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Transcriptome, plant

Yuanli Luo, Daiwen Dong, Yu Su, Xuyi Wang, Yumei Peng, Jiang Peng, Changyong Zhou
Mustard clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is a serious disease that affects Brassica juncea var. tumida Tsen, a mustard plant that is the raw material for a traditional fermented food manufactured in Chongqing, China. In our laboratory, we screened the antagonistic bacteria Zhihengliuella aestuarii against P. brassicae. To better understand the biocontrol mechanism, three transcriptome analyses of B. juncea var. tumida Tsen were conducted using Illumina HiSeq 4000, one from B. juncea only inoculated with P...
March 22, 2018: Functional & Integrative Genomics
Johana Madroñero, Silas P Rodrigues, Tathiana F S Antunes, Paolla M V Abreu, José A Ventura, A Alberto R Fernandes, Patricia Machado Bueno Fernandes
Global gene expression analysis indicates host stress responses, mainly those mediated by SA, associated to the tolerance to sticky disease symptoms at pre-flowering stage in Carica papaya. Carica papaya plants develop the papaya sticky disease (PSD) as a result of the combined infection of papaya meleira virus (PMeV) and papaya meleira virus 2 (PMeV2), or PMeV complex. PSD symptoms appear only after C. papaya flowers. To understand the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon, the global gene expression patterns of PMeV complex-infected C...
March 21, 2018: Plant Cell Reports
Qi Zhao, Rui Li, Yang Zhang, Kejia Huang, Wenguo Wang, Jian Li
The bulbs of Fritillaria cirrhosa is wildly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat lung-related disease, which has recently been found to have antitussive, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive and anti-tumor activity. Steroidal alkaloids are the major effective ingredients of F. cirrhosa . In the current study, we demonstrated an efficient strategy for F. cirrhosa bulb regeneration in vitro by cytokinin/auxin induction. Our data showed that the regenerated bulbs accumulated higher alkaloid content that the wild ones...
April 2018: 3 Biotech
Sumetha Kannan, Gillian Halter, Tanya Renner, Elizabeth R Waters
Plants have evolved a variety of mechanisms to respond and adapt to abiotic stress. High temperature stress induces the heat shock response. During the heat shock response a large number of genes are up-regulated, many of which code for chaperone proteins that prevent irreversible protein aggregation and cell death. However, it is clear that heat shock is not the only mechanism involved in the plant heat stress response. Alternative splicing (AS) is also important during heat stress since this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism can produce significant transcriptome and proteome variation...
March 2018: AoB Plants
Aparajita Banerjee, Björn Hamberger
Catalyzing stereo- and regio-specific oxidation of inert hydrocarbon backbones, and a range of more exotic reactions inherently difficult in formal chemical synthesis, cytochromes P450 (P450s) offer outstanding potential for biotechnological engineering. Plants and their dazzling diversity of specialized metabolites have emerged as rich repository for functional P450s with the advances of deep transcriptomics and genome wide discovery. P450s are of outstanding interest for understanding chemical diversification throughout evolution, for gaining mechanistic insights through the study of their structure-function relationship, and for exploitation in Synthetic Biology...
2018: Phytochemistry Reviews: Proceedings of the Phytochemical Society of Europe
Héctor Cervera, Silvia Ambrós, Guillermo P Bernet, Guillermo Rodrigo, Santiago F Elena
Determining the fitness of viral genotypes has become a standard practice in virology as it is essential to evaluate their evolutionary potential. Darwinian fitness, defined as the advantage of a given genotype with respect to a reference, is a complex property that captures, in a single figure, differences in performance at every stage of viral infection. To what extent does viral fitness result from specific molecular interactions with host factors and regulatory networks during infection? Can we identify host genes in functional classes whose expression depends on viral fitness? Here, we compared the transcriptomes of tobacco plants infected with seven genotypes of tobacco etch potyvirus (TEV) that differ in fitness...
March 19, 2018: Molecular Biology and Evolution
Ayyappa Kumar Sista Kameshwar, Wensheng Qin
To understand the common gene expression patterns employed by P. placenta during lignocellulose degradation, we have retrieved genome wide transcriptome datasets from NCBI GEO database and analyzed using customized analysis pipeline. We have retrieved the top differentially expressed genes and compared the common significant genes among two different growth conditions. Genes encoding for cellulolytic (GH1, GH3, GH5, GH12, GH16, GH45) and hemicellulolytic (GH10, GH27, GH31, GH35, GH47, GH51, GH55, GH78, GH95) glycoside hydrolase classes were commonly up regulated among all the datasets...
