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Wearable technology

Angela Barriga, José M Conejero, Juan Hernández, Elena Jurado, Enrique Moguel, Fernando Sánchez-Figueroa
In the last few years, telerehabilitation and telecare have become important topics in healthcare since they enable people to remain independent in their own homes by providing person-centered technologies to support the individual. These technologies allows elderly people to be assisted in their home, instead of traveling to a clinic, providing them wellbeing and personalized health care. The literature shows a great number of interesting proposals to address telerehabilitation and telecare scenarios, which may be mainly categorized into two broad groups, namely wearable devices and context-aware systems...
October 18, 2016: Sensors
Victor E Ezeugwu, Neera Garga, Patricia J Manns
PURPOSE: Understanding the determinants of sedentary behaviour (sitting or lying with low energy expenditure) in stroke survivors can enhance the development of successful behaviour change strategies. This qualitative study explored the perceptions of stroke survivors about sedentary behaviour and ways in which it can be changed. METHODS: An interpretative qualitative inquiry was used with thematic analysis of interview data. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured guide with 13 stroke survivors...
October 19, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Omar F Rahman, Maurice Y Nahabedian, Jeremy C Sinkin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Global Open
Sven Reek
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator has been available for over a decade. In recent years, the device has been prescribed increasingly for a wide range of indications. The purpose of this review is to describe the technical and clinical aspects of the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator. The available literature on safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness is reviewed, and indications for use will be discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator has been used successfully in more than 100 000 patients for a variety of indications...
October 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Cardiology
Steven Steinhubl
Despite having the basic tools necessary to appropriately identify and manage individuals with hypertension for over half a century it remains the single greatest contributing risk factor to morbidity and mortality worldwide today. Since diagnosis and effective treatment availability are not issues, this major failing in care can be attributed to inadequate systems of care: systems that have led to only <20% of hypertensive individuals globally having their blood pressure adequately controlled. Even in the US, where it is one of the most common reasons for a primary care visit, and with over $42...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Seung Woo Park
Rapid progress of mobile information technologies such as wearable sensors, wireless communication, and world-wide use of smartphone cause digital health innovations. In the field of hypertension, wearable blood pressure (BP) monitoring and its wireless transfer to anywhere through smartphone, mobile smartphone apps, and cuffless blood pressure monitoring system are expected to change the way of diagnosis and management of hypertension. Home BP monitoring would be easier and wireless data transfer to health care providers would be common...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
R Peng, Z Sonner, A Hauke, E Wilder, J Kasting, T Gaillard, D Swaille, F Sherman, X Mao, J Hagen, R Murdock, J Heikenfeld
Wearable sweat biosensensing technology has dominantly relied on techniques which place planar-sensors or fluid-capture materials directly onto the skin surface. This 'on-skin' approach can result in sample volumes in the μL regime, due to the roughness of skin and/or due to the presence of hair. Not only does this increase the required sampling time to 10's of minutes or more, but it also increases the time that sweat spends on skin and therefore increases the amount of analyte contamination coming from the skin surface...
October 18, 2016: Lab on a Chip
Sairam Parthasarathy, Mary A Carskadon, Girardin Jean-Louis, Judith Owens, Adam Bramoweth, Daniel Combs, Lauren Hale, Elizabeth Harrison, Chantelle N Hart, Brant P Hasler, Sarah M Honaker, Elisabeth Hertenstein, Samuel Kuna, Clete Kushida, Jessica C Levenson, Caitlin Murray, Allan I Pack, Vivek Pillai, Kristi Pruiksma, Azizi Seixas, Patrick Strollo, Saurabh S Thosar, Natasha Williams, Daniel Buysse
A wealth of scientific knowledge is being generated in sleep and circadian science. In order for us to realize the return on investment for such scientific knowledge and to improve the health of the nation, we need to disseminate and implement research findings into practice. An implementation gap - termed a "quality chasm" by the Institutes of Medicine - separates the scientific knowledge we possess and the implementation of such knowledge into preventative interventions or healthcare treatments. It is frequently reported that a time lag of 17 years transpires before medical research reaches clinical practice...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Gelu Onose, Vladimir Cârdei, Ştefan T Crăciunoiu, Valeriu Avramescu, Ioan Opriş, Mikhail A Lebedev, Marian Vladimir Constantinescu
During the last few years, interest has been growing to mechatronic and robotic technologies utilized in wearable powered exoskeletons that assist standing and walking. The available literature includes single-case reports, clinical studies conducted in small groups of subjects, and several recent systematic reviews. These publications have fulfilled promotional and marketing objectives but have not yet resulted in a fully optimized, practical wearable exoskeleton. Here we evaluate the progress and future directions in this field from a joint perspective of health professionals, manufacturers, and consumers...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Jean L Olson, Diane E Bild, Richard A Kronmal, Gregory L Burke
The MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) was initiated to address unresolved questions about subclinical cardiovascular disease and its progression to clinically overt cardiovascular disease in a diverse population-based sample, incorporating emerging imaging technologies for better evaluation of subclinical disease and creating a population laboratory for future research. MESA's recruited (from 2000 to 2002) cohort comprised >6,000 adults from 4 racial/ethnic groups, ages 45 to 84 years, who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline...
September 2016: Global Heart
Jun Sakuma, Daisuke Anzai, Jianqing Wang
Wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) is attracting much attention in daily healthcare applications, and human body communication (HBC) technology provides an evident advantage in making the sensing electrodes of ECG also working for transmission through the human body. In view of actual usage in daily life, however, non-contact electrodes to the human body are desirable. In this Letter, the authors discussed the ECG circuit structure in the HBC-based wearable ECG for removing the common mode noise when employing non-contact capacitive coupling electrodes...
