shinichi Uchida, Seiji Sato
Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHA II) is a renal tubular disease that causes hyperkalemia, hypertension, and metabolic acidosis. Mutations in four genes (WNK4, WNK1, KLHL3, and CUL3) are known to cause PHA II. We report a patient with PHA II carrying a KLHL3 mutation, who also had congenital hypopituitarism. The patient, a 3-yr-old boy, experienced loss of consciousness at age 10 mo. He exhibited growth failure, hypertension, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed him as having PHA II because he had low plasma renin activity with normal plasma aldosterone level and a low transtubular potassium gradient...
October 2016: Clinical Pediatric Endocrinology: Case Reports and Clinical Investigations: Official Journal of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology
Benjamin A Steinberg
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and conveys a significant risk of morbidity and mortality due to related stroke and systemic embolism. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the mainstay of thromboembolism prevention and management of anticoagulation can be challenging. For patients without significant valvular disease, decisions around anticoagulation therapy are first based on the presence of additional stroke risk factors, as measured by the CHA2DS2-VASc score. Patients with increased CHA2DS2-VASc scores (by regional guidelines) should next be evaluated to determine if they are candidates for non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) therapy...
October 25, 2016: Blood
Robert I Menzies, Frederick W Tam, Robert J Unwin, Matthew A Bailey
Nucleotides are key subunits for nucleic acids and provide energy for intracellular metabolism. They can also be released from cells to act physiologically as extracellular messengers or pathologically as danger signals. Extracellular nucleotides stimulate membrane receptors in the P2 and P1 family. P2X are ATP-activated cation channels; P2Y and P1 are G-protein coupled receptors activated by ATP, ADP, UTP, and UDP in the case of P2 or adenosine for P1. Renal P2 receptors influence both vascular contractility and tubular function...
October 22, 2016: Kidney International
Julien Aniort, Anaïs Poyet, Jean-Louis Kemeny, Carole Philipponnet, Anne-Elisabeth Heng
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major complication in patients with liver disease. Although hepatorenal syndrome is frequently involved, bile cast nephropathy, characterized by tubular bile cast formation, has been scarcely described in the setting of severe liver failure. Few renal histology studies are available in these patients. We describe a case of bile cast nephropathy in a patient with obstructive cholestasis caused by stones in the common bile duct. The kidney biopsy confirmed this diagnosis, with several green casts in tubular lumens, tubular injury, and bilirubin composition of the tubular casts with Hall stain...
October 22, 2016: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Douglas Y Mah, Divya Shakti, Kimberlee Gauvreau, Steven D Colan, Mark E Alexander, Dominic J Abrams, David W Brown
Left atrial (LA) dilation has been shown to be associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) in the adult population, with some studies indicating that larger LAs are more prone to AF recurrence. The relation of LA size to AF in the pediatric and young adult population has not been investigated. In this study, all pediatric patients (aged ≤22 years) who presented to Boston Children's Hospital from January 2002 to December 2012 with AF were reviewed. Patients with significant congenital heart disease, cardiomyopathies, proven channelopathies, previous cardiac surgery, end-stage renal disease, or severe lung disease/cystic fibrosis were excluded...
September 30, 2016: American Journal of Cardiology
Jürgen Dieker, Jo H Berden, Marinka Bakker, Jean-Paul Briand, Sylviane Muller, Reinhard Voll, Christopher Sjöwall, Martin Herrmann, Luuk B Hilbrands, Johan van der Vlag
Persistent exposure of the immune system to death cell debris leads to autoantibodies against chromatin in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Deposition of anti-chromatin/chromatin complexes can instigate inflammation in multiple organs including the kidney. Previously we identified specific cell death-associated histone modifications as targets of autoantibodies in SLE. In this study we addressed, in a large cohort of SLE patients and controls, the question whether plasma reactivities with specific histone peptides associated with serology and clinical features...
2016: PloS One
Michelle R Hoffmann, Peter A Senior, Stephanie T Jackson, Guylaine Ferland, Nancy Presse, Kailash Jindal, Ping Li, Abeer S Alzaben, Diana R Mager
PURPOSE: Patients with diabetes (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for suboptimal bone health. The study objective was to investigate the relationships between vitamin D (vitD), vitamin K1 (vitK1), and calcium intake with bone mineral density (BMD) and vitamin D status in an ambulatory population with DM and CKD. METHODS: Adults (age 18-80 years; n = 62) with DM and CKD (stages 1-4) were recruited from the Northern Alberta Renal Program...
October 25, 2016: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
Johan De Meester
From late nineteen nineties, the higher number of suitable renal transplant candidates has forced the transplant community to re-explore the whole spectrum of deceased donors after brain death (DBD) as well as after cardiac death (DCD); in practice, donors of older age and donors with more chronic diseases or "medical complexities". This new kidney donor population - finally defined as extended criteria donors (ECD) - currently comprises on average 20 to 25%. In his seminal paper in 2003 on the introduction of ECD in the US, Metzger et al...
October 25, 2016: Transplant International: Official Journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation
Xiuli Zhang, Dan Liang, Xu Lian, Zhi-Hong Chi, Xuemei Wang, Yue Zhao, Zhang Ping
There is emerging evidence that tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the final common pathway of the majority of chronic progressive renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Zinc, an essential dietary element, has been suggested to be important for a number of protein functions during fibrosis in vivo and in vitro. However, the effect of zinc deficiency (ZnD) on renal interstitial fibrosis in DN remains unclear. The present study investigated the effect and the underlying mechanisms of ZnD on renal interstitial fibrosis during DN using an streptozotocin‑induced model of diabetes with immunofluorescence staining and western blot analysis...
October 20, 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Nicolas Roberto Robles, Carlos Calvo, Javier Sobrino, Eugenia Espinel, Rafael Esteban, Lourdes Mateos, Juan F Macias
OBJECTIVE: The RED LEVEL study (REnal Disease: LErcanidipine Valuable Effect on urine protein Losses) directly compares, in an explorative fashion, the effects of lercanidipine + enalapril and amlodipine + enalapril combinations on renal parameters in hypertensive subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a 1 year, prospective, multi-center, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint (PROBE) study in hypertensive patients with albuminuria. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Renal function (albuminuria, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria); blood pressure...
October 2016: Current Medical Research and Opinion
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