2018: International Journal of Biological Sciences
Joseph M Varberg, Isabelle Coppens, Gustavo Arrizabalaga, Rajshekhar Y Gaji
In the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii , protein kinases have been shown to play key roles in regulating parasite motility, invasion, replication, egress, and survival within the host. The tyrosine kinase-like (TKL) family of proteins are an unexplored set of kinases in Toxoplasma Of the eight annotated TKLs in the Toxoplasma genome, a recent genome-wide loss-of-function screen showed that six are important for tachyzoite fitness. By utilizing an endogenous tagging approach, we showed that these six T...
March 20, 2018: MBio
Ethan A G Baker, Jill L Wegrzyn, Uzay U Sezen, Taylor Falk, Patricia E Maloney, Detlev R Vogler, Annette Delfino-Mix, Camille Jensen, Jeffry Mitton, Jessica Wright, Brian Knaus, Hardeep Rai, Richard Cronn, Daniel Gonzalez-Ibeas, Hans A Vasquez-Gross, Randi A Famula, Jun-Jun Liu, Lara M Kueppers, David B Neale
Conifers are the dominant plant species throughout the high latitude boreal forests as well as some lower latitude temperate forests of North America, Europe, and Asia. As such, they play an integral economic and ecological role across much of the world. This study focused on the characterization of needle transcriptomes from four ecologically important and understudied North American white pines within the Pinus subgenus Strobus. The populations of many Strobus species are challenged by native and introduced pathogens, native insects, and abiotic factors...
March 20, 2018: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
Xiaolong Li, Shutian Tao, Shuwei Wei, Meiling Ming, Xiaosan Huang, Shaoling Zhang, Jun Wu
BACKGROUND: In plants, ERF genes participate in a variety of regulatory pathways, such as plant growth and biotic and/or abiotic stress responses. Although the genome of Chinese white pear ('Dangshansuli') has been released, knowledge regarding the ERF family in pear, such as gene functions, evolutionary history and expression patterns, remains limited. RESULTS: In our study, a total of 155 members of ERF families were identified in pear (Pyrus bretschneideri). The Ka and Ks values suggested that whole-genome duplication (WGD) and dispersed duplication have effectively contributed to the expansion of the pear ERF family...
March 20, 2018: BMC Plant Biology
Elide Formentin, Cristina Sudiro, Giorgio Perin, Samantha Riccadonna, Elisabetta Barizza, Elena Baldoni, Enrico Lavezzo, Piergiorgio Stevanato, Gian Attilio Sacchi, Paolo Fontana, Stefano Toppo, Tomas Morosinotto, Michela Zottini, Fiorella Lo Schiavo
Salinity tolerance has been extensively investigated in recent years due to its agricultural importance. Several features, such as the regulation of ionic transporters and metabolic adjustments, have been identified as salt tolerance hallmarks. Nevertheless, due to the complexity of the trait, the results achieved to date have met with limited success in improving the salt tolerance of rice plants when tested in the field, thus suggesting that a better understanding of the tolerance mechanisms is still required...
2018: Frontiers in Plant Science
Zacharenia Nikitaki, Marcela Holá, Mattia Donà, Athanasia Pavlopoulou, Ioannis Michalopoulos, Karel J Angelis, Alexandros G Georgakilas, Anca Macovei, Alma Balestrazzi
Eukaryotic genome surveillance is dependent on the multiple, highly coordinated network functions of the DNA damage response (DDR). Highlighted conserved features of DDR in plants and animals represent a challenging opportunity to develop novel interdisciplinary investigations aimed at expanding the sets of DNA damage biomarkers currently available for radiation exposure monitoring (REM) in environmental and biomedical applications. In this review, common and divergent features of the most relevant DDR players in animals and plants are described, including the intriguing example of the plant and animal kingdom-specific master regulators SOG1 (suppressor of gamma response) and p53...
January 2018: Mutation Research
Ellen Young, Manus Carey, Andrew A Meharg, Caroline Meharg
BACKGROUND: Plants can adapt to edaphic stress, such as nutrient deficiency, toxicity and biotic challenges, by controlled transcriptomic responses, including microbiome interactions. Traditionally studied in model plant species with controlled microbiota inoculation treatments, molecular plant-microbiome interactions can be functionally investigated via RNA-Seq. Complex, natural plant-microbiome studies are limited, typically focusing on microbial rRNA and omitting functional microbiome investigations, presenting a fundamental knowledge gap...
March 20, 2018: Microbiome
Jing Li, Yong-Jun He, Lu Zhou, Yang Liu, Mingmin Jiang, Li Ren, Huoying Chen
BACKGROUND: The anthocyanins are highly enriched in eggplants (Solanum melongena L.) with purple peel. However, our previous study showed that anthocyanins biosynthesis in eggplant cultivar 'Lanshan Hexian' was completely regulated by light and color becomes evident at most 2 days after exposure to light. In the present investigation, transcriptome study was made to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in eggplant (Solanum melongena L...