September 2016: Healthcare Technology Letters
Micah T Prochaska, Valerie G Press, David O Meltzer, Vineet M Arora
BACKGROUND: Wearable face-mounted computers such as Google Glass™ , Microsoft HoloLens™, and Oculus' Rift(®), are increasingly being tested in hospital care. These devices challenge social etiquette, raise privacy issues, and may disrupt the intimacy of the doctor patient relationship. We aimed to determine patients' perception of and their privacy concerns with an archetype of wearable face-mounted computer devices, Google Glass. METHODS: Hospitalized inpatients were asked about their familiarity with Glass, how comfortable they would be and if they would be concerned about privacy if their physician wore Glass, if the use of Glass would affect their trust in their physician, and if they would want their physician to wear Glass if it improved their care...
October 12, 2016: Applied Clinical Informatics
Mohammed H Iqbal, Abdullatif Aydin, Oliver Brunckhorst, Prokar Dasgupta, Kamran Ahmed
With rapid advances in technology, wearable devices have evolved and been adopted for various uses, ranging from simple devices used in aiding fitness to more complex devices used in assisting surgery. Wearable technology is broadly divided into head-mounted displays and body sensors. A broad search of the current literature revealed a total of 13 different body sensors and 11 head-mounted display devices. The latter have been reported for use in surgery (n = 7), imaging (n = 3), simulation and education (n = 2) and as navigation tools (n = 1)...
October 2016: Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Andre Matthias Müller, Stephanie Alley, Stephanie Schoeppe, Corneel Vandelanotte
BACKGROUND: Promoting physical activity and healthy eating is important to combat the unprecedented rise in NCDs in many developing countries. Using modern information-and communication technologies to deliver physical activity and diet interventions is particularly promising considering the increased proliferation of such technologies in many developing countries. The objective of this systematic review is to investigate the effectiveness of e-& mHealth interventions to promote physical activity and healthy diets in developing countries...
October 10, 2016: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
S-Y Kim, K Kim, Y H Hwang, J Park, J Jang, Y Nam, Y Kang, M Kim, H J Park, Z Lee, J Choi, Y Kim, S Jeong, B-S Bae, J-U Park
As demands for high pixel densities and wearable forms of displays increase, high-resolution printing technologies to achieve high performance transistors beyond current amorphous silicon levels and to allow low-temperature solution processability for plastic substrates have been explored as key processes in emerging flexible electronics. This study describes electrohydrodynamic inkjet (e-jet) technology for direct printing of oxide semiconductor thin film transistors (TFTs) with high resolution (minimum line width: 2 μm) and superb performance, including high mobility (∼230 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1))...
October 6, 2016: Nanoscale
Lauren Powell, Jack Parker, Marrissa Martyn St-James, Susan Mawson
BACKGROUND: With advances in technology, the adoption of wearable devices has become a viable adjunct in poststroke rehabilitation. Regaining ambulation is a top priority for an increasing number of stroke survivors. However, despite an increase in research exploring these devices for lower limb rehabilitation, little is known of the effectiveness. OBJECTIVE: This review aims to assess the effectiveness of lower limb wearable technology for improving activity and participation in adult stroke survivors...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Joo Chuan Yeo, Kenry, Chwee Teck Lim
There has been an intense interest in the development of wearable technologies, arising from increasing demands in the areas of fitness and healthcare. While still at an early stage, incorporating microfluidics in wearable technologies has enormous potential, especially in healthcare applications. For example, current microfluidic fabrication techniques can be innovatively modified to fabricate microstructures and incorporate electrically conductive elements on soft, flexible and stretchable materials. In fact, by leverarging on such microfabrication and liquid manipulation techniques, the developed flexible microfluidic wearable technologies have enabled several biosensing applications, including in situ sweat metabolites analysis, vital signs monitoring, and gait analysis...
October 18, 2016: Lab on a Chip
Seokwoo Son, Jong Eun Park, Joohyung Lee, Minyang Yang, Bongchul Kang
Single-layer flexible touch sensor that is designed for the indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-free, bendable, durable, multi-sensible, and single layer transparent touch sensor was developed via a low-cost and one-step laser-induced fabrication technology. To this end, an entirely novel approach involving material, device structure, and even fabrication method was adopted. Conventional metal oxides based multilayer touch structure was substituted by the single layer structure composed of integrated silver wire networks of sensors and bezel interconnections...
October 5, 2016: Scientific Reports
Sven Reek, Haran Burri, Paul R Roberts, Christian Perings, Andrew E Epstein, Helmut U Klein
The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator has been available for over a decade and now is frequently prescribed for patients deemed at high arrhythmic risk in whom the underlying pathology is potentially reversible or who are awaiting an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The use of the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator is included in the new 2015 ESC guidelines for the management of ventricular arrhythmias and prevention of sudden cardiac death. The present review provides insight into the current technology and an overview of this approach...
October 4, 2016: Europace: European Pacing, Arrhythmias, and Cardiac Electrophysiology
Michael Mackert, Amanda Mabry-Flynn, Sara Champlin, Erin E Donovan, Kathrynn Pounders
BACKGROUND: Approximately one-half of American adults exhibit low health literacy and thus struggle to find and use health information. Low health literacy is associated with negative outcomes including overall poorer health. Health information technology (HIT) makes health information available directly to patients through electronic tools including patient portals, wearable technology, and mobile apps. The direct availability of this information to patients, however, may be complicated by misunderstanding of HIT privacy and information sharing...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Medical Internet Research
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