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Autoinflammatory disorder

Daniel L Kenney-Jung, Annamaria Vezzani, Robert J Kahoud, Reghann G LaFrance-Corey, Mai-Lan Ho, Theresa Wampler Muskardin, Elaine C Wirrell, Charles L Howe, Eric T Payne
Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES) is a devastating epileptic encephalopathy with limited treatment options and an unclear etiology. Anakinra is a recombinant version of the human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist used to treat autoinflammatory disorders. This is the first report of anakinra for treatment of a child with super-refractory status epilepticus secondary to FIRES. Anakinra was well-tolerated and effective. Cerebral spinal fluid analysis revealed elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines before treatment that normalized on anakinra, suggesting a potential pathogenic role for neuroinflammation in FIRES...
October 22, 2016: Annals of Neurology
Sentaro Imamura, Shintaro Narita, Ryuta Nishikomori, Hiroshi Tsuruta, Kazuyuki Numakura, Atsushi Maeno, Mitsuru Saito, Takamitsu Inoue, Norihiko Tsuchiya, Hiroshi Nanjo, Toshio Heike, Shigeru Satoh, Tomonori Habuchi
BACKGROUND: Secondary bladder amyloidosis is an extremely rare disease, resulting from a chronic systematic inflammatory disorder associated with amyloid deposits. Although uncommon in Japan, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent episodes of fever of short duration and serositis and is frequently associated with systemic amyloidosis. Here, we present a case of a Japanese patient complaining of fever and macroscopic hematuria after a living donor renal transplantation...
October 19, 2016: BMC Research Notes
A González García, J L Patier de la Peña, N Ortego Centeno
Autoinflammatory diseases are clinical conditions with inflammatory manifestations that present in a periodic or persistent manner and are caused by acquired or hereditary disorders of the innate immune response. In general, these diseases are more common in childhood, but cases have been reported in adults and are therefore important for all specialists. There are few references on these diseases in adults due to their low prevalence and underdiagnosis. The aim of this study is to review the scientific literature on these disorders to systematise their clinical, prognostic and treatment response characteristics in adults...
October 1, 2016: Revista Clínica Española
Stephanie R Harrison, Dennis McGonagle, Sharmin Nizam, Stephen Jarrett, Jeroen van der Hilst, Michael F McDermott, Sinisa Savic
BACKGROUND: Some adult patients presenting with unexplained pyrexia, serositis, skin rashes, arthralgia, myalgia, and other symptoms commonly found in autoinflammatory disorders may not fit a specific diagnosis, either because their clinical phenotype is nondiagnostic or genetic tests are negative. We used the term undifferentiated systemic autoinflammatory disorder (uSAID) to describe such cases. Given that well-defined autoinflammatory diseases show responses to IL-1 blockade, we evaluated whether anakinra was useful for both diagnosing and treating uSAID patients...
May 5, 2016: JCI Insight
Ravi Varma, Gary Campbell, Helen Baxendale
Autoinflammatory diseases are disorders of innate immunity and are characterised by recurring and unprovoked episodes of inflammation. We present a case of episodic pyrexia, associated with a significant inflammatory response, in a young man in whom the cause had remained unexplained since infancy. He was eventually diagnosed with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D syndrome (HIDS); one of the autoinflammatory syndromes.
October 2016: Clinical Medicine: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London
Daniel Peckham, Thomas Scambler, Sinisa Savic, Michael F McDermott
Immune-mediated autoinflammatory diseases are occupying an increasingly prominent position among the pantheon of debilitating conditions that afflict mankind. This review focuses on some of the key developments which have occurred since the original description of autoinflammatory disease in 1999, and focuses on underlying mechanisms that trigger autoinflammation. The monogenic autoinflammatory disease range has expanded considerably during that time, and now includes a broad spectrum of disorders, including relatively common conditions such as cystic fibrosis and subsets of systemic lupus erythematosus...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Pathology
Hanna Kim, Gina A Montealegre Sanchez, Raphaela Goldbach-Mansky
Autoinflammatory disorders are sterile inflammatory conditions characterized by episodes of early-onset fever and disease-specific patterns of organ inflammation. Recently, the discoveries of monogenic disorders with strong type I interferon (IFN) signatures caused by mutations in proteasome degradation and cytoplasmic RNA and DNA sensing pathways suggest a pathogenic role of IFNs in causing autoinflammatory phenotypes. The IFN response gene signature (IGS) has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases...
