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Meijiao Wang, Tinghe Yu, Lina Hu, Zhi Cheng, Min Li
Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L3 (UCHL3) belongs to the group of deubiquitinating enzymes and plays a part in apoptosis of germ cells and the differentiation of spermatocytes into spermatids. However, the exact role of UCHL3 in human spermatogenesis and sperm function remains unknown. Here we examined the level and activity of UCHL3 in spermatozoa from men with asthenozoospermia (A), oligoasthenozoospermia (OA) or normozoospermia (N). Immunofluorescence indicated that UCHL3 was mainly localized in the acrosome and throughout the flagella, and western blotting revealed a lower level in A or OA compared with N (p < 0...
2016: PloS One
Pierre F Ray, Aminata Toure, Metzler-Guillemain, Michael J Mitchell, Christophe Arnoult, Charles Coutton
Infertility, defined by the inability of conceiving a child after one year is estimated to concern approximately 50 million couples worldwide. As the male gamete is readily accessible and can be studied by a simple spermogram it is easier to subcategorize male than female infertility. Subjects with a specific sperm phenotype are more likely to have a common origin thus facilitating the search for causal factors. Male infertility is believed to be often multifactorial and caused by both genetic and extrinsinc factors, but severe cases of male infertility are likely to have a predominant genetic etiology...
October 25, 2016: Clinical Genetics
Ke-Chuan Wang, Chih-Hung Huang, Shih-Min Ding, Ching-Kuo Chen, Hsu-Wei Fang, Ming-Te Huang, Shiuh-Bin Fang
The yqiC gene of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) regulates bacterial growth at different temperatures and mice survival after infection. However, the role of yqiC in bacterial colonization and host immunity remains unknown. We infected human LS174T, Caco-2, HeLa, and THP-1 cells with S. Typhimurium wild-type SL1344, its yqiC mutant, and its complemented strain. Bacterial colonization and internalization in the four cell lines significantly reduced on yqiC depletion. Post-infection production of interleukin-8 and human β-defensin-3 in LS174T cells significantly reduced because of yqiC deleted in S...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Katsutoshi Mizuno, Erin E Dymek, Elizabeth F Smith
The complex waveforms characteristic of motile eukaryotic cilia and flagella are produced by the temporally and spatially regulated action of multiple dynein subforms generating sliding between subsets of axonemal microtubules. Multiple protein complexes have been identified that are associated with the doublet microtubules and that mediate regulatory signals between key axonemal structures, such as the radial spokes and central apparatus, and the dynein arm motors; these complexes include the N-DRC, MIA and CSC complexes...
October 22, 2016: Cytoskeleton
Thomas D Loreng, Elizabeth F Smith
The motile cilium is a complex organelle that is typically comprised of a 9+2 microtubule skeleton; nine doublet microtubules surrounding a pair of central singlet microtubules. Like the doublet microtubules, the central microtubules form a scaffold for the assembly of protein complexes forming an intricate network of interconnected projections. The central microtubules and associated structures are collectively referred to as the central apparatus (CA). Studies using a variety of experimental approaches and model organisms have led to the discovery of a number of highly conserved protein complexes, unprecedented high-resolution views of projection structure, and new insights into regulation of dynein-driven microtubule sliding...
October 21, 2016: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology
Pierre Dehoux, Jean Christophe Marvaud, Amr Abouelleil, Ashlee M Earl, Thierry Lambert, Catherine Dauga
BACKGROUND: Clostridium bolteae and Clostridium clostridioforme, previously included in the complex C. clostridioforme in the group Clostridium XIVa, remain difficult to distinguish by phenotypic methods. These bacteria, prevailing in the human intestinal microbiota, are opportunistic pathogens with various drug susceptibility patterns. In order to better characterize the two species and to obtain information on their antibiotic resistance genes, we analyzed the genomes of six strains of C...
