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Intelligence in humans

Elysia Poggi Davis, Kevin Head, Claudia Buss, Curt A Sandman
Glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans) are the end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and are proposed as a key mechanism for programming fetal brain development. The present prospective longitudinal study evaluates the association between prenatal maternal cortisol concentrations and child neurodevelopment. Participants included a low risk sample of 91 mother-child pairs. Prenatal maternal plasma cortisol concentrations were measured at 19 and 31 gestational weeks. Brain development and cognitive functioning were assessed when children were 6-9 years of age...
October 15, 2016: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Yang Jie, Huarui Zhu, Xia Cao, Yue Zhang, Ning Wang, Liqun Zhang, Zhong Lin Wang
Tactile sensing is of great importance in developing human-machine interface, remote control and security systems. Here, a self-triggered alarm system based on the one-piece triboelectric nanosensor (TENS) is reported. By using nitrocellulose (NC) membrane as the triboelectric material, the as-designed TENS can not only sensitively respond to physical contacts in a self-triggered mode, but also securely detect the third-level details of latent fingerprint. The self-triggered idea based on the triboelectric nanogenerator is compatible with intelligent interactive interface...
October 21, 2016: ACS Nano
Ahmed Al-Imam, Rita Santacroce, Andres Roman-Urrestarazu, Robert Chilcott, Giuseppe Bersani, Giovanni Martinotti, Ornella Corazza
BACKGROUND: Fenetheylline, a psychostimulant drug, often branded as Captagon, is a combination of amphetamine and theophylline. Since the cessation of its legal production in 1986, counterfeited products have been produced illicitly in south-east Europe and far-east Asia. Its profitable trade has been linked to terrorist organizations, including Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. This study aims to reach up-to-date data, concerning the Captagon e-commerce and use in the Middle East...
October 21, 2016: Human Psychopharmacology
Hans Lehrach
Every human is unique. We differ in our genomes, environment, behavior, disease history, and past and current medical treatment-a complex catalog of differences that often leads to variations in the way each of us responds to a particular therapy. We argue here that true personalization of drug therapies will rely on "virtual patient" models based on a detailed characterization of the individual patient by molecular, imaging, and sensor techniques. The models will be based, wherever possible, on the molecular mechanisms of disease processes and drug action but can also expand to hybrid models including statistics/machine learning/artificial intelligence-based elements trained on available data to address therapeutic areas or therapies for which insufficient information on mechanisms is available...
September 2016: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience
Ivy Shiue
There has been a growing interest in how the built environment affects health and well-being. Housing characteristics are associated with human health while environmental chemicals could have mediated the effects. However, it is unclear if and how residence duration might have a role in health and well-being. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the associations among residence duration, common chronic diseases, and cognitive function in older adults in a national and population-based setting...
October 18, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Brian Hare
The challenge of studying human cognitive evolution is identifying unique features of our intelligence while explaining the processes by which they arose. Comparisons with nonhuman apes point to our early-emerging cooperative-communicative abilities as crucial to the evolution of all forms of human cultural cognition, including language. The human selfdomestication hypothesis proposes that these early-emerging social skills evolved when natural selection favored increased in-group prosociality over aggression in late human evolution...
October 12, 2016: Annual Review of Psychology
David Klindt, Marie Devaine, Jean Daunizeau
Mentalizing or Theory of Mind (ToM), i.e., the ability to recognize what people think or feel, is a crucial component of human social intelligence. It has been recently proposed that ToM can be decomposed into automatic and controlled neurocognitive components, where only the latter engage executive functions (e.g., working memory, inhibitory control and task switching). Critical here is the notion that such dual processes are expected to follow different developmental dynamics. In this work, we provide novel experimental evidence for this notion...