October 2016: Journal of Molecular Medicine: Official Organ of the "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte"
Maryam Beheshtian, Nasim Izadi, Gernot Kriegshauser, Kimia Kahrizi, Elham Parsi Mehr, Maryam Rostami, Masoumeh Hosseini, Maryam Azad, Mona Montajabiniat, Ariana Kariminejad, Stefan Nemeth, Christian Oberkanins, Hossein Najmabadi
Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder caused by mutations in the MEFV gene. The disease is especially common among Armenian, Turkish, Jewish and Middle East Arab populations. To identify the frequency and the spectrum of common MEFV mutations in different Iranian populations, we investigated a cohort of 208 unselected asymptomatic individuals and 743 FMF patients. Nine hundred and fifty-one samples were analysed for the presence of 12 MEFV mutations by PCR and reverse-hybridization (FMF StripAssay, ViennaLab, Vienna, Austria)...
September 2016: Journal of Genetics
Shelly Pathak, Michael F McDermott, Sinisa Savic
The spectrum of systemic autoinflammatory disorders broadens continually. In part, this is due to the more widespread application of massive parallel sequencing, helping with novel gene discovery in this and other areas of rare diseases. Some of the conditions that have been described fit neatly into a conventional idea of autoinflammation. Others, such as interferon-mediated autoinflammatory diseases, are broadening the concept which we consider to be autoinflammatory disorders. There is also a widening of the clinical phenotypes associated with certain genetic mutations, as genetic testing is used more regularly and increasing numbers of patients are screened...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Clinical Pathology
Min Shen, Lin Tang, Xiaochun Shi, Xiaofeng Zeng, Qingping Yao
As one of the systemic autoinflammatory diseases (SAIDs), the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein (NLRP)12 autoinflammatory disease (NLRP12-AD) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with NLRP12 mutation. SAIDs have been hardly reported in the Chinese population, and NLRP12-AD has been reported only in Caucasians. We report the first case series of NLRP12-AD in the Chinese population coupled with literature review. Three Han Chinese adult patients with clinical phenotype suggestive of NLRP12-AD carrying NLRP12 variants were treated by the authors in 2015...
September 16, 2016: Clinical Rheumatology
Noa Safra, Peta L Hitchens, Emanual Maverakis, Anupam Mitra, Courtney Korff, Eric Johnson, Amir Kol, Michael J Bannasch, Niels C Pedersen, Danika L Bannasch
Metaphyseal osteopathy (MO) (hypertrophic osteodystrophy) is a developmental disorder of unexplained etiology affecting dogs during rapid growth. Affected dogs experience relapsing episodes of lytic/sclerotic metaphyseal lesions and systemic inflammation. MO is rare in the general dog population; however, some breeds (Weimaraner, Great Dane and Irish Setter) have a much higher incidence, supporting a hereditary etiology. Autoinflammatory childhood disorders of parallel presentation such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), and deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), involve impaired innate immunity pathways and aberrant cytokine production...
October 15, 2016: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Sigrun R Hofmann, Anja Schnabel, Angela Rösen-Wolff, Henner Morbach, Hermann J Girschick, Christian M Hedrich
Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) is an autoinflammatory bone disorder, covering a clinical spectrum with asymptomatic inflammation of single bones at the one end, and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) at the other end. The exact molecular pathophysiology of CNO remains largely unknown. Provided familial clusters and the association with inflammatory disorders of the skin and intestine suggest a genetic predisposition. Recently, profound dysregulation of cytokine responses was demonstrated in CRMO...