October 21, 2016: BMC Genomics
Takashi Nakada, Masaru Tomita
New strains of wall-less unicellular volvocalean flagellate were isolated from a freshwater environment in Japan. Observations of the alga, described here as Hapalochloris nozakii Nakada, gen. et sp. nov., were made under light, fluorescence, and electron microscopes. Each vegetative cell had two flagella, four contractile vacuoles, and a spirally furrowed cup-shaped chloroplast with an axial pyrenoid, and mitochondria located in the furrows. Based on the morphology, H. nozakii was distinguished from other known wall-less volvocalean flagellates...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Phycology
Oihane Irazoki, Jesús Aranda, Timo Zimmermann, Susana Campoy, Jordi Barbé
In addition to its role in DNA damage repair and recombination, the RecA protein, through its interaction with CheW, is involved in swarming motility, a form of flagella-dependent movement across surfaces. In order to better understand how SOS response modulates swarming, in this work the location of RecA and CheW proteins within the swarming cells has been studied by using super-resolution microscopy. Further, and after in silico docking studies, the specific RecA and CheW regions associated with the RecA-CheW interaction have also been confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation techniques...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Kazuo Kobayashi, Yu Kanesaki, Hirofumi Yoshikawa
Bacteria have developed various motility mechanisms to adapt to a variety of solid surfaces. A rhizosphere isolate, Paenibacillus sp. NAIST15-1, exhibited unusual motility behavior. When spotted onto 1.5% agar media, Paenibacillus sp. formed many colonies, each of which moved around actively at a speed of 3.6 μm/sec. As their density increased, each moving colony began to spiral, finally forming a static round colony. Despite its unusual motility behavior, draft genome sequencing revealed that both the composition and organization of flagellar genes in Paenibacillus sp...
October 2016: PLoS Genetics
Grzegorz Fila, Anna Kawiak, Mariusz Grinholc
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the most common pathogens responsible for both acute and chronic infections of high incidence and severity. Additionally, P. aeruginosa resistance to conventional antimicrobials has increased rapidly over the past decade. Therefore, it is crucial to explore new therapeutic options, particularly options that specifically target the pathogenic mechanisms of this microbe. The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to cause disease is dependent upon the production of agents termed 'virulence factors', and approaches to mitigate these agents have gained increasing attention as new antibacterial strategies...
October 20, 2016: Virulence
Olga Besharova, Verena M Suchanek, Raimo Hartmann, Knut Drescher, Victor Sourjik
Many bacteria primarily exist in nature as structured multicellular communities, so called biofilms. Biofilm formation is a highly regulated process that includes the transition from the motile planktonic to sessile biofilm lifestyle. Cellular differentiation within a biofilm is a commonly accepted concept but it remains largely unclear when, where and how exactly such differentiation arises. Here we used fluorescent transcriptional reporters to quantitatively analyze spatio-temporal expression patterns of several groups of genes during the formation of submerged Escherichia coli biofilms in an open static system...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Alejandro Romero, Paolo R Saraceni, Susana Merino, Antonio Figueras, Juan M Tomás, Beatriz Novoa
The selection of an experimental animal model is of great importance in the study of bacterial virulence factors. Here, a bath infection of zebrafish larvae is proposed as an alternative model to study the virulence factors of Aeromonas hydrophila. Intraperitoneal infections in mice and trout were compared with bath infections in zebrafish larvae using specific mutants. The great advantage of this model is that bath immersion mimics the natural route of infection, and injury to the tail also provides a natural portal of entry for the bacteria...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Hanan R Shehata, Cassandra L Ettinger, Jonathan A Eisen, Manish N Raizada
Endophytes are microbes that inhabit internal plant tissues without causing disease. Some endophytes are known to combat pathogens. The corn (maize) landrace Chapalote has been grown continuously by subsistence farmers in the Americas since 1000 BC, without the use of fungicides, and the crop remains highly valued by farmers, in part for its natural tolerance to pests. We hypothesized that the pathogen tolerance of Chapalote may, in part, be due to assistance from its endophytes. We previously identified a bacterial endophyte from Chapalote seeds, Burkholderia gladioli strain 3A12, for its ability to combat a diversity of crop pathogens, including Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, the most important fungal disease of creeping bentgrass, a relative of maize used here as a model system...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Irfan Ahmad, Syed Fazle Rouf, Lei Sun, Annika Cimdins, Sulman Shafeeq, Soazig Le Guyon, Marco Schottkowski, Mikael Rhen, Ute Römling
BACKGROUND: Cellulose, a 1,4 beta-glucan polysaccharide, is produced by a variety of organisms including bacteria. Although the production of cellulose has a high biological, ecological and economical impact, regulatory mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis are mostly unknown. Family eight cellulases are regularly associated with cellulose biosynthesis operons in bacteria; however, their function is poorly characterized. In this study, we analysed the role of the cellulase BcsZ encoded by the bcsABZC cellulose biosynthesis operon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S...