September 23, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Arti Vashist, Ajeet Kaushik, Atul Vashist, Rahul Dev Jayant, Asahi Tomitaka, Sharif Ahmad, Y K Gupta, Madhavan Nair
Since centuries, the rapid spread and cure of infectious diseases have been a major concern to the progress and survival of humans. These diseases are a global burden and the prominent cause for worldwide deaths and disabilities. Nanomedicine has emerged as the most excellent tool to eradicate and halt their spread. Various nanoformulations (NFs) using advanced nanotechnology are in demand. Recently, hydrogel and nanogel based drug delivery devices have posed new prospects to simulate the natural intelligence of various biological systems...
October 18, 2016: Biomaterials Science
Charles H Janson
There is considerable controversy about the existence, extent and adaptive value of integrated multimodal memory in non-human animals. Building on prior results showing that wild capuchin monkeys in Argentina appear to recall both the location and amount of food at patches they had previously visited, I tested whether they also track and use elapsed time as a basis for decisions about which feeding patches to visit. I presented them with an experimental array of eight feeding sites, at each of which food rewards increased with increasing elapsed time since the previous visit, similar to the pattern of ripe fruit accumulation in natural feeding trees...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Claudia Villalonga, Muhammad Asif Razzaq, Wajahat Ali Khan, Hector Pomares, Ignacio Rojas, Sungyoung Lee, Oresti Banos
Recent years have witnessed a huge progress in the automatic identification of individual primitives of human behavior, such as activities or locations. However, the complex nature of human behavior demands more abstract contextual information for its analysis. This work presents an ontology-based method that combines low-level primitives of behavior, namely activity, locations and emotions, unprecedented to date, to intelligently derive more meaningful high-level context information. The paper contributes with a new open ontology describing both low-level and high-level context information, as well as their relationships...
2016: Sensors
Manuel Suárez-Albela, Paula Fraga-Lamas, Tiago M Fernández-Caramés, Adriana Dapena, Miguel González-López
This paper presents a novel home automation system named HASITE (Home Automation System based on Intelligent Transducer Enablers), which has been specifically designed to identify and configure transducers easily and quickly. These features are especially useful in situations where many transducers are deployed, since their setup becomes a cumbersome task that consumes a significant amount of time and human resources. HASITE simplifies the deployment of a home automation system by using wireless networks and both self-configuration and self-registration protocols...
2016: Sensors
Zequn Yan, Min Xue, Qian He, Wei Lu, Zihui Meng, Dan Yan, Lili Qiu, Lijun Zhou, Yingjie Yu
A novel polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) sensing material for the detection of urine glucose was developed by embedding a two-dimensional (2-D) polystyrene crystalline colloidal array (CCA) in 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (3-APBA)-functionalized hydrogel. After adjusting the cross-linker concentration, this material showed significant sensitivity for glucose under lab conditions, the particle spacing of the PCCA changed from 917 to 824 nm (93 nm) within 3 min as the glucose concentration increased from 0 to 10 mM, and the structural color of the PCCA changed from red through orange, to green, and finally, to cyan...
September 28, 2016: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Lisa Cipolotti, Barbara Spanò, Colm Healy, Carina Tudor-Sfetea, Edgar Chan, Mark White, Francesca Biondo, John Duncan, Tim Shallice, Marco Bozzali
The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is known to make fundamental contributions to executive functions. However, the precise nature of these contributions is incompletely understood. We focused on a specific executive function, inhibition, the ability to suppress a pre-potent response. Functional imaging and animal studies have studied inhibition. However, there are only few lesion studies, typically reporting discrepant findings. For the first time, we conducted cognitive and neuroimaging investigations on patients with focal unilateral PFC lesions across two widely used inhibitory tasks requiring a verbal response: The Hayling Part 2 and Stroop Colour-Word Tests...
