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temporal bone trauma

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314420/sport-injuries-of-the-ear-and-temporal-bone
#1
REVIEW
L Mariel Osetinsky, Grant S Hamilton, Matthew L Carlson
In cases of head trauma, the ear should be evaluated in all of its components. A good understanding of otologic and skull base anatomy enables a thorough trauma assessment of this complex anatomic region. Auricular laceration, abrasion, avulsion, hematoma, frostbite, otitis externa, exostosis, tympanic membrane perforation, ossicular discontinuity, perilymphatic fistula, labyrinthine concussion, temporal bone fracture, facial nerve paresis, and sensorineural hearing loss are a few of the more common otologic injuries seen in active patients...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28302380/surgical-timing-for-facial-paralysis-after-temporal-bone-trauma
#2
Peng Xu, Aiyan Jin, Baoqiang Dai, Ruijie Li, Yefeng Li
OBJECTIVES: To explore surgical timing of facial paralysis after temporal bone trauma. METHODS: The clinical data of the patients with facial paralysis after temporal bone trauma who underwent subtotal facial nerve decompression were retrospectively collected, and 80 cases followed-up for one year were enrolled in the study. They were divided into different subgroups according to the age, onset, and interval between facial paralysis and surgery, and the outcomes of facial nerve between different subgroups were compared...
January 19, 2017: American Journal of Otolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298577/trauma-imaging-a-literature-review
#3
Jason Heath Vela, Christopher Ira Wertz, Kimberly L Onstott, Joss R Wertz
PURPOSE: To inform radiologic technologists about which imaging modalities and examinations are best suited for evaluating specific anatomical structures in patients who have sustained a traumatic injury. METHODS: Two scholarly research databases were searched to identify articles focused on trauma imaging of the head, cervical spine, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Articles focused on trauma diagnosis were excluded. Thirty-two articles were selected for analysis. DISCUSSION: Physical examination and plain-film radiographs typically are used to assess nasal bone fracures...
January 2017: Radiologic Technology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238160/insertion-forces-and-intracochlear-trauma-in-temporal-bone-specimens-implanted-with-a-straight-atraumatic-electrode-array
#4
Marjan Mirsalehi, Thomas S Rau, Lenka Harbach, Silke Hügl, Saleh Mohebbi, Thomas Lenarz, Omid Majdani
The aim of the study was to evaluate insertion forces during manual insertion of a straight atraumatic electrode in human temporal bones, and post-implantation histologic evaluation of the samples to determine whether violation of intracochlear structures is related to insertion forces. In order to minimize intracochlear trauma and preserve residual hearing during cochlear implantation, knowledge of the insertion forces is necessary. Ten fresh frozen human temporal bones were prepared with canal wall down mastoidectomy...
February 25, 2017: European Archives of Oto-rhino-laryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28225319/cone-beam-computed-tomography-and-histological-evaluations-of-a-straight-electrode-array-positioning-in-temporal-bones
#5
Isabelle Mosnier, Charlotte Célérier, Jean-Loup Bensimon, Daniele de Seta, Olivier Sterkers, Yann Nguyen, Daniele Bernardeschi
CONCLUSION: CBCT allows a precise evaluation of the dimensions and of the shape of the cochlear duct that is of primary importance for the choice of the length and the design of the electrode array. This radio-histological study confirms that CBCT is a reliable tool to be used in clinical studies to evaluate the position of straight electrode arrays within the cochlear scala. OBJECTIVE: To validate the reliability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the evaluation of cochlear anatomy and positioning of a straight electrode array, by comparing radiological images to histological analysis of cochlear implanted temporal bones...
March 2017: Acta Oto-laryngologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216124/the-pattern-and-degree-of-capsular-fibrous-sheaths-surrounding-cochlear-electrode-arrays
#6
Reuven Ishai, Barbara S Herrmann, Joseph B Nadol, Alicia M Quesnel
An inflammatory tissue reaction around the electrode array of a cochlear implant (CI) is common, in particular at the electrode insertion region (cochleostomy) where mechanical trauma often occurs. However, the factors determining the amount and causes of fibrous reaction surrounding the stimulating electrode, especially medially near the perimodiolar location, are unclear. Temporal bone (TB) specimens from patients who had undergone cochlear implantation during life with either Advanced Bionics (AB) Clarion (TM) or HiRes90K(TM) (Sylmar, CA, USA) devices that have a half-band and a pre-curved electrode, or Cochlear (TM) Nucleus (Sydney, Australia) device that have a full-band and a straight electrode were evaluated...
February 16, 2017: Hearing Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28124635/clinical-features-and-radiological-evaluation-of-otic-capsule-sparing-temporal-bone-fractures
#7
S W Song, B C Jun, H Kim
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical and radiological aspects of otic capsule sparing temporal bone fractures. METHODS: Using medical records, 188 temporal bones of 173 patients with otic capsule sparing temporal bone fractures were evaluated. Otoscopic findings and symptoms, facial paralysis, and hearing loss were assessed. RESULTS: Using regional analysis, 7 fractures were classified as type I, 85 as type II, 169 as type III and 114 as type IV...
