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Mitochondrial brain

Xiang Li, Handong Wang, Yongyue Gao, Liwen Li, Chao Tang, Guodao Wen, Yuan Zhou, Mengliang Zhou, Lei Mao, Youwu Fan
The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the protective effect of quercetin administration against oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, quercetin has been proved to have a protective effect against mitochondria damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, its precise role and underlying mechanisms in traumatic brain injury are not yet fully understood...
2016: PloS One
Jiho Jang, Sangjun Park, Hye Jin Hur, Hyun-Ju Cho, Inhwa Hwang, Yun Pyo Kang, Isak Im, Hyunji Lee, Eunju Lee, Wonsuk Yang, Hoon-Chul Kang, Sung Won Kwon, Je-Wook Yu, Dong-Wook Kim
X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), caused by an ABCD1 mutation, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). Cerebral inflammatory demyelination is the major feature of childhood cerebral ALD (CCALD), the most severe form of ALD, but its underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we identify the aberrant production of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) and 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) in the cellular context of CCALD based on the analysis of ALD patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and ex vivo fibroblasts...
October 25, 2016: Nature Communications
Satomi Miwa, Rafal Czapiewski, Tengfei Wan, Amy Bell, Kirsten N Hill, Thomas von Zglinicki, Gabriele Saretzki
Telomerase in its canonical function maintains telomeres in dividing cells. In addition, the telomerase protein TERT has non-telomeric functions such as shuttling to mitochondria resulting in a decreased oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. TERT protein persists in adult neurons and can co-localise to mitochondria under various stress conditions. We show here that TERT expression decreased in mouse brain during aging while release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased...
October 22, 2016: Aging
G Mkrtchyan, A Graf, L Bettendorff, V Bunik
Decreased thiamine and reduced activity of thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) cause neurodegeneration. We hypothesized on concerted cell-specific regulation of the thiamine metabolism and ThDP-dependent reactions. We identified a smaller thiamine pool, a lower expression of the mitochondrial ThDP transporter, and a higher expression of OGDH in rat astrocytes versus neuroblastoma N2A. According to the data, the astrocytic OGDH may be up-regulated by an increase in intracellular ThDP, while the neuroblastomal OGDH functions at full ThDP saturation...
October 20, 2016: Neurochemistry International
Ewa Langwinska-Wosko, Marta Skowronska, Tomasz Kmiec, Anna Czlonkowska
BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration (MPAN) is an neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) subtype with mutation of C19orf12. Optic atrophy is one of the core symptoms in almost all MPAN cases, but the detailed ophthalmologic features of MPAN patients have not yet been described. METHODS: All consecutive symptomatic, gene proven MPAN patients underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination: best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), slit lamp examination, dilated fundus examination, tonometry, optical coherent tomography (OCT) and electrophysiological examinations...
November 15, 2016: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
P Tenreiro, S Rebelo, F Martins, M Santos, E D Coelho, M Almeida, A P Alves de Matos, O A B da Cruz E Silva
Synaptosomes are isolated nerve terminals. They represent an extremely attractive in vitro model system to study synaptic physiology since they preserve morphological and functional characteristics of the synapse. As such they have been used to investigate synaptic dysfunctions associated with neuropathologies like Alzheimer's disease. In the present work two simple methodologies for isolating synaptosomal-enriched fractions were compared for the first time. The starting points of both protocols were rat cortical or hippocampal homogenized tissues that underwent several differential centrifugation steps followed by a final purification of synaptosomal-enriched fractions using either a Percoll gradient or a Sucrose gradient...
October 19, 2016: Analytical Biochemistry
Andrew G Yee, Peter S Freestone, Ji-Zhong Bai, Janusz Lipski
Parkinson's disease (PD) is not only associated with degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the Substantia Nigra, but also with profound loss of noradrenergic neurons in the Locus Coeruleus (LC). Remarkably, LC degeneration may exceed, or even precede the loss of nigral DAergic neurons, suggesting that LC neurons may be more susceptible to damage by various insults. Using a combination of electrophysiology, fluorescence imaging and electrochemistry, we directly compared the responses of LC, nigral DAergic and nigral non-dopaminergic (non-DAergic) neurons in rat brain slices to acute application of rotenone, a mitochondrial toxin used to create animal and in vitro models of PD...