September 23, 2016: Neuropsychologia
Adrián Pótári, Péter P Ujma, Boris N Konrad, Lisa Genzel, Péter Simor, János Körmendi, Ferenc Gombos, Axel Steiger, Martin Dresler, Róbert Bódizs
Impaired sleep is a frequent complaint in ageing and a risk factor for many diseases. Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep EEG delta power reflects neural plasticity and, in line with age-related cognitive decline, decreases with age. Individuals with higher general intelligence are less affected by age-related cognitive decline or other disorders and have longer lifespans. We investigated the correlation between age and EEG power in 159 healthy human subjects (age range: 17-69 years), and compared an average (IQ<120; N=87) with a high (IQ≥120; N=72) intelligence subgroup...
September 23, 2016: NeuroImage
Alex Gillespie, Kevin Corti
This article examines advances in research methods that enable experimental substitution of the speaking body in unscripted face-to-face communication. A taxonomy of six hybrid social agents is presented by combining three types of bodies (mechanical, virtual, and human) with either an artificial or human speech source. Our contribution is to introduce and explore the significance of two particular hybrids: (1) the cyranoid method that enables humans to converse face-to-face through the medium of another person's body, and (2) the echoborg method that enables artificial intelligence to converse face-to-face through the medium of a human body...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
J Hogeveen, C Salvi, J Grafman
'Emotional intelligence' (EI) is one of the most highly used psychological terms in popular nomenclature, yet its construct, divergent, and predictive validities are contentiously debated. Despite this debate, the EI construct is composed of a set of emotional abilities - recognizing emotional states in the self and others, using emotions to guide thought and behavior, understanding how emotions shape behavior, and emotion regulation - that undoubtedly influence important social and personal outcomes. In this review, evidence from human lesion studies is reviewed in order to provide insight into the necessary brain regions for each of these core emotional abilities...
October 2016: Trends in Neurosciences
Andreia M Silva, José H Teixeira, Maria Ines Almeida, Raquel M Gonçalves, Mário A Barbosa, Susana G Santos
Inflammation is a complex and highly regulated biological process, crucial for a variety of functions in the human body, from host response against infectious agents to initiation of repair/regeneration of injured tissues. In the context of tissue repair, the action of different immune cell populations and their interplay with tissue specific cells, including stem cells, is still being uncovered. Extracellular Vesicles (EV) are small membrane vesicles secreted by cells in a controlled manner, which can act locally and systemically...
September 17, 2016: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Damien Jeannerat
The introduction of a universal data format to report the correlation data of 2D NMR spectra such as COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra will have a large impact on the reliability of structure determination of small organic molecules. These lists of assigned cross peaks will bridge signals found in NMR 1D and 2D spectra and the assigned chemical structure. The record could be very compact, human and computer readable so that it can be included in the supplementary material of publications and easily transferred into databases of scientific literature and chemical compounds...
September 18, 2016: Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry: MRC
Zhuo Fang, Valya Sergeeva, Laura B Ray, Jeremy Viczko, Adrian M Owen, Stuart M Fogel
Sleep spindles-short, phasic, oscillatory bursts of activity that characterize non-rapid eye movement sleep-are one of the only electrophysiological oscillations identified as a biological marker of human intelligence (e.g., cognitive abilities commonly assessed using intelligence quotient tests). However, spindles are also important for sleep maintenance and are modulated by circadian factors. Thus, the possibility remains that the relationship between spindles and intelligence quotient may be an epiphenomenon of a putative relationship between good quality sleep and cognitive ability or perhaps modulated by circadian factors such as morningness-eveningness tendencies...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Wanyuan Wang, Jiuchuan Jiang, Bo An, Yichuan Jiang, Bing Chen
Crowdsourcing has become a popular service computing paradigm for requesters to integrate the ubiquitous human-intelligence services for tasks that are difficult for computers but trivial for humans. This paper focuses on crowdsourcing complex tasks by team formation in social networks (SNs) where a requester connects to a large number of workers. A good indicator of efficient team collaboration is the social connection among workers. Most previous social team formation approaches, however, either assume that the requester can maintain information of all workers and can directly communicate with them to build teams, or assume that the workers are cooperative and be willing to join the specific team built by the requester, both of which are impractical in many real situations...
September 7, 2016: IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics
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