September 1, 2016: Journal of Rheumatology
Yvonne Zeissig, Britt-Sabina Petersen, Andre Franke, Richard S Blumberg, Sebastian Zeissig
The study of rare phenotypes has a long history in the description of autoimmune disorders. First Mendelian syndromes of idiopathic tissue destruction were defined more than 100 years ago and were later revealed to result from immune-mediated reactivity against self. In the past two decades, continuous advances in sequencing technology and particularly the advent of next-generation sequencing have allowed to define the genetic basis of an ever-growing number of Mendelian forms of autoimmunity. This has provided unique insight into the molecular pathways that govern immunological homeostasis and that are indispensable for the prevention of self-reactive immune-mediated tissue damage and 'horror autotoxicus'...
October 11, 2016: Immunology and Cell Biology
Leslie A Favier, Grant S Schulert
Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity...
2016: Application of Clinical Genetics
Nermeen Galal, Safa Meshaal, Rabab Elhawary, Dalia Abd ElAziz, Radwa Alkady, Sohilla Lotfy, Alia Eldash, Jeanette Boutros, Aisha Elmarsafy
INTRODUCTION: Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs) are heterogeneous disorders that mainly present with severe, persistent, unusual, or recurrent infections in childhood. Reports from different parts of the world indicate a difference between Western and Eastern populations. AIM: The aim of this study was to report on the different patterns of PIDs and identify subgroup characteristics in a highly consanguineous population in Egypt. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review for children below 18 years diagnosed with PID at Cairo University Pediatric Hospital from 2010 to 2014...
October 2016: Journal of Clinical Immunology
Marije I Koenders, Wim B van den Berg
Rheumatic disease is not a single disorder, but a group of more than 100 diseases that affect joints, connective tissues, and/or internal organs. Although rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) differ in their pathogenesis and clinical presentation, the treatment of these inflammatory disorders overlaps. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are used to reduce pain and inflammation. Additional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are prescribed to slowdown disease progression, and is in RA more frequently and effectively applied than in AS...
2016: Drug Design, Development and Therapy
Elena Naz Villalba, Enrique Gomez de la Fuente, Dolores Caro Gutierrez, Fernando Pinedo Moraleda, Julio Yanguela Rodilla, Diana Mazagatos Angulo, Jose Luis López Estebaranz
Autoinflammatory syndromes are a recently described group of conditions caused by mutations in multiple genes that code for proteins of the innate immune system. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes are autoinflammatory diseases comprising three clinically overlapping disorders: familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease. MWS is characterized by a moderate phenotype with fever, rash, arthralgia, conjunctivitis, sensorineural deafness, and potentially life-threatening amyloidosis...
September 2016: Pediatric Dermatology
Per Wekell, Anna Karlsson, Stefan Berg, Anders Fasth
UNLABELLED: There have been remarkable developments in the field of autoinflammatory diseases over the last 20 years. Research has led to definitions of new conditions, increased understanding of disease mechanisms and specific treatment. The polygenic autoinflammatory condition of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) is the most common autoinflammatory disorder among children in many parts of the world. The clinical features often include clockwork regularity of episodes, prompt responses to corticosteroids and therapeutic effects of tonsillectomy, but the disease mechanisms are largely unknown...
October 2016: Acta Paediatrica
Giuseppe Patuzzo, Alessandro Barbieri, Elisa Tinazzi, Dino Veneri, Giuseppe Argentino, Francesca Moretta, Antonio Puccetti, Claudio Lunardi
Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by primary hypogammaglobulinemia. B and T cell abnormalities have been described in CVID. Typical clinical features of CVID are recurrent airway infections; lymphoproliferative, autoinflammatory, or neoplastic disorders; and autoimmune diseases among which autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common. The coexistence of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity appears paradoxical, since one represents a hypoimmune state and the other a hyperimmune state...
September 2016: Autoimmunity Reviews
Rolando Cimaz
Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) is a systemic inflammatory disease which has up to now been classified as a category of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, in this context, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it may rather be part of the spectrum of autoinflammatory disorders. The disease is in fact unique with regard to the other JIA categories, in terms of clinical manifestations, prognosis, and response to conventional immunosuppressant therapies...
September 2016: Autoimmunity Reviews
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