October 19, 2016: Microbial Cell Factories
Feifei Cheng, Anzhou Ma, Guoqiang Zhuang, Rupert G Fray
In order to cope with pathogens, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense pathogenic attacks and to induce defence responses. The N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in bacteria regulates diverse physiological processes including those involved in pathogenicity. In this work, we study the interactions between AHL-producing transgenic tobacco plants and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 11528 (P. syringae 11528). Both a reduced incidence of disease and decrease in the growth of P...
October 18, 2016: Molecular Plant Pathology
Mehdi Molaei, Jian Sheng
Understanding how bacteria move close to a surface under various stimuli is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial transport and migration. While prior studies focus on interactions between single stimulus and bacterial suspension, we emphasize on compounding effects of flow shear and solid surfaces on bacterial motility, especially reorientation and tumble. We have applied microfluidics and digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>10(5)) of 3D Escherichia coli trajectories near a surface under various flow shear...
October 18, 2016: Scientific Reports
Laura M Faure, Jean-Bernard Fiche, Leon Espinosa, Adrien Ducret, Vivek Anantharaman, Jennifer Luciano, Sébastien Lhospice, Salim T Islam, Julie Tréguier, Mélanie Sotes, Erkin Kuru, Michael S Van Nieuwenhze, Yves V Brun, Olivier Théodoly, Aravind L, Marcelo Nollmann, Tâm Mignot
Various rod-shaped bacteria mysteriously glide on surfaces in the absence of appendages such as flagella or pili. In the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, a putative gliding motility machinery (Agl-Glt) localizes to so-called Focal Adhesion sites (FA) that form stationary contact points with the underlying surface. We discovered that the Agl-Glt machinery contains an inner-membrane motor complex that moves intracellularly along a right-handed helical path, and when it becomes stationary at FA sites, it powers a left-handed rotation of the cell around its long axis...
October 5, 2016: Nature
Miguel Pinto, Vítor Borges, Minia Antelo, Miguel Pinheiro, Alexandra Nunes, Jacinta Azevedo, Maria José Borrego, Joana Mendonça, Dina Carpinteiro, Luís Vieira, João Paulo Gomes
Insights into the genomic adaptive traits of Treponema pallidum, the causative bacterium of syphilis, have long been hampered due to the absence of in vitro culture models and the constraints associated with its propagation in rabbits. Here, we have bypassed the culture bottleneck by means of a targeted strategy never applied to uncultivable bacterial human pathogens to directly capture whole-genome T. pallidum data in the context of human infection. This strategy has unveiled a scenario of discreet T. pallidum interstrain single-nucleotide-polymorphism-based microevolution, contrasting with a rampant within-patient genetic heterogeneity mainly targeting multiple phase-variable loci and a major antigen-coding gene (tprK)...
October 17, 2016: Nature Microbiology
Pardeep Kumar, F Matthew Kuhlmann, Kirandeep Bhullar, Hyungjun Yang, Bruce A Vallance, Lijun Xia, Qingwei Luo, James M Fleckenstein
At present, there is no vaccine for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), an important cause of diarrheal illness. Nevertheless, recent microbial pathogenesis studies have identified a number of molecules produced by ETEC that contribute to its virulence and which provide novel antigenic targets to complement canonical vaccine approaches. EtpA is a secreted two-partner adhesin, that is conserved within the ETEC pathovar. EtpA interacts with the tips of ETEC flagella to promote bacterial adhesion, toxin delivery and intestinal colonization by forming molecular bridges between the bacteria and the epithelial surface...
October 10, 2016: Infection and Immunity
Stephanie Höhn, Armin Hallmann
BACKGROUND: The multicellular volvocine alga Pleodorina is intermediate in organismal complexity between its unicellular relative, Chlamydomonas, and its multicellular relative, Volvox, which shows complete division of labor between different cell types. The volvocine green microalgae form a group of genera closely related to the genus Volvox within the order Volvocales (Chlorophyta). Embryos of multicellular volvocine algae consist of a cellular monolayer that, depending on the species, is either bowl-shaped or comprises a sphere...
October 13, 2016: BMC Developmental Biology
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