October 19, 2016: Experimental Neurology
Yingying Liu, Shanshan Fang, Qiushi Sun, Bo Liu
Glioblastoma is one of the most vascular brain tumour and highly resistant to current therapy. Targeting both glioblastoma cells and angiogenesis may present an effective therapeutic strategy for glioblastoma. In our work, we show that an anthelmintic drug, ivermectin, is active against glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo, and also targets angiogenesis. Ivermectin significantly inhibits growth and anchorage-independent colony formation in U87 and T98G glioblastoma cells. It induces apoptosis in these cells through a caspase-dependent manner...
October 19, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Shigeto Sato, Masato Koike, Manabu Funayama, Junji Ezaki, Takahiro Fukuda, Takashi Ueno, Yasuo Uchiyama, Nobutaka Hattori
Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (KRS) is an autosomal recessive form of early-onset parkinsonism linked to the PARK9 locus. The causative gene for KRS is Atp13a2, which encodes a lysosomal type 5 P-type ATPase. We recently showed that KRS/PARK9-linked mutations lead to several lysosomal alterations, including reduced proteolytic processing of cathepsin D in vitro. However, it remains unknown how deficiency of Atp13a2 is connected to lysosomal impairments. To address this issue, we analyzed brain tissues of Atp13a2 conditional-knockout mice, which exhibited characteristic features of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, including accumulation of lipofuscin positive for subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase, suggesting that a common pathogenic mechanism underlies both neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and Parkinson disease...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Pathology
Ning Jia, Qinru Sun, Qian Su, Shaokang Dang, Guomin Chen
Substantial evidence has shown that the oxidative damage to hippocampal neurons is associated with the cognitive impairment induced by adverse stimuli during gestation named prenatal stress (PS). Taurine, a conditionally essential amino acid, possesses multiple roles in the brain as a neuromodulator or antioxidant. In this study, to explore the roles of taurine in PS-induced learning and memory impairment, prenatal restraint stress was set up and Morris water maze (MWM) was employed for testing the cognitive function in the one-month-old rat offspring...
October 13, 2016: Redox Biology
Qian Cai, Prasad Tammineni
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by brain deposition of amyloid plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles along with steady cognitive decline. Synaptic damage, an early pathological event, correlates strongly with cognitive deficits and memory loss. Mitochondria are essential organelles for synaptic function. Neurons utilize specialized mechanisms to drive mitochondrial trafficking to synapses in which mitochondria buffer Ca2+ and serve as local energy sources by supplying ATP to sustain neurotransmitter release...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Geisa Nogueira Salles, Fernanda Aparecida Dos Santos Pereira, Cristina Pacheco-Soares, Fernanda Roberta Marciano, Christian Hölscher, Thomas J Webster, Anderson Oliveira Lobo
Bioresorbable electrospun fibres have highly functional features that can preserve drug efficacy, avoiding premature degradation, and control drug release rates over long periods. In parallel, it is known that Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been linked to impaired insulin signalling in the brain. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues have beneficial effects on insulin release and possess exceptional neuroprotective properties. Herein, we describe for the first time the incorporation of a GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide, into electrospun poly (lactic acid) (PLA) fibres with in situ gelatin capsules, in order to provide the controlled release of liraglutide, improving neuroprotective properties...
October 20, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Bernhard Reuss, Abdul R Asif, Abdullah Almamy, Christian Schwerk, Horst Schroten, Hiroshi Ishikawa, Charis Drummer, Rüdiger Behr
Prenatal maternal infections with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) correlate with an increased lifetime probability for the offspring to develop psychosis. We could previously demonstrate that in human choroid plexus papilloma cells, anti-NG antibodies (α-NG) bind to mitochondrial proteins HSP60 and ATPB, and interfere with cellular energy metabolism. To assess the in vivo relevance for this, especially during prenatal neural development, we investigated here interactions of NG-specific antisera (α-NG1, α-NG2) with brain, choroid plexus and other non-neural tissues in pre- and perinatal samples of the nonhuman primate (NHP) Callithrix jacchus (CJ), a NHP model for preclinical research...