March 2017: Journal of Laryngology and Otology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28114180/is-serial-electroneuronography-indicated-following-temporal-bone-trauma
#8
Aaron Kyle Remenschneider, Suzanne Michalak, Elliott D Kozin, Samuel Barber, Ronald K De Venecia, Tessa A Hadlock, David H Jung
OBJECTIVE: Contemporary guidelines advise facial nerve (FN) decompression within 2 weeks of temporal bone trauma if a single electroneuronography (ENoG) demonstrates more than 90% degeneration of the FN. We report a case series demonstrating the potential of serial ENoG to guide FN management more than 2 weeks following injury. PATIENTS: Adults with traumatic temporal bone fractures and resultant ipsilateral FN paresis. INTERVENTION: Serial ENoG followed by observation or decompression of the FN...
April 2017: Otology & Neurotology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28099983/-the-relevance-of-abducent-nerve-palsy-in-ent
#9
Veit Maria Hofmann, Stephan M Niehues, Annett Pudszuhn
Patients suffering from abducent nerve palsy are usually primary seen by a conservative medical Specialist. In most cases the ENT specialist is secondary involved for treatment. In the majority of cases abducent nerve palsy is a temporary symptom associated with neurologic or vascular diseases. Rarely inflammation, neoplasm or fracture of the skull base cause this symptom and lead to an intervention done by the ENT surgeon. This case series describes retrospectively the abducent palsy seen through the eyes of an ENT surgeon...
January 18, 2017: Laryngo- Rhino- Otologie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28067182/successful-conservative-treatment-of-an-intracranial-pneumatocele-with-post-traumatic-hypoglossal-nerve-palsy-secondary-to-diffuse-temporal-bone-pneumocele-case-report-and-review-of-the-literature
#10
REVIEW
M A Taube, G M Potter, S K Lloyd, S R Freeman
BACKGROUND: A pneumocele occurs when an aerated cranial cavity pathologically expands; a pneumatocele occurs when air extends from an aerated cavity into adjacent soft tissues forming a secondary cavity. Both pathologies are extremely rare with relation to the mastoid. This paper describes a case of a mastoid pneumocele that caused hypoglossal nerve palsy and an intracranial pneumatocele. CASE REPORT: A 46-year-old man presented, following minor head trauma, with hypoglossal nerve palsy secondary to a fracture through the hypoglossal canal...
February 2017: Journal of Laryngology and Otology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28045786/three-dimensional-force-profile-during-cochlear-implantation-depends-on-individual-geometry-and-insertion-trauma
#11
Ersin Avci, Tim Nauwelaers, Volkmar Hamacher, Andrej Kral
OBJECTIVES: To preserve the acoustic hearing, cochlear implantation has to be as atraumatic as possible. Therefore, understanding the impact of the cochlear geometry on insertion forces and intracochlear trauma might help to adapt and improve the electrode insertion and reduce the probability of intracochlear trauma. DESIGN: The study was conducted on 10 fresh-frozen human temporal bones. The inner ear was removed from the temporal bone. The bony capsule covering the scala vestibuli was removed and the dissected inner ear was mounted on the three-dimensional (3D) force measurement system (Agilent technologies, Nano UTM, Santa Clare, CA)...
December 27, 2016: Ear and Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28042220/internal-carotid-artery-fibromuscular-dysplasia-in-a-child-incidental-postmortem-finding-after-head-injury
#12
Arulselvi Subramanian, Garima Aggarwal, Deepak Agarwal, Sanjeev Lalwani
Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a rare, segmental, nonatheromatous, and noninflammatory arterial disease of unknown etiology. It predominantly involves renal artery (60-75%) followed by extracranial part of the internal carotid artery and vertebral arteries (25-30%). The disease typically affects middle-aged women and involves intermediate-sized arteries throughout the body. There are rare case reports of extracranial FMD compounding a trauma case. A patient was brought to trauma center emergency with a history of fall from height...
January 2017: Journal of Laboratory Physicians
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28010723/evaluation-of-the-microgrinding-procedure-for-the-microscopic-analysis-of-temporal-bones
#13
J C Cisneros, R de Brito, G S de Martins, N Candido, R Ferraz, R Bento
INTRODUCTION: The microgrinding technique is used to study cochlear implant electrode positioning and cochlear trauma. It may be argued that this technique might cause damage to inner cochlear structures even without a cochlear implant insertion and thus it should not be recommended. Most papers do not explain how microgrinding is performed, referring to older papers for its description. Properly describing the technique and re-evaluating its safety may reassure researchers of their findings when studying trauma after cochlear implant insertion...