March 20, 2018: BMC Genomics
Axel de Zélicourt, Lukas Synek, Maged M Saad, Hanin Alzubaidy, Rewaa Jalal, Yakun Xie, Cristina Andrés-Barrao, Eleonora Rolli, Florence Guerard, Kiruthiga G Mariappan, Ihsanullah Daur, Jean Colcombet, Moussa Benhamed, Thomas Depaepe, Dominique Van Der Straeten, Heribert Hirt
Several plant species require microbial associations for survival under different biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we show that Enterobacter sp. SA187, a desert plant endophytic bacterium, enhances yield of the crop plant alfalfa under field conditions as well as growth of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana in vitro, revealing a high potential of SA187 as a biological solution for improving crop production. Studying the SA187 interaction with Arabidopsis, we uncovered a number of mechanisms related to the beneficial association of SA187 with plants...
March 19, 2018: PLoS Genetics
David Lopez, Sébastien Ribeiro, Philippe Label, Boris Fumanal, Jean-Stéphane Venisse, Annegret Kohler, Ricardo R de Oliveira, Kurt Labutti, Anna Lipzen, Kathleen Lail, Diane Bauer, Robin A Ohm, Kerrie W Barry, Joseph Spatafora, Igor V Grigoriev, Francis M Martin, Valérie Pujade-Renaud
Corynespora cassiicola is an Ascomycetes fungus with a broad host range and diverse life styles. Mostly known as a necrotrophic plant pathogen, it has also been associated with rare cases of human infection. In the rubber tree, this fungus causes the Corynespora leaf fall (CLF) disease, which increasingly affects natural rubber production in Asia and Africa. It has also been found as an endophyte in South American rubber plantations where no CLF outbreak has yet occurred. The C. cassiicola species is genetically highly diverse, but no clear relationship has been evidenced between phylogenetic lineage and pathogenicity...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Michał Rurek, Magdalena Czołpińska, Tomasz Andrzej Pawłowski, Włodzimierz Krzesiński, Tomasz Spiżewski
Complex proteomic and physiological approaches for studying cold and heat stress responses in plant mitochondria are still limited. Variations in the mitochondrial proteome of cauliflower ( Brassica oleracea var. botrytis ) curds after cold and heat and after stress recovery were assayed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) in relation to mRNA abundance and respiratory parameters. Quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial proteome revealed numerous stress-affected protein spots. In cold, major downregulations in the level of photorespiratory enzymes, porine isoforms, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and some low-abundant proteins were observed...
March 16, 2018: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Abhinandan Mani Tripathi, Abhishek Niranjan, Sribash Roy
Development of flower color in plants is a complex process. Among others, it is an important trait for ornamental flowering plants. Canna is a flowering ornamental plant of family Cannaceae. To understand the molecular mechanism of flower color development in Canna, RNA sequencing from flower tissues of two contrasting flower color cultivars, Red President (RP) and Tropical Sunrise (TS) was performed. More than 27.0 million and 19.0 million clean reads were obtained from RP and TS, respectively. The combined clean reads were assembled into 147,295 unigenes...
March 7, 2018: Plant Physiology and Biochemistry: PPB
Nilam Borah, Emad Albarouki, Jan Schirawski
Many plant-pathogenic fungi are highly host-specific. In most cases, host-specific interactions evolved at the time of speciation of the respective host plants. However, host jumps have occurred quite frequently, and still today the greatest threat for the emergence of new fungal diseases is the acquisition of infection capability of a new host by an existing plant pathogen. Understanding the mechanisms underlying host-switching events requires knowledge of the factors determining host-specificity. In this review, we highlight molecular methods that use a comparative approach for the identification of host-specificity factors...
March 15, 2018: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Peng He, Patamarerk Engsontia, Guang-Lei Chen, Qian Yin, Jun Wang, Xu Lu, Ya-Nan Zhang, Zhao-Qun Li, Ming He
BACKGROUND: The white-backed planthopper (WBPH) Sogatella furcifera Horváth, the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens, and the small brown planthopper (SBPH) Laodelphax striatellus (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) are rice pests that damage rice plants by sap-sucking and by transmitting viruses. Host-seeking behavior involves chemosensory receptor genes, which include odorant receptors (ORs), ionotropic receptors (IRs) and gustatory receptors (GRs). RESULTS: We used genome and transcriptome data to identify 141 ORs, 28 GRs and 25 IRs in BPH, 135 ORs, 18 GRs and 16 IRs in WBPH and 37 ORs, 14 GRs and 6 IRs in SBPH...
March 15, 2018: Pest Management Science
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