October 17, 2016: Brain Research
Rita Valenzuela, Maria A Costa-Besada, Javier Iglesias-Gonzalez, Emma Perez-Costas, Begoña Villar-Cheda, Pablo Garrido-Gil, Miguel Melendez-Ferro, Ramon Soto-Otero, Jose L Lanciego, Daniel Henrion, Rafael Franco, Jose L Labandeira-Garcia
The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was initially considered as a circulating humoral system controlling blood pressure, being kidney the key control organ. In addition to the 'classical' humoral RAS, a second level in RAS, local or tissular RAS, has been identified in a variety of tissues, in which local RAS play a key role in degenerative and aging-related diseases. The local brain RAS plays a major role in brain function and neurodegeneration. It is normally assumed that the effects are mediated by the cell-surface-specific G-protein-coupled angiotensin type 1 and 2 receptors (AT1 and AT2)...
October 20, 2016: Cell Death & Disease
Mahar Fatima, Bharat Prajapati, Kanza Saleem, Rina Kumari, Chitra Mohindar Singh Singal, Pankaj Seth
Astroglia are indispensable component of the tripartite synapse ensheathing innumerous soma and synapses. Its proximity to neurons aids the regulation of neuronal functions, health and survival through dynamic neuroglia crosstalk. Susceptibility of astrocyte to HIV-1 infection and subsequent latency culminates in compromised neuronal health. The viral protein HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) is neurotoxic. HIV-1 Tat is detected in brain of AIDS patients even in cases where viral load is non-detectable due to successful HAART therapy...
October 20, 2016: Glia
Daniel V Guebel, Néstor V Torres
Motivation: In the brain of elderly-healthy individuals, the effects of sexual dimorphism and those due to normal aging appear overlapped. Discrimination of these two dimensions would powerfully contribute to a better understanding of the etiology of some neurodegenerative diseases, such as "sporadic" Alzheimer. Methods: Following a system biology approach, top-down and bottom-up strategies were combined. First, public transcriptome data corresponding to the transition from adulthood to the aging stage in normal, human hippocampus were analyzed through an optimized microarray post-processing (Q-GDEMAR method) together with a proper experimental design (full factorial analysis)...
2016: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Yiwei Wang, Roberta D Brinton
Brain is the most energetically demanding organ of the body, and is thus vulnerable to even modest decline in ATP generation. Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are associated with decline in mitochondrial function, e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis and multiple neuropathies. Genetic variances in the mitochondrial genome can modify bioenergetic and respiratory phenotypes, at both the cellular and system biology levels. Mitochondrial haplotype can be a key driver of mitochondrial efficiency...
2016: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Piotr T Filipczak, Cynthia L Thomas, Wenshu Chen, Andrew Salzman, Jacob D McDonald, Yong Lin, Steven A Belinsky
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic multi-organ disorder characterized by the development of neoplastic lesions in kidney, lung, brain, heart and skin. It is caused by an inactivating mutation in tumor suppressor genes coding the TSC1/TSC2 complex, resulting in hyperactivation of mTOR- and Raf/MEK/MAPK-dependent signaling that stimulates tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. Despite its oncogenic effect, cells with TSC deficiency were more sensitive to oxidative stress and dependent on mitochondrial metabolism, providing a rationale for a new therapeutic approach...
October 18, 2016: Cancer Research
Jason J Rose, Ling Wang, Qinzi Xu, Charles F McTiernan, Sruti Shiva, Jesus Tejero, Mark T Gladwin
Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning affects 50,000 people a year in the United States. The clinical presentation runs a spectrum, ranging from headache and dizziness to coma and death, with a mortality rate ranging from 1-3%. A significant number of patients who survive CO poisoning suffer from long term neurologic and affective sequelae. The neurologic deficits do not necessarily correlate with blood CO levels, but likely result from the pleiotropic effects of CO on cellular mitochondrial respiration, cellular energy utilization, inflammation and free radical generation, especially in the brain and heart...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
John E Cebak, Indrapal N Singh, Rachel L Hill, Juan Wang, Edward D Hall
Lipid peroxidation is a key contributor to the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Traditional antioxidant therapies are intended to scavenge the free radicals responsible for either the initiation or the propagation of lipid peroxidation (LP). A more recently explored approach involves scavenging the terminal LP breakdown products that are highly reactive and neurotoxic carbonyl compounds 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and acrolein to prevent their covalent modification and rendering of cellular proteins non-functional leading to loss of ionic homeostasis, mitochondrial failure, and subsequent neuronal death...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
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