March 2017: Cochlear Implants International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28005808/spontaneous-epidural-pneumocephalus
#14
Serap Yucel, Hediye Pinar Gunbey, Gökhan Kutlar, Mustafa Ozdemir, Kerim Aslan, Lutfi Incesu
Spontaneous epidural pneumocephalus is a rare condition. The authors reported a 35-year-old male patient with tinnutus, dull headache, and swelling on his head. Patient had a history of head trauma and skull fracture from when he was 5 years old. Cranial computed tomography revealed increase in pneumatization of right mastoid air cells and large epidural air in temporoparietal region. Inner table of right temporal bone got thinner, causing communication of mastoid air cells with epidural space. Epidural air had septations and exerted mass effect on the right parietal lobe with minimal midline shift...
November 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906849/carotid-artery-aneurysm-a-rare-cause-of-hemotympanum
#15
Selçuk Güneş, Zahide Mine Yazici, Hakan Selçuk, Baver Masallah Şimşek, Mustafa Çelik, Fatma Tülin Kayhan
Temporal bone fractures can occur as a result of various head trauma. The most common cause of the hemotympanum is traumatic temporal bone fracture. Facial paralysis and hearing loss can be seen associated with temporal bone fracture. The development of the internal carotid artery aneurysm after temporal bone fracture is extremely rare. In this article, the authors evaluated carotid artery aneurysm that developed after temporal fracture and aneurism compressed by coagulated blood mass which showed itself as a hemotympanum...
January 2017: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27860211/ultrasound-guided-peristyloid-steroid-injection-for-eagle-syndrome
#16
Timothy Maher, Hariharan Shankar
The styloid process arising from the temporal bone is normally about 2.5 cm in length. For various reasons, including trauma and inflammation, it may become elongated. This elongated styloid process, when symptomatic with clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of local compression or neuropathic pain, is termed Eagle syndrome. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia is characterized by intermittent shooting sharp pain in the jaw, throat, tongue, and ear. Conservative management includes anticonvulsants, tricyclic antidepressants, and anti-inflammatory agents...
November 11, 2016: Pain Practice: the Official Journal of World Institute of Pain
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27825860/damage-to-inner-ear-structure-during-cochlear-implantation-correlation-between-insertion-force-and-radio-histological-findings-in-temporal-bone-specimens
#17
Daniele De Seta, Renato Torres, Francesca Yoshie Russo, Evelyne Ferrary, Guillaume Kazmitcheff, Dominique Heymann, Jerome Amiaud, Olivier Sterkers, Daniele Bernardeschi, Yann Nguyen
Cochlear implant insertion should be as least traumatic as possible in order to reduce trauma to the cochlear sensory structures. The force applied to the cochlea during array insertion should be controlled to limit insertion-related damage. The relationship between insertion force and histological traumatism remains to be demonstrated. Twelve freshly frozen cadaveric temporal bones were implanted with a long straight electrodes array through an anterior extended round window insertion using a motorized insertion tool with real-time measurement of the insertion force...
November 5, 2016: Hearing Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27765115/-pathological-changes-of-temporal-bone-after-cochlear-implantation-and-the-countermeasures
#18
P Han, X R Niu, X Y Du, Z C Chen, Y Xu, Y Cheng, Y Gao, Q Zhang, M Xu
Cochlear implant (CI) is an artificial electronic device which can provide a sense of sound to a patient with severe or profound hearing loss. Pathological changes have been observed after CI surgery, which might influence the effectiveness of the CI procedure. In this review, we divided the postoperative pathological changes of the temporal bone into two categories according to different stages: immediate trauma and delayed side effects. Immediate trauma might arise from traumatic insertion of the electrode during CI surgery, which included trauma at cochleostomy site, lateral wall trauma, basilar membrane injury, osseous lamina fracture and modiolar injury...
October 7, 2016: Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27755369/the-effect-of-scala-tympani-morphology-on-basilar-membrane-contact-with-a-straight-electrode-array-a-human-temporal-bone-study
#19
Juul Verberne, Frank Risi, Luke Campbell, Scott Chambers, Stephen O'Leary
HYPOTHESIS: Scala tympani morphology influences the insertion dynamics and intra-scalar position of straight electrode arrays. BACKGROUND: Hearing preservation is the goal of cochlear implantation with current thin straight electrode arrays. These hug the lateral wall, facilitating full, atraumatic insertions. However, most studies still report some postoperative hearing loss. This study explores the influence of scala tympani morphology on array position relative to the basilar membrane and its possible contribution to postoperative hearing loss...
January 2017: Otology & Neurotology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27738540/contralateral-cochlear-labyrinthine-concussion-without-temporal-bone-fracture-unusual-posttraumatic-consequence
#20
I M Villarreal, D Méndez, J M Duque Silva, P Ortega Del Álamo
Introduction. Labyrinthine concussion is a term used to describe a rare cause of sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular symptoms occurring after head trauma. Isolated damage to the inner ear without involving the vestibular organ would be designated as a cochlear labyrinthine concussion. Hearing loss is not a rare finding in head trauma that involves petrous bone fractures. Nevertheless it generally occurs ipsilateral to the side of the head injury and extraordinarily in the contralateral side and moreover without the presence of a fracture...
2016: Case Reports in Otolaryngology
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